The Detroit Packard Plant: 1939 vs 2012

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 02, 2012 7:16 PM GMT
    Thought this was cool enough to share. One of the overlay projects that allows you to see the changes in a photo from one time period to another. This selection is nearly as sad as the Sandy before/after sets. A once bustling city and surrounding housing districts.... all pretty much gone to decay.

    For those that don't know: From wiki: Packard was an American luxury automobile marque built by the Packard Motor Car Company of Detroit, Michigan, and later by the Studebaker-Packard Corporation of South Bend, Indiana. The first Packard automobiles were produced in 1899, and the last in 1958.

    I can't get the link to post right.... Here it is copy & paste below:
    http://www.freep.com/article/20121202/NEWS01/120823062/The-Packard-Plant-Then-now-interactive-comparison-photos?odyssey=mod%7Cdefcon%7Cimg%7CFRONTPAGE

    One set from the collection:

    1packard-new.jpg
    1packard-old.jpg
  • rnch

    Posts: 11525

    Dec 02, 2012 7:18 PM GMT
    a Link for the Lazy, pls
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 02, 2012 7:18 PM GMT
    rnch saida Link for the Lazy, pls


    I try and it doesn't work right.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 02, 2012 7:56 PM GMT
    http://tinyurl.com/cg3tqv8
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    Dec 02, 2012 8:09 PM GMT
    Photographers Yves Marchand and Romaine Meffre have an amazing set of photographs called 'The Ruins of Detroit'.

    http://www.marchandmeffre.com/detroit/index.html
    24.jpg

    Like Detroiturbex.com's Facebook page to see a different picture of Detroit each day. There really is some beauty in both the ruins as well as the buildings that are still functioning.

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Detroiturbexcom/109210839112636?ref=ts&fref=ts
    60515_505938159439900_1262844405_n.jpg
  • Whipmagic

    Posts: 1481

    Dec 03, 2012 2:19 AM GMT
    The decaying Packard plant has become a favorite set for gay porn.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 03, 2012 2:22 AM GMT
    Looks oddly similar to the town of Pripyat by Chernobyl.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 03, 2012 4:08 AM GMT
    Whipmagic saidThe decaying Packard plant has become a favorite set for gay porn.


    Is that really true??
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 03, 2012 4:21 AM GMT
    Here's a V-12 convertible that factory produced in 1939:

    file-153.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 03, 2012 4:57 AM GMT
    Whipmagic saidThe decaying Packard plant has become a favorite set for gay porn.


    What?

    Any links to porn set there. Just curious icon_lol.gif
  • Whipmagic

    Posts: 1481

    Dec 03, 2012 5:11 AM GMT
    ATC84 said
    Whipmagic saidThe decaying Packard plant has become a favorite set for gay porn.


    What?

    Any links to porn set there. Just curious icon_lol.gif


    Here is a link to a news article about one such production:

    http://supergaydetroit.blogspot.com/2007/08/gay-superheroes.html
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    Dec 03, 2012 5:37 AM GMT
    this is soo sad...i dont think buildings should be like this in AMERICA....like for Christs sake .. Detroit could be fixed in an instant but america...dont seem too interested to help a city that was once the heart of the country...it makes no sense..and i often ask myself how can this city be fixed and restored to what it use to be...minus the bigotry and partisan politics that made it into what you see today.
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    Dec 03, 2012 6:11 AM GMT
    tereseus1 saidthis is soo sad...i dont think buildings should be like this in AMERICA....like for Christs sake .. Detroit could be fixed in an instant but america...dont seem too interested to help a city that was once the heart of the country...it makes no sense..and i often ask myself how can this city be fixed and restored to what it use to be...minus the bigotry and partisan politics that made it into what you see today.


    Honestly like old textile cities like Holyoke, MA likely never again. Industries like the auto factories no longer need such sprawling complexes. At one point Buick City in Detroit employed 27,000 people at one site. These days thanks to automated assembly lines the same work could likely be done with a few thousand workers. And still cheaper to build in Mexico or Canada these days than Michigan. Ironic that a symbol of Murica F*ck yah the Dodge Ram is built in Mexico.

    Some ghost town imagines from an decayed city not too far from me: Holyoke, MA which died out because we can't make apparel at competitive prices here in the US anymore.

    victory-theatre-holyoke-ma.jpg
    6598496273_d0e6a0bc9e_z.jpg
    7003615934_f12bc114a4_z.jpg
    6853530975_516174b121_z.jpg7562103344_bc6ae38537.jpg




  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 03, 2012 6:37 AM GMT
    im all for remembering history...and preserving historical buildings. I believe the country just mixing up its priorities. Yea you might can have an assembly line with motorized robots but couldn't it have been more awesome if new technologies..functioned within a historic old building..Like use the space. Like it really makes no sense being a wasteful society. NYC is the same...

    Roosevelt island prison and asylum
    roosevelt.jpg

    Plum Beach--
    http://www.juliawertz.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/beach.jpg

    Amirals Row
    Along Flushing Avenue is a stretch of abandoned mansions that served as naval officer’s housing as part of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The Navy Yard was closed in the 1960′s and the houses finally abandoned in the mid 70′s. Currently there is a battle going to save the mansions under the historical preservation act vs demolishing them for shitty high rise condos.
    admiralsuse.jpg
    admirals.jpg

    The Harlem Renaissance Ballroom
    dance-hall.jpg?w=750&h=500

    City Hall subway station
    city-hall-subway-station-nyc_1.jpg
    city-hall-subway-station-nyc_2.jpg

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    Dec 03, 2012 5:51 PM GMT
    I don't know much about the Flushing Ave mansions but looking at the street view of that area isn't doesn't look much like a desirable place to live. Why bring back to life old relics when there will never be a return on the investment spent. I doubt wealthy apartment seekers will want to live there and renovating to make lower income housing isn't likely a top priority for NYC.

    To bring back those mansions requires redevelopment of the neighborhoods around them. And like in Detroit that chances of that happening are slim.

    There are only so many jobs or residents you can attract. People are not a limitless resource. We don't want to become China pumping out pleasant developed cities and towns that remain unoccupied.
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    Dec 09, 2012 12:08 AM GMT
    This then and now of Detroit is number one right now on the front page of reddit.

    g3zbd.jpg

    http://imgur.com/a/ffGdg
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Dec 09, 2012 12:21 AM GMT
    "Packard automobiles were produced in 1899, and the last in 1958."

    No!!!

    The last Packard was produced in 1956. The "Packards" produced after that were not really Packards; they were Studebakers modified with pieces of fiberglass stuck on.

    When I lived in San Diego (1978 - 2004), I owned two Packards - a 1953 Packard Cavalier and a 1955 Packard Caribbean convertible which I twice drove in the gay pride parade.

    http://www.speedtv.com/gallery/view/900943/142943

    http://www.speedtv.com/gallery/view/1026930/318570


    Art Decco's photo is of a 1939 Packard V12 coup roadster. I once road in one, both in the front passenger seat and the rumble seat. People kept staring at us.

    Packard introduced the first production V12 in 1915; it was called a twin six. That was the same year that Cadillac introduced the first production V8. Packard was also the only independent auto manufacturer to produce an automatic transmission, the Ultramatic, which was introduced in 1949. It was also the first automatic transmission to have a lock-up torque converter.
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    Dec 09, 2012 1:45 AM GMT
    FRE0 saidArt Decco's photo is of a 1939 Packard V12 coup roadster. I once road in one, both in the front passenger seat and the rumble seat. People kept staring at us.

    More pics of that same Packard:

    file-154.jpg

    file-156.jpg
  • jchris86

    Posts: 20

    Dec 09, 2012 2:06 AM GMT
    Those abandoned old places are pretty cool to see. I love old cars too. A few times with my friends we've found old houses and stuff that have been empty for decades and they are amazing to go in and look around. Kinda creepy too but it's part of the fun. Something kinda timeless too about finding some abandoned car that no one has seen for 30 years sinking back into the earth. You wonder who owned it and all that kind of stuff. Cool pics.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Dec 09, 2012 2:22 AM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    FRE0 saidArt Decco's photo is of a 1939 Packard V12 coup roadster. I once road in one, both in the front passenger seat and the rumble seat. People kept staring at us.

    More pics of that same Packard:

    file-154.jpg

    file-156.jpg


    I was unhappy when they stopped making Packards and Hudsons. I didn't miss Nashs and Studebakers so much.

    Here is a Hudson Hornet; from 1951 - 1954, they were winning most of the stock car races their 308 cubic inch flathead 6:
    http://www.conceptcarz.com/view/photo/414825,11423/1953-Hudson-Hornet_photo.aspx#photo

    Here's the interior of the Hudson; notice that it has the GM Hydramatic transmission, which was available on Nash, Kaiser, Lincoln, Willys, and other non-GM cars:

    http://www.conceptcarz.com/view/photo/400012,11423/1953-Hudson-Hornet_photo.aspx#photo
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Dec 09, 2012 2:40 AM GMT
    I thought it would be interesting to compare a 1948 Packard limousine with a 1948 Cadillac limousine:

    http://daisylimo.blogspot.com/2012/09/1948-packard-new-york-type-limousine-cab.html

    http://www.chooseyouritem.com/classics/files/98000/98134.html

    Actually, the Cadillac is a 1949 limousine because I couldn't find a 1948. I think that the Packard has a more modern and sleeker look to it.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Dec 09, 2012 3:05 AM GMT
    Does anyone remember these airport limousines?

    http://www.forwardlook.net/forums/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=43603

    http://www.mclellansautomotive.com/photos/B12842.jpg


  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 09, 2012 3:15 AM GMT
    FRE0 saidDoes anyone remember these airport limousines?

    http://www.forwardlook.net/forums/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=43603

    http://www.mclellansautomotive.com/photos/B12842.jpg

    I definitely do. And some hotels used them, too, for purposes besides airport runs, in the days before passenger vans had been invented. The Checker at least has some luggage capacity, I'm not sure what you did if you rode in the Chrysler. I always drove myself or took a conventional cab at airports, never used one of these ultimate examples of car pooling.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Dec 09, 2012 8:10 AM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    FRE0 saidDoes anyone remember these airport limousines?

    http://www.forwardlook.net/forums/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=43603

    http://www.mclellansautomotive.com/photos/B12842.jpg

    I definitely do. And some hotels used them, too, in the days before passenger vans had been invented. The Checker at least has some luggage capacity, I'm not sure what you did if you rode in the Chrysler. I always drove myself or took a conventional cab at airports, never used one of these ultimate examples of car pooling.


    My memory may not be entirely accurate, but I seem to recall riding in a Chrysler limousine that was like a station wagon in back and could accommodate considerable luggage. Riding in those limousines was much more pleasant than riding in today's vans.

    I also remember riding in an airport limousine from the Minneapolis airport to downtown Minneapolis; that was about 1961, before smoking became socially unacceptable. I absolutely dreaded getting into the limousine because I knew that more than half of the passengers would be smoking making the ride an exceedingly miserable experience. The temperature outside was about -10F. I managed to sit in the back seat next to a window. I buttoned my overcoat over my scarf, turned up the collar, put on my ear muffs, and wound the window all the way down. Naturally at highway speeds the entire limousine immediately became very cold. Of course people complained about the cold and insisted that I close the window. I graciously agreed to close the window if they would refrain from smoking, but they refused, so I refused to close the window. They bitterly complained and said that I was being unreasonable; I told them that they were the ones being unreasonable. At the first stop, the driver noticed that the window was open and asked me to close it. I told him that I'd be glad to close the window if he'd ask the passengers to stop smoking, which he said he couldn't. I told him that in that case, I couldn't close the window. Of course such a thing would not happen today.
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    Dec 09, 2012 10:13 AM GMT
    Dude, this is so cool! A great party of Detroit history!