Adequate protein without protein shakes? (Are they necessary)

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    Dec 03, 2012 4:09 AM GMT
    I would like to gain some muscle mass and burn off the last 5-10 lbs. of fat I have. My goal is not to be a body builder but to be musculary lean.

    I weight train on a full body regimen for 90 minutes 3x per week. It is a pretty intense workout and I sweat a ton (and I'm not a big sweater when I work out).

    I have been drinking protein shakes lately after a workout but it seems with these shakes and processed bars there are a lot of artificial ingredients and chemicals which can harm your body in the long run.

    Let's say in one day I eat 2 eggs, a large chicken breast, a turkey breast, beans, nuts, tuna sandwich, and some soy milk. Would this provide the adequate protein for my goals?
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    Dec 03, 2012 4:24 AM GMT
    Actually, I thik the better question would be, what protein powders don't use any artificial flavors or chemicals?
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    Dec 03, 2012 4:38 AM GMT
    Have you considered upping your egg white consumption?
    Also, consider other protein sources, such as teff.
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    Dec 03, 2012 6:56 AM GMT
    GAMRican saidHave you considered upping your egg white consumption?
    Also, consider other protein sources, such as teff.


    I hate wasting food and throwing away the yolks, such a waste of cash.

    Is teff something you can make all at once and refrigerate?
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    Dec 03, 2012 7:02 AM GMT
    You can buy egg whites.

    You can also buy 100% natural whey protein from such brands as Biochem Sports. They even make a vegan protein powder.
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    Dec 03, 2012 7:41 AM GMT
    If you are in the US, you can buy frozen egg whites. I'm very jealous, in Australia they don't.

    As for getting your amount of protein from just food sources can def be done. You'd be best off to calculate. Maximum intake for muscle growth would be 2g per kg of body weight, that would be per day. (100g cooked chicken breast = 30g of protein = equivalent or slightly more than 1 scoop of whey protein powder).

    Apart from the good sources of foods you've listed you could also add cottage cheese as that's high protein and slow release at night.
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    Dec 03, 2012 7:49 AM GMT
    SpikeyAidan saidIf you are in the US, you can buy frozen egg whites. I'm very jealous, in Australia they don't..


    Yup, they do. I've bought it from woolworths and Coles plenty of times. icon_smile.gif
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    Dec 03, 2012 7:56 AM GMT
    Jeron said
    SpikeyAidan saidIf you are in the US, you can buy frozen egg whites. I'm very jealous, in Australia they don't..


    Yup, they do. I've bought it from woolworths and Coles plenty of times. icon_smile.gif


    Damn I have never seen them, which one do you go to?
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    Dec 03, 2012 8:01 AM GMT
    One in Brisbane. Hah
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    Dec 03, 2012 9:04 AM GMT
    Jeron said
    SpikeyAidan saidIf you are in the US, you can buy frozen egg whites. I'm very jealous, in Australia they don't..


    Yup, they do. I've bought it from woolworths and Coles plenty of times. icon_smile.gif


    Yep always been able to buy them in every state. IGA has them too
  • ozmuscle

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    Dec 03, 2012 12:13 PM GMT
    I prefer my protein from whole foods, although don't mind a protein shake after training.
    I'm also in Australia and have managed to find frozen egg whites recently too. I've gotta admit though, you guys in the States are spoilt for choice and have so many more good foods, supplements available - and at such good prices compared to here in Australia!
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    Dec 03, 2012 12:19 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidOh and if you're going to eat eggs don't throw away all the yolks. The yolks provide a powerhouse of nutrition. If you want to eat a lot of eggs, simply discard half the yolks of however many you consume. But if you're only eating two eggs then consume those two eggs whole:

    Minerals

    Egg yolks supply many different essential minerals. Two raw egg yolks supply 35 percent of the DRI for selenium, which helps to regulate the thyroid and fight oxidative stress. Egg yolks are also high in phosphorus, supplying 18.8 percent of the DRI. Two yolks also provide more than 5 percent of iron for women and more than 10 percent for men, as well as more than 7 percent of the DRI of zinc for both groups. While high in many other minerals, egg yolks are low in sodium, supplying less than 1 percent of the daily recommended maximum intake of 2,400 mg.

    Water-Soluble vitamins

    Although egg yolks do not provide any vitamin C, they do provide high amounts of some of the other water-soluble vitamins, particularly choline. Two yolks supply more than 40 percent of the DRI of choline for men and over 50 percent for women. In addition, two yolks supply more 20 percent of the DRI of vitamins B5 and B12, and more 10 percent of riboflavin and folate.

    Fat-Soluble vitamins

    Along with providing water-soluble vitamins, egg yolks are also high in some fat-soluble vitamins, especially vitamin D. Two yolks provide 23 percent of this vitamin, which helps to maintain calcium levels. Like many yellow and orange foods, egg yolks also provide vitamin A, with two yolks containing 18 percent of the DRI. Egg yolks contain less of the other two fat-soluble vitamins, with two yolks supplying only 5.9 percent of the DRI for vitamin E and less than 1 percent of the DRI for vitamin K.


    Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/252564-egg-yolk-nutrition/#ixzz2Dya40jFA


    Could not agree more on eggs. The concern over cholesterol with eggs is largely overrated. Over the past year, I've been eating 12-16 eggs per week (over an average four during the previous year), and my overall cholestrol number dropped by 7 points. (My HDL actually increased by two as well, which is awesome.) Now, if you are genetically predisposed to high cholesterol levels, it might be better to.limit your intake. Still, you can do yourself a lot of good by loading up on eggs and lowering your cholesterol intake in other areas like french fries and other fried foods.
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    Dec 03, 2012 11:51 PM GMT
    I've been eating 2 whole eggs every day for years (maybe 10?) and my cholesterol levels are in excellent condition (I had lab tests done a few months ago).
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    Dec 04, 2012 6:26 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    timshel saidI've been eating 2 whole eggs every day for years (maybe 10?) and my cholesterol levels are in excellent condition (I had lab tests done a few months ago).


    When I wasn't a vegetarian I used to eat a dozen eggs a day. No problems, my cholesterol never went over 115. My mother has high cholesterol (borderline) so there is a family history of cholesterol issues in my case. But what they are finding is that an overindulgence of refined carbohydrate consumption (the link is high glycemic index and perpetually spiking insulin levels) and declining testosterone levels are associated to high cholesterol levels.

    When I went off of my hormone replacement therapy my cholesterol shot up from 160 to 210 in three short months!

    After resuming testosterone therapy in three months my cholesterol dropped from 210 to 130 in three months.

    More cutting edge facilities are even prescribing a therapeutic dose for women to control cholesterol and balance out hormones for overall well being instead of prescribing statins (which can have many uncomfortable, and in some cases, dangerous side effects).


    Why are you on horomone therapy?