I'm still relatively new to this so how do I bulk my arms and chest without messing with my abdomen and other parts?

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    Dec 03, 2012 4:14 AM GMT
    My chest and my arms have generally always been flat and not too fat. All weight in my legs and stomach. I wanna beef up my arms and chest and I've been working out like a fool for hours four nights a week but the progress although slow is happening. How do I speed it up in those areas without adding back on the weight on my stomach and hips and legs?
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    Dec 03, 2012 5:52 AM GMT
    Walk every day. Take your heart rate to 80% of max for 20 minutes very day. Small meals, often.

    Get in motion. Eat cleanly often.

    Research this on your own: HIIT; cutting diet.
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    Dec 03, 2012 8:32 AM GMT
    You are better off focusing on 3-4 good quality exercises per body group with the occ isolation here and there. Wouldnt recommend doing more than 4 exercises per body part, you are just wasting your time. Rather do 4-6 sets of 4 good quality exercises. Put in 100% into each rep and always do a full range of motion until failure. If you want to beef up your arms do triceps and biceps on different days.

    You should be changing your exercise routine every 6 weeks as your muscles get used to it. You can alternate between low reps high weight to high reps low weight each 6 weeks.

    Nutrition advice - center your nutrition towards your pre and post workout. Always have protein within 30 mins of finishing plus a little bit of quick acting carbs. Always eat breakfast. Apart from that your diet should very clean, approx carb/protein/fat ratio should be around 40/30/30 or you could get by with 40/40/20. Make sure your fats are only from mono and poly sources and you have pretty much nil saturated fat. Carbs should all be slow release and evenly spread throughout the day and a lot less at night.

    If you have any questions on diet as a Dietitian I can help you, just message me.

    Like the previous poster has mentioned HIIT is the way to go about doing cardio when you are on a calorie restricted diet. It's fundamentals are very easy you just need to do 5-6 very intense workouts (swim, run, bike or whatever cardio) with short 1-2 min low intensity exercises or breaks in between.

    Good luck!

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    Dec 03, 2012 8:46 AM GMT
    SpikeyAidan saidYou are better off focusing on 3-4 good quality exercises per body group with the occ isolation here and there. Wouldnt recommend doing more than 4 exercises per body part, you are just wasting your time. Rather do 4-6 sets of 4 good quality exercises. Put in 100% into each rep and always do a full range of motion until failure. If you want to beef up your arms do triceps and biceps on different days.

    You should be changing your exercise routine every 6 weeks as your muscles get used to it. You can alternate between low reps high weight to high reps low weight each 6 weeks.

    Nutrition advice - center your nutrition towards your pre and post workout. Always have protein within 30 mins of finishing plus a little bit of quick acting carbs. Always eat breakfast. Apart from that your diet should very clean, approx carb/protein/fat ratio should be around 40/30/30 or you could get by with 40/40/20. Make sure your fats are only from mono and poly sources and you have pretty much nil saturated fat. Carbs should all be slow release and evenly spread throughout the day and a lot less at night.

    If you have any questions on diet as a Dietitian I can help you, just message me.

    Like the previous poster has mentioned HIIT is the way to go about doing cardio when you are on a calorie restricted diet. It's fundamentals are very easy you just need to do 5-6 very intense workouts (swim, run, bike or whatever cardio) with short 1-2 min low intensity exercises or breaks in between.

    Good luck!



    I'm sorry but a lot of that I don't understand:

    -what is HIIT?
    -When you were referring to those rations like the 40/30/40 is that referring to like the calorie, Carb and fat intake?
    -mono and poly sources...like complex and simple carbs and sugars right?
    -what is nil saturated fat?
    -are there certain foods that are slow release carbs or are you saying I should small amounts of carbs throughout the day?
    -what are slow release carbs? Which foods are they?
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    Dec 03, 2012 9:15 AM GMT
    MashogaNubianPrince saidI'm sorry but a lot of that I don't understand:

    -what is HIIT?
    -When you were referring to those rations like the 40/30/40 is that referring to like the calorie, Carb and fat intake?
    -mono and poly sources...like complex and simple carbs and sugars right?
    -what is nil saturated fat?
    -are there certain foods that are slow release carbs or are you saying I should small amounts of carbs throughout the day?
    -what are slow release carbs? Which foods are they?


    Ah I was too technical, sorry about that.

    HIIT - High Intensity Interval Training, it's basically like doing cardio in a high intensity way with breaks in between or lighter cardio. It's effective because it doesn't take as long therefore you don't need as much carbs to give you the energy to do it and hence you can restrict your eating and still have energy to do it!

    mono and poly = avocado, olives, oily fish, nuts, seeds, do not omit these from the diet
    saturated fat = avoid full fat cheeses, meat fats, polony, salami, creamy sauces, full cream dairy, anything deep fried or most commercial prepared snacks, biscuits etc
    complex carbs (ie slow release) = sweet potato, brown rice, brown pasta (although white pasta is ok), legumes, fruit, dairy, quinoa, oats/muesli, wholegrain bread etc. These are fine in moderation and should be spread out during the day, I'd have more before and after your workout and less at night
    simple carbs = anything with added refine sugar, white bread, lollies, white rice etc, AVOID!

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    Dec 03, 2012 9:32 AM GMT
    SpikeyAidan said
    MashogaNubianPrince saidI'm sorry but a lot of that I don't understand:

    -what is HIIT?
    -When you were referring to those rations like the 40/30/40 is that referring to like the calorie, Carb and fat intake?
    -mono and poly sources...like complex and simple carbs and sugars right?
    -what is nil saturated fat?
    -are there certain foods that are slow release carbs or are you saying I should small amounts of carbs throughout the day?
    -what are slow release carbs? Which foods are they?


    Ah I was too technical, sorry about that.

    HIIT - High Intensity Interval Training, it's basically like doing cardio in a high intensity way with breaks in between or lighter cardio. It's effective because it doesn't take as long therefore you don't need as much carbs to give you the energy to do it and hence you can restrict your eating and still have energy to do it!

    mono and poly = avocado, olives, oily fish, nuts, seeds, do not omit these from the diet
    saturated fat = avoid full fat cheeses, meat fats, polony, salami, creamy sauces, full cream dairy, anything deep fried or most commercial prepared snacks, biscuits etc
    complex carbs (ie slow release) = sweet potato, brown rice, brown pasta (although white pasta is ok), legumes, fruit, dairy, quinoa, oats/muesli, wholegrain bread etc. These are fine in moderation and should be spread out during the day, I'd have more before and after your workout and less at night
    simple carbs = anything with added refine sugar, white bread, lollies, white rice etc, AVOID!



    Oh I get you now.

    Why are simple carbs bad? Isn't it good that they are more simpme and not so layered with carbs?
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    Dec 04, 2012 6:00 AM GMT
    Simple carbs and complex carbs have the same amount of carbs its just that simple carbs get converted into sugar in your bloodstream a lot quicker than complex ones which have more fibre in it.

    So therefore complex carbs keep you fuller for longer so you end up feeling less hungry and eat less overall, plus they better regulate your energy levels.

    I'll post about your questions from the msg in a tick!
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    Dec 04, 2012 6:38 AM GMT
    The original poster seems to be self defeating. He should have easily been able to research HIIT.

    I suspect this is symptomatic of his general approach towards many things: LAZY.
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    Dec 04, 2012 7:35 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidThe original poster seems to be self defeating. He should have easily been able to research HIIT.

    I suspect this is symptomatic of his general approach towards many things: LAZY.


    I'm on my phone and it's not that easy to go from website to website like that, lol.
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    Dec 04, 2012 7:42 PM GMT
    SpikeyAidan saidSimple carbs and complex carbs have the same amount of carbs its just that simple carbs get converted into sugar in your bloodstream a lot quicker than complex ones which have more fibre in it.

    So therefore complex carbs keep you fuller for longer so you end up feeling less hungry and eat less overall, plus they better regulate your energy levels.

    I'll post about your questions from the msg in a tick!


    Oh that makes a lot of sense. Thanks for explaining that to me.
  • gwuinsf

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    Dec 04, 2012 10:33 PM GMT
    Focus on slimming down. Your upper body will look more muscular when you lose the body fat.

    Sorry to be so direct, but you want to be in the Losing Weight forums.
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    Dec 05, 2012 8:14 PM GMT
    MashogaNubianPrince said
    SpikeyAidan saidSimple carbs and complex carbs have the same amount of carbs its just that simple carbs get converted into sugar in your bloodstream a lot quicker than complex ones which have more fibre in it.

    So therefore complex carbs keep you fuller for longer so you end up feeling less hungry and eat less overall, plus they better regulate your energy levels.

    I'll post about your questions from the msg in a tick!


    Oh that makes a lot of sense. Thanks for explaining that to me.


    There are basically two food streams: carbon chains, and amino acids. I.e., fat, alcohol, carbs (starch or sugar), and proteins. That's it.

    There are peptides, steroids, etc., that come into play, etc.

    Simply stated: the more tightly bonded the carbon chain, the longer it takes to break down. Fast sugars (loosely bonded carbon chains), spike insulin levels and cause nutrition to be shuttled INTO cells (along with anything else...like fats). Slower carbs (starches) cause less of an insulin response and less shuttling, but, more stable blood sugar levels. Fats (lipids) are tightly bonded and provide lots of energy.

    Try getting on a real computer and researching this for yourself. Once you come to understand The Human Machine (yes, there's even a series by this name), you'll become much more empowered to help yourself.
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    Dec 05, 2012 8:16 PM GMT
    not_superman said
    MashogaNubianPrince said
    chuckystud saidThe original poster seems to be self defeating. He should have easily been able to research HIIT.

    I suspect this is symptomatic of his general approach towards many things: LAZY.


    I'm on my phone and it's not that easy to go from website to website like that, lol.


    http://bit.ly/rGjgcn


    Bless your heart :-) LOL. Lazy people are...lazy people.
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    Dec 06, 2012 7:37 PM GMT
    chuckystud said
    MashogaNubianPrince said
    SpikeyAidan saidSimple carbs and complex carbs have the same amount of carbs its just that simple carbs get converted into sugar in your bloodstream a lot quicker than complex ones which have more fibre in it.

    So therefore complex carbs keep you fuller for longer so you end up feeling less hungry and eat less overall, plus they better regulate your energy levels.

    I'll post about your questions from the msg in a tick!


    Oh that makes a lot of sense. Thanks for explaining that to me.


    There are basically two food streams: carbon chains, and amino acids. I.e., fat, alcohol, carbs (starch or sugar), and proteins. That's it.

    There are peptides, steroids, etc., that come into play, etc.

    Simply stated: the more tightly bonded the carbon chain, the longer it takes to break down. Fast sugars (loosely bonded carbon chains), spike insulin levels and cause nutrition to be shuttled INTO cells (along with anything else...like fats). Slower carbs (starches) cause less of an insulin response and less shuttling, but, more stable blood sugar levels. Fats (lipids) are tightly bonded and provide lots of energy.

    Try getting on a real computer and researching this for yourself. Once you come to understand The Human Machine (yes, there's even a series by this name), you'll become much more empowered to help yourself.


    Well most of that makes sense. So like basically I should just avoid simple sugars and carbs and eat more proteins? That doesn't sound too hard.
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    Dec 19, 2012 2:11 AM GMT
    If you want to bulk you have to workout and eat, eat, eat. If you want to bulk without getting fat, you have to be even more careful with your diet.