Is it really worth living in NYC?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 04, 2012 4:00 AM GMT
    What's up everyone, I have been constantly thinking about why everyone (especially gays) move or want to move to NYC. It is the most expensive city in the country and yes even though I know the social scene there is amazing and the diverse people, but it is still worth the price tag? Rent is outrageous along with daily expenses. You are paying at,east 1k a month for an apartment the size of a typical homeowner's garage?!?

    I know tons of people who go to college in New York only so they can live the city life, they don't necessarily care about the academics nor are very driven for success. The driven people I have met great academics and jobs moved out of NYC because they didn't think the opportunities there are worth the price tag and had better success in markets like Miami and Chicago.

    Let alone, the job market there is the toughest in the nation. In order to live that superficial dream of living in NYC. I believe one will have to make at the very least 80k a year.

    I've been to NYC numerous times and the visits were either to visit family in long island / NJ or for debate competitions at the UN. Yes it is a great city, but I think there are other cities in the country that are much cheaper and the social scene will only be one status below NYC and possibly even better.

    The only reason why I would move there is if I go to Columbia for grad school or get a very nice job where my disposable income is higher than other offers I receive in different cities. Which unfortunately, is kinda of an unrealistic scenario in the current market.

    So my questions:

    1) What do the guys who currently live or have lived in NYC feel about their experience relative to the price?

    2) What about you guys who don't live in NYC feel about living there?


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    Dec 04, 2012 4:04 AM GMT
    Never will live there. I enjoy freedom and don't want to be surrounded by people every second and don't wanna live in a box.

    It is a great and unique city. Just isn't for everyone.
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    Dec 04, 2012 4:15 AM GMT
    It's one of the fewer major cities in the country that I've visited and enjoyed but don't want to ever live there.
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    Dec 04, 2012 4:23 AM GMT
    People may bash me but I think NYC is grossly overrated. Much like DC, I think people justify paying outrageous prices by saying it's so "diverse" or the "food is great" and blah, blah, blah....like they are trying to convince themselves it was worth paying thousands of dollars for a studio.


    Now, if I had the money I would move there in a heartbeat. But I still can't stand the winter weather and would miss the beaches in Miami...


    Just my 2 cents. Don't go spending it all at once...
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Dec 04, 2012 4:38 AM GMT
    no
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    Dec 04, 2012 4:40 AM GMT
    Idk, so I'd give it a try before I decide.
    I'd rather be somewhere I know at this point in my life.
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    Dec 04, 2012 4:42 AM GMT
    I think NY is fantastic, and you should give it a shot. I lived there for 11 years before moving out, and loved and hated it. But I learned a tremendous amount about how really great New Yorkers can be, and, though it's a hard living, it's also invigorating. But, get a summer house in The Hamptons.
  • Jard_03

    Posts: 15

    Dec 04, 2012 5:16 AM GMT
    I live in ATL so I contemplate suicide monthly if not weekly. Been to NYC many times and almost cry when I get back home. I say if you can work it financially speaking go for it, you can always leave if you don't like it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 04, 2012 5:59 AM GMT
    It's a legendary and iconic city and deserves every bit of hype it gets. I've been there many times.

    Having said all that, I would never live there.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 04, 2012 6:01 AM GMT
    New York is great to visit but I could never live there....
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    Dec 04, 2012 6:11 AM GMT
    The dirt, the stench, asphalt and concrete walls... Atleast it looks great from the sky!

    Just kidding! kind of... I've only been to New York once and never fully explored the city. It is very expensive to live there, which explains why many opt to live in New Jersey or Connecticut and commute instead. Same goes for DC. icon_neutral.gif

    A big city that feels like a small town is much better in my opinion.
  • ohioguy12

    Posts: 2024

    Dec 04, 2012 6:15 AM GMT
    msuNtx saidNever will live there. I enjoy freedom and don't want to be surrounded by people every second and don't wanna live in a box.

    It is a great and unique city. Just isn't for everyone.


    Ditto
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 04, 2012 6:19 AM GMT
    Born and raised in Brooklyn. Haven't been anywhere else I'd rather live.
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    Dec 04, 2012 6:24 AM GMT
    Jard_03 saidI live in ATL so I contemplate suicide monthly if not weekly. Been to NYC many times and almost cry when I get back home. I say if you can work it financially speaking go for it, you can always leave if you don't like it.
    +1
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    Dec 04, 2012 7:02 AM GMT
    Great way to waste all your money and savings and have nothing to show for it after it spits you out.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Dec 04, 2012 8:17 AM GMT
    jmusmc85 saidPeople may bash me but I think NYC is grossly overrated. Much like DC, I think people justify paying outrageous prices by saying it's so "diverse" or the "food is great" and blah, blah, blah....like they are trying to convince themselves it was worth paying thousands of dollars for a studio.


    Now, if I had the money I would move there in a heartbeat. But I still can't stand the winter weather and would miss the beaches in Miami...


    Just my 2 cents. Don't go spending it all at once...


    Who said I'd live in a friggin studio???icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
    Miami is a short plane flight away.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 04, 2012 8:24 AM GMT
    Born and raised, it's my home and no place yet has measured up.
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    Dec 04, 2012 8:48 AM GMT
    I would Love to visit New York. Sometime soon.
    Living there? You gotta have a good paying job to afford it.
    icon_confused.gif
  • melloyello

    Posts: 149

    Dec 04, 2012 8:51 AM GMT
    I've lived there. I thought it was pretty awesome.

    But please please please please please find me a $1k apartment in Manhattan!
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    Dec 04, 2012 8:55 AM GMT
    melloyello saidI've lived there. I thought it was pretty awesome.

    But please please please please please find me a $1k apartment in Manhattan!


    I would love to live in Dumbo...
    But I guess I have to be a rich artist to get an apartment there.

    (Working on it)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 04, 2012 8:55 AM GMT
    I visited NYC and stayed in Chelsea for about a week a while ago back in 2005 and had several friends who transferred to Manhattan for their job/work. I concluded that it's not for everyone after hearing their stories many times via email/phone conversations.

    NYC has everything, arts, music, food, culture, jobs, finance, tech...etc you name it. But it is expensive as hell, I believe it's the 10th most expensive city in the world (or up there with London and Paris). My friend is paying about $3000 a month for a tiny studio 400 square feet in Manhattan (no utilities included), she's a VP for Suisse Credit. It gets really cold in the winter and very hot in the summer. Basically she advises me if I can stand all that, then move there. icon_lol.gif

    I probably love New York a lot but not as much as Southern California, because I like to drive my car, has a house with a backyard, pool, palm trees and going to the beach or the mountain to play, the weather here is nice too. Beside, LA has pretty much everything NY has. Well maybe NY guys are a little hotter than Cali boys? I am just going by the movies/media, haven't met many of them.

    I don't think I can last in NY, like the Madonna song. Life is very fast-paced, people seem very rush and straight-forward and maybe harsh. This coming from a relaxed Cali guy. I'm happy where I am now. But if you're young and want an adventure, I'd say go for it, have no regrets. You can only determine if it's really worth it.
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    Dec 04, 2012 8:56 AM GMT
    I'd just live in Brooklyn and catch the train there everyday - not long and a lot cheaper. That way could still experience the New York Life!
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    Dec 04, 2012 9:10 AM GMT
    I personally love the city. Thanks to Jersey City, we're able to afford a place for almost half of what can be rented out ahout 3 miles away in the West Village.
    Some people really live for that New Yorker "212" status though. If you look hard enough, there's a simple box full of possiblities in the heights that won't totally suck the life out of your wallet.
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    Dec 04, 2012 9:30 AM GMT
    The people are rude, it has four (three) months of habitable weather, they keep all their trees in one effing park that's meh, garbage tumbleweeds blow through the streets like it's a Western staged by Oscar the Grouch, you can't own a car so you can occasionally escape, it's hyper-expensive, it's *flat*, is loud and crowded, has more rats than people and smells like pee everywhere.

    Other than that, I can't imagine why anyone wouldn't want to live there.
  • MarvelClimber

    Posts: 511

    Dec 04, 2012 12:41 PM GMT
    I've lived in Michigan and Florida. I've traveled extensively domestically and seen life in other places. I know NYC isn't for everyone. I thought I could never live here either, but when I visited in '02 I stayed in Times Square. My view of the city was completely skewed. It was only until I came to visit my friend who lived in Brooklyn that I saw the rich tapestry of the city. I value living among different cultures, public transportation, nice restaurants, great shopping, nearby mountains to climb, and spontaneity.

    The rational part of me moved here for a lot of reasons (jobs, dating pool, friends). But it ultimately came down to taking a risk. It payed off immediately and I'm still here two years later. People come for different reasons and those that leave may only remember the negative ones. Or maybe they only experienced negative living as a result of their approach. There are downsides to every city. The pros of NYC living and the men (OMG! --you have to go overseas to meet anyone hotter) far outweigh the negatives for me.

    Let me clear up a few misconceptions.
    1. You're not constantly surrounded by people. Visitors often stay in tourist-heavy spots and don't venture out. Every other day I hear some ignorant tourist saying how it's so crowded, they could never live here... on the corner of Herald fucking Square (where the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade is held)
    2. For every expensive thing, there is something free. Outdoor concerts, gay beaches, grand openings, release parties...
    3. NYCers aren't rude. It's the assholes that come from other places who give themselves permission to be rude because 'that's the way things are here.' NY-born and those that have "naturalized" are the nicest people I've ever met.
    4. There isn't just a gay scene. There's a niche for everyone. Are you a confused mixed-race queer into unicycles and knitting? There's a meetup group specifically for you.
    5. The food is not overrated. Any restaurant elsewhere that is on-par with NYC dining is just as expensive.
    6. You can have a car. You pay a high price for it in Manhattan. In the boroughs it's a lot easier/cheaper. Either way, you'll only want to drive late nights and weekends.
    7. People knowingly pay for things you can't quantify: opportunity, flexibility, options

    NYC living can kick your ass if you don't know how to prioritize your values. I do make a nice chunk of change. I could use that money to have a swank place, but I rather not pay $3000 a month for a 1 bedroom that I'm rarely in. I love to be out at events, performances, and restaurants without worrying about the price. I established what's important to me and what I can live without. Many try to Liz Lemon it (having it all) without having any money...see below:

    That superficial dream the OP referred to applies to people who don't manage their expectations and get that expensive apartment without understanding that you easily drop $30 for lunch for coworkers every day. Someone's birthday night out is $200. Shopping day? You won't make it through a full day as you're down $1700 in only two hours. And, surprise!, you just got your lease renewal and rent is going up $150/mo. Some newbies take the hipster route, shopping at overpriced vintage stores, going to bars and concerts every night, and complaining that they can't make their overpriced Williamsburg rent.

    The OP is about right about that 80K figure. You can live comfortably with a lot less, but, again, depends on your lifestyle. (Keep in mind that salaries are highly inflated here. Same 80K job here will be 60K in Chicago.) I don't agree that the job market is tough (unless you're in finance). There are a ton of opportunities here that just aren't in other markets. It's a very entrepreneurial city and there are city-funded avenues for you to start your own business. You do have to be aggressive in establishing your path, but that's the reality anywhere. You might think there's millions of other competitors, but there's actually few to compete in niche opportunities... and there are many of those.

    It's true about making it in NYC. If you do, you really can make it anywhere. That experience can be parlayed to other places. If you're driven and passionate about something, money will come. Mind as well do it while you're young.