Google Warns UN Not to Censor Web at Dubai Meeting

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 05, 2012 2:11 AM GMT
    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2412776,00.asp
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    Dec 05, 2012 7:00 AM GMT
    Yet Google is fine with censoring itself in China. It hides all search results which the Chinese government disapproves of. So if someone in China wants to find out about how China mistreats and tortures and summarily executes people, they can't. And it's likely that Google keeps track, for the Chinese government, of the IP addresses of people who search for those terms. So much for Google's slogan: Don't Be Evil. Hypocrites.
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    Dec 05, 2012 10:03 AM GMT
    sfbayguy saidYet Google is fine with censoring itself in China. It hides all search results which the Chinese government disapproves of. So if someone in China wants to find out about how China mistreats and tortures and summarily executes people, they can't. And it's likely that Google keeps track, for the Chinese government, of the IP addresses of people who search for those terms. So much for Google's slogan: Don't Be Evil. Hypocrites.


    Bullshit. What a completely ridiculous thing to say. You're talking about the only company that had the balls in the first place to tell the Chinese government no. Finally, they decided that participating to a limited extent and having some positive impact is a better approach than completely withdrawing. Which is likely true.

    Sometimes not everything can be summed up reasonably using binary concepts. Learn:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203436904577155003097277514.html
  • calibro

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    Dec 05, 2012 1:47 PM GMT
    principal0 said
    sfbayguy saidYet Google is fine with censoring itself in China. It hides all search results which the Chinese government disapproves of. So if someone in China wants to find out about how China mistreats and tortures and summarily executes people, they can't. And it's likely that Google keeps track, for the Chinese government, of the IP addresses of people who search for those terms. So much for Google's slogan: Don't Be Evil. Hypocrites.


    Bullshit. What a completely ridiculous thing to say. You're talking about the only company that had the balls in the first place to tell the Chinese government no. Finally, they decided that participating to a limited extent and having some positive impact is a better approach than completely withdrawing. Which is likely true.

    Sometimes not everything can be summed up reasonably using binary concepts. Learn:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203436904577155003097277514.html


    no, google is pretty evil for many reasons
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    Dec 05, 2012 5:14 PM GMT
    principal0 said
    sfbayguy saidYet Google is fine with censoring itself in China. It hides all search results which the Chinese government disapproves of. So if someone in China wants to find out about how China mistreats and tortures and summarily executes people, they can't. And it's likely that Google keeps track, for the Chinese government, of the IP addresses of people who search for those terms. So much for Google's slogan: Don't Be Evil. Hypocrites.


    Bullshit. What a completely ridiculous thing to say. You're talking about the only company that had the balls in the first place to tell the Chinese government no. Finally, they decided that participating to a limited extent and having some positive impact is a better approach than completely withdrawing. Which is likely true.

    Sometimes not everything can be summed up reasonably using binary concepts. Learn:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203436904577155003097277514.html

    So Google is able to operate just as freely in China as it does in the US or not? Not. Its searches are free from any censorship whatsoever or not? Not. In fact, the article you cited even explains the motive for Google to backtrack on its free speech/no censorship beliefs: Android in China. So please spare me your attempts to be an apologist for Google.
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    Dec 07, 2012 7:16 AM GMT
    sfbayguy said
    principal0 said
    sfbayguy saidYet Google is fine with censoring itself in China. It hides all search results which the Chinese government disapproves of. So if someone in China wants to find out about how China mistreats and tortures and summarily executes people, they can't. And it's likely that Google keeps track, for the Chinese government, of the IP addresses of people who search for those terms. So much for Google's slogan: Don't Be Evil. Hypocrites.


    Bullshit. What a completely ridiculous thing to say. You're talking about the only company that had the balls in the first place to tell the Chinese government no. Finally, they decided that participating to a limited extent and having some positive impact is a better approach than completely withdrawing. Which is likely true.

    Sometimes not everything can be summed up reasonably using binary concepts. Learn:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203436904577155003097277514.html

    So Google is able to operate just as freely in China as it does in the US or not? Not. Its searches are free from any censorship whatsoever or not? Not. In fact, the article you cited even explains the motive for Google to backtrack on its free speech/no censorship beliefs: Android in China. So please spare me your attempts to be an apologist for Google.


    So your metric is whether or not they censor anything? That's ridiculous. You're essentially saying "don't operate in China period". Which is absurd and doesn't accomplish anything, and was actually the puritanical approach initially taken by Google. I can't think of another company of any consequence that would even contemplate, let alone do, that.

    Now Weibo, instead of Google, is having the positive impact Google had hoped to have. Sometimes taking your toys and going home isn't the best approach.