Truing a bicycle wheel.

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    Dec 05, 2012 1:56 PM GMT
    After ~150 miles of hard trail riding and bumpy downhills, I finally decided to spin the back tire yesterday and look at it. The thing wobbles like pizza dough. icon_lol.gif

    I'm taking it to the shop when it opens in a couple hours to have them true it up for me. While I'm there, I'll get a spoke tool and figure out how to do it myself next time.

    In the meantime, for those who already have experience with this, what 's the best way you know without using a truing stand?
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    Dec 05, 2012 3:49 PM GMT
    Best way that I know is to leave the wheel in the bike and use the brake pads as a guide. When you spin the wheel, the spot that hits the brake pad needs some adjustment. If it hits the pads a ton, the pad probably needs the adjustment.

    This doesn't work if you need hopping though - only truing.
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    Dec 05, 2012 9:36 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidimasrxd pretty much nailed it.

    **thread over**
    I have hydraulic disc brakes...not V/pinch brakes. icon_wink.gif

    **thread open**
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    Dec 05, 2012 9:55 PM GMT
    Good grief. The brake pad is only acting as a visual reference point here. Clamp a pencil onto the stay with the point not quite touching the wheel. Or anything like that.
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    Dec 05, 2012 10:07 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidGood grief. The brake pad is only acting as a visual reference point here. Clamp a pencil onto the stay with the point not quite touching the wheel. Or anything like that.

    ^^ Yes, thank you...that's it exactly. Or you can go old school and use a baseball card.
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    Dec 05, 2012 10:09 PM GMT
    imasrxd said
    mindgarden saidGood grief. The brake pad is only acting as a visual reference point here. Clamp a pencil onto the stay with the point not quite touching the wheel. Or anything like that.

    ^^ Yes, thank you...that's it exactly. Or you can go old school and use a baseball card.
    I saw the pencil trick on youtube, along with a way to use zip ties as well; but I haven't seen the card trick. Explain?
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    Dec 05, 2012 10:15 PM GMT
    all you need is something affixed to the upper stay that comes close to the rim so that you can observe any wobble as you spin the wheel. The example of linear-pull or V-brakes has the brake shoe as the visual reference. As you spin the wheel you watch the distance between the side of the rim, in this case the braking surface, and the face of the brake shoe. When you see a "wobble" you adjust the spoke nuts with the wrench accordingly
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    Dec 05, 2012 10:17 PM GMT
    The obvious and easiest solution would be to just by a new built wheel. like this one, with a sram cassette.

    http://www.enve.com/wheels/road/6.7.aspx
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    Dec 05, 2012 10:19 PM GMT
    uoft23 saidThe obvious and easiest solution would be to just by a new built wheel. like this one, with a sram cassette.

    http://www.enve.com/wheels/road/6.7.aspx
    Road tires on a mountain bike? Great idea!
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    Dec 05, 2012 10:21 PM GMT
    Well if you can't use them, I'll take them off your hands. No point in them going to waste
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    Dec 05, 2012 10:24 PM GMT
    uoft23 saidThe obvious and easiest solution would be to just by a new built wheel. like this one, with a sram cassette.

    http://www.enve.com/wheels/road/6.7.aspx


    WASTE!! you'd spend more on buying a new wheel than you would taking the warped one to a bike mechanic! As long as there is no vertical impact damage (think a dent in the rim from hitting a curb for example) there's little reason to replace the rim. I've warped the back rim on my 3-speed several times and even broken a spoke or two but my mechanic has never had trouble fixing it.

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    Dec 05, 2012 10:28 PM GMT
    RoadsterRacer87 said
    uoft23 saidThe obvious and easiest solution would be to just by a new built wheel. like this one, with a sram cassette.

    http://www.enve.com/wheels/road/6.7.aspx


    WASTE!! you'd spend more on buying a new wheel than you would taking the warped one to a bike mechanic! As long as there is no vertical impact damage (think a dent in the rim from hitting a curb for example) there's little reason to replace the rim. I've warped the back rim on my 3-speed several times and even broken a spoke or two but my mechanic has never had trouble fixing it.



    Stop it, I'm working on getting a 2nd hand never used wheel.
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    Dec 05, 2012 10:32 PM GMT
    A bicycle rim needs both radial & lateral alignment, and equal spoke tension. Side-to-side is just one measurement, with rim roundness another. You can adjust a rim to be perfect laterally, but in terms of roundness it's like a lumpy stone wheel on a Flintstones car.

    It's one of the jobs I really hate, and I usually leave it to the pros with a jig and proper tools, including a spoke tension gauge. I only adjust it myself as a stopgap measure when I find the spokes have gone suddenly slack.
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    Dec 05, 2012 10:32 PM GMT
    uoft23 said
    RoadsterRacer87 said
    uoft23 saidThe obvious and easiest solution would be to just by a new built wheel. like this one, with a sram cassette.

    http://www.enve.com/wheels/road/6.7.aspx


    WASTE!! you'd spend more on buying a new wheel than you would taking the warped one to a bike mechanic! As long as there is no vertical impact damage (think a dent in the rim from hitting a curb for example) there's little reason to replace the rim. I've warped the back rim on my 3-speed several times and even broken a spoke or two but my mechanic has never had trouble fixing it.



    Stop it, I'm working on getting a 2nd hand never used wheel.


    well in that case while you're at it can you see if you can get a new Shimano XTR cassette and sealed brake cables for my Salsa? i need to rebuild it
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    Dec 05, 2012 10:37 PM GMT
    I don't see how I can do that. He doesn't need a new cassette, just a new wheel.
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    Dec 05, 2012 10:48 PM GMT
    RoadsterRacer87 said
    uoft23 saidThe obvious and easiest solution would be to just by a new built wheel. like this one, with a sram cassette.

    http://www.enve.com/wheels/road/6.7.aspx


    WASTE!! you'd spend more on buying a new wheel than you would taking the warped one to a bike mechanic!

    Actually the mech didn't charge me a cent. Maybe he thinks I'm sexy or something? icon_eek.gif
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    Dec 06, 2012 2:28 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    RoadsterRacer87 said
    uoft23 saidThe obvious and easiest solution would be to just by a new built wheel. like this one, with a sram cassette.

    http://www.enve.com/wheels/road/6.7.aspx


    WASTE!! you'd spend more on buying a new wheel than you would taking the warped one to a bike mechanic!

    Actually the mech didn't charge me a cent. Maybe he thinks I'm sexy or something? icon_eek.gif


    strange...how my statement still works? icon_cool.gif
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    Dec 06, 2012 3:17 AM GMT
    The easiest way I've done it was to go to my local bike shop with my wheel(s) and a six pack. Problem solved.
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    Dec 06, 2012 3:17 AM GMT
    RoadsterRacer87 said
    paulflexes said
    RoadsterRacer87 said
    uoft23 saidThe obvious and easiest solution would be to just by a new built wheel. like this one, with a sram cassette.

    http://www.enve.com/wheels/road/6.7.aspx


    WASTE!! you'd spend more on buying a new wheel than you would taking the warped one to a bike mechanic!

    Actually the mech didn't charge me a cent. Maybe he thinks I'm sexy or something? icon_eek.gif


    strange...how my statement still works? icon_cool.gif
    Yep. And I bought a spoke wrench while I was there and trued up the rear wheel on my hybrid this evening, then went for a stroll through the neighborhood. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Dec 07, 2012 11:40 PM GMT
    if you're serious about truing your own wheels, you'd be wise to get a truing stand , the only "real" way to get a good job.. well that and a lot of experience.
    A minor correction can turn into a living nightmare if you're not careful.
  • metatextual

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    Dec 07, 2012 11:43 PM GMT
    SoloXCRacer saidThe easiest way I've done it was to go to my local bike shop with my wheel(s) and a six pack. Problem solved.


    True, works like a charmicon_razz.gif
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    Dec 07, 2012 11:50 PM GMT
    xassantex saidif you're serious about truing your own wheels, you'd be wise to get a truing stand , the only "real" way to get a good job.. well that and a lot of experience.
    A minor correction can turn into a living nightmare if you're not careful.
    That's definitely on my bucket list of bike stuff to get.

    But first I'm getting new pedals and a new fork for my hybrid, new wheels and rotors for my Trek, then putting the Trek's original tires and hydraulic brakes on the hybrid, and getting Avid Elixir X.0 hydraulic brakes for the Trek.

    Then I'll have two kickass mountain bikes. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Dec 07, 2012 11:51 PM GMT
    metatextual said
    SoloXCRacer saidThe easiest way I've done it was to go to my local bike shop with my wheel(s) and a six pack. Problem solved.


    True, works like a charmicon_razz.gif
    I buy so much stuff at my local bike shop, they don't even charge me for service. icon_lol.gif
  • metatextual

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    Dec 07, 2012 11:54 PM GMT
    Hopefully they give you a discount on parts too! Though maybe just the true sight of you is enough for them to lend you a hand.

    icon_confused.gifim terrible at puns
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    Dec 08, 2012 12:00 AM GMT
    metatextual saidHopefully they give you a discount on parts too! Though maybe just the true sight of you is enough for them to lend you a hand.

    icon_confused.gifim terrible at puns
    They're not much on discounts, so I shop online when it's something really expensive.

    And yeah, there's one guy in there who's always VERY happy to see me, and drops everything to work on my bike immediately. icon_lol.gif