Conservative in Wash state and thinking of moving to Texas?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 09, 2012 12:59 AM GMT
    http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2019857998_voters08m.html

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  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 09, 2012 1:37 AM GMT
    http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2019857998_voters08m.html
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    Dec 09, 2012 3:05 AM GMT
    They should consider Mississippi or Alabama, since Texas is now "Purple" and going "Blue".
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 09, 2012 5:42 AM GMT
    Heart breaking, I was close to cry reading it !

    /s
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    Dec 09, 2012 6:06 AM GMT
    GAMRican saidThey should consider Mississippi or Alabama, since Texas is now "Purple" and going "Blue".


    +1
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    Dec 09, 2012 7:04 AM GMT
    I live in a semi affluent area. During the elections, a lot of the uber expensive houses around here had elections signs on their front lawns. Mostly favoring local republican politicians. After the elections were done with, a few of those houses had For Sale signs put up. Could be just coincidence. Or not. icon_lol.gif
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    Dec 09, 2012 1:43 PM GMT
    It's not like the Seattle Times is balanced though, being a right wing rag anyway, how would you expect them to cover the results of the election?
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    Dec 09, 2012 2:08 PM GMT
    ""It's not fun always feeling like an outsider," he said. "

    HA! Well, welcome to our world. How the hell does he think gays have always felt.
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    Dec 09, 2012 2:08 PM GMT
    Steve Beren, a conservative Christian political consultant from Seattle who has run unsuccessfully against U.S. Rep. Jim McDermott, says just because something is celebrated doesn't mean it's right. "I feel bad for those people, because they're celebrating what they're doing wrong," he says.

    He sees the votes as giving license to people to do other things he considers wrong. Each time something "clearly wrong or obviously immoral" is given sanction, celebrated or even ignored, it implicitly sanctions other immoral acts, he says — for example, President Clinton's sexual transgressions.

    Despite seeing the recent votes as moral deterioration, "I don't necessarily buy that it's irreversible," Beren says. "If you go back into history, you'll see they were burning people at the stake and sacrificing children."

    Are you serious, lets also look at history and see who were the people burning innocent lives...hmm, for some reason it can't come to mind...uhh, they thought they were right in their doings too..what did they do..took people from their homes, never to be seen again, tortured and killed them. Murdered innocent women under pretenses of sorcery, by yes, burning them at the stake...but alas I can't think of the name of this organization of killers...hmm it'll come to me.
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    Dec 09, 2012 2:10 PM GMT
    So they want to move? Fine. How about fucking off while you're boxing up the china. And take a few million North Carolinians with you. icon_evil.gif
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    Dec 09, 2012 2:15 PM GMT
    Funny article. I lived in the Seattle area for 5 years, it's where I came out, had my first gay experiences. I arrived as a somewhat conservative Army Colonel, and left as, well... me!

    I loved this quote: "It's hard to always be around people who disagree with me," says Lisa Kennedy. "Abortion, gay marriage — I either have to hold my tongue around them or start an argument."

    Gee, Lisa, maybe you should move to Tennessee. Where even saying the word "gay" in the school system is prohibited. Gays could give you lessons about all the times & places when WE must hold our tongues. Or risk not merely getting into a verbal argument, but a physical altercation, or fired from our jobs, or evicted.

    Yeah, Lisa, I realize you conservatives find it "hard to always be around people who disagree with me". It's called intolerance, and imposing your opinions, beliefs and will on others. The opposite of diversity & acceptance, which are apparently anathema to you.

    Yeah, by all means move to Tennessee or Texas, where I'm sure they'll welcome you with a white robe with your name already embroidered on it. icon_mad.gif
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    Dec 09, 2012 2:58 PM GMT
    Womp wommmmmmp...
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    Dec 09, 2012 3:16 PM GMT
    Well he better move far west Texas if he wants to be running from it! Texas is a changing state at this point. I'll caution him moving down to Houston. It ain't the gays who he should be worry for. The humidity will get you bubba! ( today is 80 in mid December, so foggy the birds are walking).
  • mr_bijae

    Posts: 229

    Dec 09, 2012 3:28 PM GMT
    GAMRican saidThey should consider Mississippi or Alabama, since Texas is now "Purple" and going "Blue".


    While it's true that Texas is becoming a swing state, the majority of rural area's are, and always will be, RED. I lived there for eleven years and outside the municipalities it turns red quick. The only reason that it is becoming a swing state is because the latino population along the border and in the cities of Houston, Dallas, San Antonio are becoming a bigger voting block. Austin has been the blue county within the state for many years. People leaving Washington in the tech industry will be sad to move to Austin since it's very liberal. 15 miles outside of Travis County (where Austin is located) the counties are staunchly red states and will be VERY slow to change.

  • jchris86

    Posts: 20

    Dec 09, 2012 3:37 PM GMT
    As someone who if i had to label myself would be a libertarian i don't understand why the conservatives are opposed to thinks like smoking weed. They are all about or so they say getting the govt out of peoples lives. They talk about the individual's rights. It's why i don't call myself a conservative anymore because if that were really true it would seem things like gay marriage would be the ultimate conservative get the govt out of my life position.
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    Dec 09, 2012 4:08 PM GMT
    mr_bijae said
    GAMRican saidThey should consider Mississippi or Alabama, since Texas is now "Purple" and going "Blue".


    While it's true that Texas is becoming a swing state, the majority of rural area's are, and always will be, RED. I lived there for eleven years and outside the municipalities it turns red quick. The only reason that it is becoming a swing state is because the latino population along the border and in the cities of Houston, Dallas, San Antonio are becoming a bigger voting block. Austin has been the blue county within the state for many years. People leaving Washington in the tech industry will be sad to move to Austin since it's very liberal. 15 miles outside of Travis County (where Austin is located) the counties are staunchly red states and will be VERY slow to change.



    TRUE. But George P. Bush, a nephew of former President George W. Bush, has filed papers indicating that he intends to run for statewide office in Texas.
    If he runs for any high office in Texas, he more likely will get the Latino vote. He is half Mexican, his mom is a Mexican immigrant, he is fluent in Spanish and pro immigration. I see him as a "secret" weapon for the republicans. Plus G.W. Bush as a governor of Texas did a lot for the Latino cumumity. So it might not go blue as expected. Specially Houston and Dallas. San Antonio has the "twins" as a powerful democrat hand.
  • dtx1

    Posts: 155

    Dec 09, 2012 5:13 PM GMT
    A person looking to relocate and be immersed in a more consistently pure conservative state culture should probably bypass Texas. At least based on results from the 2012 presidential election, the following states would be a better bet:

    1. Utah (72.8% voted for Romney, 24.9% for Obama)
    2. Wyoming (69.3% voted for Romney, 28% for Obama)
    3. Oklahoma (66.8% voted for Romney, 33.2% for Obama)
    4. Idaho (64.5% voted for Romney, 32.6% for Obama)
    5. West Virginia (62.3% voted for Romney, 35.5% for Obama)

    These states were followed by (in no order) Kentucky, Tennessee, Kansas, North Dakota, South Dakota, Alabama, Arkansas and Louisiana.

    Following all of the states listed above, Texans voted 57.2% for Romney and 41.4% for Obama.

    I've lived in Texas all but five of my 50 years. Texans are, overall, quite conservative, but not as conservative as the stereotype would seem. It's a big state and is regionally diverse politically. The big cities tend to be more progressive, and the rural areas tend to be more conservative...especially rural East Texas.

    Btw, the states most strongly for Obama? D.C. (91%), Hawaii (70%), Vermont (67%), Rhode Island (62.7%), and New York (62.6%).

  • mr_bijae

    Posts: 229

    Dec 09, 2012 5:31 PM GMT
    may11 said

    Plus G.W. Bush as a governor of Texas did a lot for the Latino cumumity. So it might not go blue as expected. Specially Houston and Dallas. San Antonio has the "twins" as a powerful democrat hand.


    While this is true, Rick Perry has been in office longer than GW and has not done nearly as much for the latino community, which, by in large is the cause of more cities in Texas going blue.
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    Dec 09, 2012 5:37 PM GMT
    dtx1 saidA person looking to relocate and be immersed in a more consistently pure conservative state culture should probably bypass Texas. At least based on results from the 2012 presidential election, the following states would be a better bet:

    1. Utah (72.8% voted for Romney, 24.9% for Obama)
    2. Wyoming (69.3% voted for Romney, 28% for Obama)
    3. Oklahoma (66.8% voted for Romney, 33.2% for Obama)
    4. Idaho (64.5% voted for Romney, 32.6% for Obama)
    5. West Virginia (62.3% voted for Romney, 35.5% for Obama)

    These states were followed by (in no order) Kentucky, Tennessee, Kansas, North Dakota, South Dakota, Alabama, Arkansas and Louisiana.

    Following all of the states listed above, Texans voted 57.2% for Romney and 41.4% for Obama.

    I've lived in Texas all but five of my 50 years. Texans are, overall, quite conservative, but not as conservative as the stereotype would seem. It's a big state and is regionally diverse politically. The big cities tend to be more progressive, and the rural areas tend to be more conservative...especially rural East Texas.

    Btw, the states most strongly for Obama? D.C. (91%), Hawaii (70%), Vermont (67%), Rhode Island (62.7%), and New York (62.6%).



    West Virginia doesn't seem to fit in with the rest of that list. I think they only voted for Romney because coal is their one trick pony economically. Oklahoma for sure though, since that state gives me the creeps, but I do not know about Utah, Wyoming or Idaho.
  • mr_bijae

    Posts: 229

    Dec 09, 2012 5:39 PM GMT
    dtx1 saidA person looking to relocate and be immersed in a more consistently pure conservative state culture should probably bypass Texas.


    What you're missing here is Texas, like Washington does not have a state income tax.. It's not so much the conservatism they seek as it is a tax shelter.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14372

    Dec 09, 2012 5:50 PM GMT
    GAMRican saidThey should consider Mississippi or Alabama, since Texas is now "Purple" and going "Blue".
    In your dreams, Texas will always be a red, republican state. The religious extremists will always have a tight grip on state, county and local governments in the lone star state. Mississippi and South Carolina will become purple swing states long before Texas makes any serious attempt. The OP has chosen the right state to relocate since his home state has become too uncomfortably progressive and open minded.
  • mr_bijae

    Posts: 229

    Dec 09, 2012 5:57 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob (a Yankee) said
    GAMRican saidThey should consider Mississippi or Alabama, since Texas is now "Purple" and going "Blue".
    In your dreams, Texas will always be a red, republican state. The religious extremists will always have a tight grip on state, county and local governments in the lone star state. Mississippi and South Carolina will become purple swing states long before Texas makes any serious attempt. The OP has chosen the right state to relocate since his home state has become too uncomfortably progressive and open minded.


    I thought the same thing until I saw the break down of counties in the last election...

    gQFCA.png

    Combine that with increasing tax rates in California, currently 13.5%, the dichotomy of the state is changing. More cities are not only becoming more hispanic they are becoming more Californian. Soon it will be like Oregon, where liberal Portland carry's the vote over an other wise conservative state.
  • dtx1

    Posts: 155

    Dec 09, 2012 6:05 PM GMT
    mr_bijae said
    dtx1 saidA person looking to relocate and be immersed in a more consistently pure conservative state culture should probably bypass Texas.


    What you're missing here is Texas, like Washington does not have a state income tax.. It's not so much the conservatism they seek as it is a tax shelter.


    Yeah, in listing the top five conservative states by presidential vote, I was focusing more on the overall culture of conservatism rather than the economic dimension.

    Considering the tax issue, living in Texas would be of greatest benefit for higher income persons. For the majority of Texans, the benefit of no state income tax is almost erased by our high sales tax and notably high property taxes...two taxes that disproportionally affect lower and middle income persons.
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    Dec 09, 2012 6:07 PM GMT
    Rural Texas will always be conservative just like every other state. Even rural California and rural New York are Conservative.
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    Dec 09, 2012 6:12 PM GMT
    Caslon22000 said""It's not fun always feeling like an outsider," he said. "

    HA! Well, welcome to our world. How the hell does he think gays have always felt.


    I know. I almost died reading that. Not only is it laughable he's saying that in relationship to minority's getting rights, but that we're expected to feel sorry for the hegemonic king of the world (WASP).