76 Percent Favor 'Cutting Government Spending Across the Board'

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 11, 2012 1:59 PM GMT
    http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/76-percent-favor-cutting-government-spending-across-board_665257.html
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14310

    Dec 11, 2012 5:32 PM GMT
    That is a US issue therefore it is none of your damned business. Go find something newsworthy in Toronto, Canada.
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    Dec 11, 2012 6:31 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidThat is a US issue therefore it is none of your damned business. Go find something newsworthy in Toronto, Canada.


    Thank you again for your overwhelmingly useful contributions. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Dec 11, 2012 6:39 PM GMT
    That has to be the most hilariously obvious attempt to game a poll. Unsurprising that it's by the Weekly Standard. icon_lol.gif
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    Dec 11, 2012 6:49 PM GMT
    Christian73 saidThat has to be the most hilariously obvious attempt to game a poll. Unsurprising that it's by the Weekly Standard. icon_lol.gif


    Gaming a poll? You apparently also are unable to read or click through on links.

    http://images.politico.com/global/2012/12/07/121207_battlegroundpoll.html

    The poll was done by the left leaning Politico - and it was a direct quote from #35 when it comes to "cutting government across the board"
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    Dec 11, 2012 6:58 PM GMT
    Ask them specific questions (even while you ask them a meaningless question like "across the board cuts"), and people answer.
    Same poll viewed with a somewhat less biased take:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/fiscal-cliff-poll-tax-increases-spending-cuts-medicare-social-security-rich-obama-boehner-2012-12
    The survey respondents side more with the President on two crucial issues — they favor raising taxes on incomes above $250,000 and don't think it would harm the economy, and they don't favor many specific spending cuts.

    According to the poll, 60 percent of respondents favored raising taxes on incomes above $250,000. Even more — 65 percent — want taxes raised on "large corporations." Meanwhile, 58 percent of respondents also said that they believed these tax increases wouldn't harm the economy.

    The tax increases, of course, are the central part of Obama's plan for a deal. He has said he won't sign a bill that doesn't include them. Boehner and other Republicans say the increases would harm the economy — but at least so far, the public doesn't appear to be buying it.

    The survey respondents also said they would support the blanket idea of "cutting spending across the board." When asked for specifics, however, most said they would only be willing to reducing Medicare or Social Security benefits for higher-income earners. The idea of raising the retirement age for Social Security benefits is unpopular, as only 33 percent support it. Defense cuts are also not viewed favorably.


    Questions 28-36 are relevant here. Question 37 is on raising taxes above 250k and its effect on the economy.
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    Dec 11, 2012 7:07 PM GMT
    q1w2e3 saidAsk them specific questions (even while you ask them a meaningless question like "across the board cuts"), and people answer.
    Same poll viewed with a somewhat less biased take:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/fiscal-cliff-poll-tax-increases-spending-cuts-medicare-social-security-rich-obama-boehner-2012-12
    The survey respondents side more with the President on two crucial issues — they favor raising taxes on incomes above $250,000 and don't think it would harm the economy, and they don't favor many specific spending cuts.

    According to the poll, 60 percent of respondents favored raising taxes on incomes above $250,000. Even more — 65 percent — want taxes raised on "large corporations." Meanwhile, 58 percent of respondents also said that they believed these tax increases wouldn't harm the economy.

    The tax increases, of course, are the central part of Obama's plan for a deal. He has said he won't sign a bill that doesn't include them. Boehner and other Republicans say the increases would harm the economy — but at least so far, the public doesn't appear to be buying it.

    The survey respondents also said they would support the blanket idea of "cutting spending across the board." When asked for specifics, however, most said they would only be willing to reducing Medicare or Social Security benefits for higher-income earners. The idea of raising the retirement age for Social Security benefits is unpopular, as only 33 percent support it. Defense cuts are also not viewed favorably.


    Questions 28-36 are relevant here. Question 37 is on raising taxes above 250k and its effect on the economy.


    Er, across the board cuts are pretty specific. Various tax increases are also supposedly supported - but this doesn't take away that the largest number of people supported "cutting government across the board".
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    Dec 11, 2012 7:12 PM GMT
    "Across the board cuts" have the same specificity as the Republicans' offer of eliminating tax deductions. icon_lol.gif

    People need to do the NY Times puzzle on balancing the budget before answering such polls.
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    Dec 11, 2012 7:20 PM GMT
    q1w2e3 said"Across the board cuts" have the same specificity as the Republicans' offer of eliminating tax deductions. icon_lol.gif

    People need to do the NY Times puzzle on balancing the budget before answering such polls.


    Oddly the Republican plan was specific - and let people take what they wanted to a maximum. It was simple and easy to understand. Across the board cuts can also be taken as they are - across the board.

    And with respect to the NYTimes puzzle, the WSJ one just came out with one that specifically identifies the most recent options as raised by the CBO.
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    Dec 11, 2012 7:34 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    Christian73 saidThat has to be the most hilariously obvious attempt to game a poll. Unsurprising that it's by the Weekly Standard. icon_lol.gif


    Gaming a poll? You apparently also are unable to read or click through on links.

    http://images.politico.com/global/2012/12/07/121207_battlegroundpoll.html

    The poll was done by the left leaning Politico - and it was a direct quote from #35 when it comes to "cutting government across the board"


    Q beat me to it.

    And Politico isn't "left leaning" unless you're comparing it to Mussolini....
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    Dec 12, 2012 12:35 AM GMT
    riddler78 said
    q1w2e3 said"Across the board cuts" have the same specificity as the Republicans' offer of eliminating tax deductions. icon_lol.gif

    People need to do the NY Times puzzle on balancing the budget before answering such polls.


    Oddly the Republican plan was specific - and let people take what they wanted to a maximum. It was simple and easy to understand. Across the board cuts can also be taken as they are - across the board.

    And with respect to the NYTimes puzzle, the WSJ one just came out with one that specifically identifies the most recent options as raised by the CBO.


    And yet the revenues from capping deductions won't nearly be enough as to getting rid of specific deductions. One low-end estimate puts extra revenue at $450billion over 10 years, if one exempts charitable giving and incomes below $250k/yr.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/cap-on-tax-deductions-would-do-little-to-trim-debt-white-house-report/2012/11/29/5fc286a0-3a3e-11e2-a263-f0ebffed2f15_story.html

    "Across the board" cuts are almost like the negotiations I have with my patients every day. They all want fewer medications, and some of them say, x meds and no more. Well, life doesn't work that way. You have to specify what to cut, e.g. the PPI for acid-reflux is optional, but the anti-rejection med is not.

    Sequestration is, after all, "across the board" cuts.
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Dec 12, 2012 1:50 AM GMT
    Dear Riddler

    How are things in Costa Repiblicana ?
    I know information is kinda hard to come by but just to let you know?
    You guys lost Big
    Americans here don't want cuts to Medicare
    They don't want cuts the Social Security
    and when you say things like "Across the Board"? We know that's a right wing jingo-ism

    Did you happen to come across the poll on how many Americans want the Bush Tax cuts on the wealthy to expire?

    Naah ... I bet you didn't
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    Dec 12, 2012 4:36 PM GMT
    q1w2e3 said
    riddler78 said
    q1w2e3 said"Across the board cuts" have the same specificity as the Republicans' offer of eliminating tax deductions. icon_lol.gif

    People need to do the NY Times puzzle on balancing the budget before answering such polls.


    Oddly the Republican plan was specific - and let people take what they wanted to a maximum. It was simple and easy to understand. Across the board cuts can also be taken as they are - across the board.

    And with respect to the NYTimes puzzle, the WSJ one just came out with one that specifically identifies the most recent options as raised by the CBO.


    And yet the revenues from capping deductions won't nearly be enough as to getting rid of specific deductions. One low-end estimate puts extra revenue at $450billion over 10 years, if one exempts charitable giving and incomes below $250k/yr.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/cap-on-tax-deductions-would-do-little-to-trim-debt-white-house-report/2012/11/29/5fc286a0-3a3e-11e2-a263-f0ebffed2f15_story.html

    "Across the board" cuts are almost like the negotiations I have with my patients every day. They all want fewer medications, and some of them say, x meds and no more. Well, life doesn't work that way. You have to specify what to cut, e.g. the PPI for acid-reflux is optional, but the anti-rejection med is not.

    Sequestration is, after all, "across the board" cuts.


    Er no, there's a case to be made for a x% cut across the board. And that's very much viable. And as for deductions it's not "little" - if you bothered to actually look at the CBO options as presented, it's part of a potential solution but not all of it. Even taxes to the highest income earners by this definition would do "very little" - so you might want to have a look at that math.
  • mybud

    Posts: 11819

    Dec 14, 2012 1:58 AM GMT
    I have to say I totally disagree with riddler's political views ...but this forum is here to share political views and mindsets...He has the right to post...I have the right to disagree....
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 14, 2012 3:00 AM GMT
    Really, who the hell cares what 76% of Americans think? Americans, irrespective of their political views, tend not to be very rational thinkers

    According to PPP, one in four voters, for example, expressed a view on the nonexistent Panetta-Burns Commission.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2012/12/04/one-in-four-americans-has-an-opinion-about-an-imaginary-debt-plan/

    I think this whole polling fetish, which I can't stand, was started by not very intelligent "journalists" and politicians so that they could avoid discussing real issues.
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    Dec 15, 2012 12:10 AM GMT
    Sometimes public opinion does not dictate good policy. A perfect example is gay marriage. When large money comes into play and easily sways opinions, then disparities occur between what voters want and what is needed to occur.

    We know that huge cuts across the board will just further divide the classes and reek havoc on the middle class. We've already seen what happened when cuts of healthcare and education were made.