Half Marathon Training

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    Dec 16, 2012 2:12 PM GMT
    I have 40 days left before my next Half Marathon. I have been working hard on long runs, weights, and abs. I am worried I am over training and getting injured before the race, any suggestions? I want to crush my PR on this race.
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    Dec 16, 2012 3:42 PM GMT
    GLG1 saidI have 40 days left before my next Half Marathon. I have been working hard on long runs, weights, and abs. I am worried I am over training and getting injured before the race, any suggestions? I want to crush my PR on this race.


    What does your current training week look like?
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Dec 16, 2012 5:06 PM GMT
    No advice but just want to wish you good luck. I was a runner before but have since leave the sport behind. One day I find my motivation to run again. Lately I keep registering for a run , but dont show during racing day.
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    Dec 16, 2012 5:10 PM GMT
    I know lots of folks have done this... but am considering for the first time this coming year. I'd be interested in training info that folks found helpful. Thanks!
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    Dec 16, 2012 6:59 PM GMT
    It is efficient to have a strong core and relative strength for the upper body (swinging those arms gets tiresome after some time!). I don't think you are over training from what you are saying, but don't underestimate rest. No worries, and do work!
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2603

    Dec 16, 2012 7:30 PM GMT
    Your training regime on your profile looks a bit excessive for a half marathon to me, but it does depend on the intensity you`re working at.
    I`ve read that training for a running event should be running two miles for every mile of the event; at most, twenty six miles a week. But approaching the event, put in some ten mile plus runs to take you up to the distance.
    About a week out from the event, begin to reduce the distance, etc., and no running ie rest the last few days.

    Hope this helps and good luck!

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    Dec 16, 2012 7:48 PM GMT
    Someone asked what my work out routine is during the week. It is similar to what I have done before for other big races. I try to run five times a week with one big run on Sat. Working my up to a couple 13.1 runs two weeks before the race. Longest at this point is 15k. The shorter runs are 10k, and try make one of those 7 or 8 miles.

    For weights. I am doing a lot of ab focus and back focus, as well dumb bells and push ups for arms. that is 3 or 4 times a week. Also getting planks and medicine ball for the abs with this workout. I have also added yoga once a week,
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    Dec 17, 2012 1:04 PM GMT
    GLG1 saidSomeone asked what my work out routine is during the week. It is similar to what I have done before for other big races. I try to run five times a week with one big run on Sat. Working my up to a couple 13.1 runs two weeks before the race. Longest at this point is 15k. The shorter runs are 10k, and try make one of those 7 or 8 miles.

    For weights. I am doing a lot of ab focus and back focus, as well dumb bells and push ups for arms. that is 3 or 4 times a week. Also getting planks and medicine ball for the abs with this workout. I have also added yoga once a week,


    As long as it is consistent, and you aren't pushing more than a 10% increase in running week over week I wouldn't think you are over training but a big part of overtraining is where your base fitness is at.
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    Dec 18, 2012 2:51 AM GMT
    Whatever you do be careful. The older you are the slower it takes to heal your wound. Just increase your limit a little bit at a time.
  • matthieu17

    Posts: 101

    Dec 18, 2012 3:14 AM GMT
    This is perhaps a matter of personal preference, but I like to set my longest run >two weeks away from race day. I generally run my last near race distance (marathon) or at race distance (20K races or less) three weeks out.

    I don't think I can comment adequately on your training volume. That really depends on your body, your experience racing, and how you respond best. I do adhere to the 10% rule as best I can when training and find that this, among other things, has helped me prepare well and stay uninjured through a few ultras, as well as marathons and halfs.

    Best of luck!
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    Jan 07, 2013 11:31 PM GMT
    Thanks. What is the 10% rule, I have heard of that? I have 19 days left and plan on 2 more big runs before then. At the moment I am injury free.
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    Feb 03, 2013 1:29 PM GMT
    1:53:36
  • NHLFAN

    Posts: 370

    Feb 03, 2013 1:42 PM GMT
    GLG1 said1:53:36



    Congrats on competing the race in a good time. Did you beat your PR?
  • savman69

    Posts: 16

    Feb 03, 2013 6:37 PM GMT
    I just did my fourth half marathon yesterday, I'm a runner i do as much all the races in savannah. i run 3 times a week , for two day i will run 5 miles and the third day i will do 7. i make the the last run of the week a big one,
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    Feb 04, 2013 8:37 AM GMT
    1:53 is a decent time, and it sounds like you got the PR, so congratulations! That is a great feeling! Now, the tough-love answer:

    Ditch the weights and the core training. Unless you're incredibly deficient in either area, that work doesn't do your running a lick of good. Slowly build up to 70-80 miles per week, with a 15-17-mile long run. If that feels good, go even higher (if it feels bad, 60 is fine). The 10 percent rule means that you don't want to increase your weekly mileage by more than 10 percent from one week to the next during build up. It's a good rule.

    Hold that training volume for as many months as you can stand. Two months from the race, swap out one easy day for a 4-mile run at half marathon pace (with ample warm-up and, especially, cool down). As the race gets even closer, swap out one weekly easy day for an intensity day (perhaps 5 - 6 x 1000m at 10K pace, again with warm-up and cool-down). One week before the race, cut back and recover. I guarantee you'll crush the PR and probably take your running to heights you've never imagined.

    But you may very well decide it's not worth it, and there's nothing wrong with that.