'I Am Adam Lanza's Mother': A Mom's Perspective On The Mental Illness Conversation In America

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 16, 2012 7:00 PM GMT
    Sad.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/16/i-am-adam-lanzas-mother-mental-illness-conversation_n_2311009.html

    More here at the original blog:
    http://anarchistsoccermom.blogspot.com/2012/12/thinking-unthinkable.html
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 16, 2012 7:33 PM GMT
    My uncle was a total lunatic off his meds. On his meds he lived in his hallucinogenic world quite peacefully. But when the meds went off he needed hospitalization. But only he could admit himself. Once my mother faked a call from president Clinton and told him Clinton wanted him to go into the hospital. He went. You don't disobey the president. He used to own a foot locker full of knives, as I remember.

    There is no telling such people that there hallucinogenic world is not real. They perceive it just as you and I perceive our world.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 17, 2012 7:05 PM GMT
    A counter opinion:
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/2869272

    What I would dispute is that conservatives are opposed to all government involvement in healthcare. At its core, when it comes to healthcare, economic conservatives object to the unintended consequences of third party payor systems (ie if your insurer or government pays for all your bills, it's effectively "free" and the incentive is that you consume more than you need to). Ideologically then it's about personal responsibility and ensuring the incentives are better placed.

    When it comes to mental healthcare, and those who need it most fall into the category of those who don't have the capacity for personal responsibility. It's therefore the role of society and government to ensure that those who do have the capacity for personal responsibility have the safety and ability to exercise their rights.

    There are some reasonable safeguards for automatic weaponry already - which are restricted. A number of myths however prevail:
    http://washingtonexaminer.com/tim-carney-media-myths-on-assault-weapons-and-semiautomatic-firearms/article/2516156

    Clearly we need better mechanisms to identify those who need help - but barring this, think of the unthinkable and safeguard those of us in society who are most vulnerable - kids. While I think it's a natural reaction to cringe when thinking that more guns are the solution, it's clear that "gun-free" zones don't help and instead only provide a false sense of security - given that the only people following these rules are not going to go on rampages anyway. Meanwhile there are a number of examples of sprees that have been stopped by civilians - given that police cannot nor should they be omnipresent.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 17, 2012 8:24 PM GMT
    More responses here (rebuttals):
    http://thegirlwhowasthursday.wordpress.com/2012/12/16/you-are-not-adam-lanzas-mother/

    http://freethoughtblogs.com/ashleymiller/2012/12/14/when-you-tie-shootings-to-mental-illness/
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3284

    Dec 17, 2012 10:55 PM GMT
    Caslon22000 saidMy uncle was a total lunatic off his meds. On his meds he lived in his hallucinogenic world quite peacefully. But when the meds went off he needed hospitalization. But only he could admit himself. Once my mother faked a call from president Clinton and told him Clinton wanted him to go into the hospital. He went. You don't disobey the president. He used to own a foot locker full of knives, as I remember.

    There is no telling such people that there hallucinogenic world is not real. They perceive it just as you and I perceive our world.


    One of the unintended consequences of HIPA laws and privacy. Is that if a health care provider or a family member is concerned about an adult without the consent of that adult NOTHING happens.

    As in your uncle case your mother had to lie to do the right thing. Many doctors and psychiatrists have to break the rules to attempt to do the right thing.