So what are YOU reading right now?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 16, 2008 4:16 AM GMT
    All politics aside guys, I'm interested in what you are all reading?

    I typically go for the biographies and business books, and of course Political Science garb, but this summer I strayed and loved it!!!

    I read the whole Twilight series and Host by Stephanie Meyer (I just have a weakness for sweet vampire sex) and am now delving into a new book I saw the other day at Borders, "The book of Fate" by Brad Meltzer. I literally just started it and I think it might be good, but tell me what you are all getting into, and if not something new, what do you read that really gets you going, what gets the fire burning in your belly that you just can't wait to turn the next page?
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    Sep 16, 2008 6:14 AM GMT
    I just finished up 1984, after having to break from that book about 5 years ago. It was making me a little paranoid. Now I'm about finished with Frankenstien. After that I'm not too sure what I'll read. I have some Dragonlance books waiting for me, or a couple of non-fictions I need to get around to yet.
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    Sep 16, 2008 6:38 AM GMT
    activist.jpg

    The Activist: John Marshall, Marbury v. Madison, and the Myth of Judicial Review

    by Lawrence Goldstone

    The story of the landmark case that put the “Supreme” in Supreme Court.

    Among the many momentous decisions rendered by the Supreme Court, none has had a greater impact than that passed down in 1803 by Chief Justice John Marshall in the case of Marbury v. Madison. While the ruling itself was innocuous—denying the plea of a minor functionary named William Marbury on constitutionally technical grounds—its implications were enormous. For Marshall had, in essence, claimed for the Supreme Court the right to determine what the Constitution and our laws under it really mean, known formally as the principle of “judicial review.” Yet, as Lawrence Goldstone shows in his compelling narrative, that right is nowhere expressed in the Constitution and was not even considered by the Framers or the Founding Fathers, who would never have granted such power in a checks-and-balances system to unelected officials serving for life.

    The Activist underscores the drama that occurred in 1803 by examining the debates that took place during the Constitutional Convention of 1787—among the most dramatic moments in American history—over the formation and structure of our judicial system. In parallel, Goldstone introduces in brief the life and ambition of John Marshall, and the early, fragile years of the Supreme Court, which—until Marshall’s ascension to Chief Justice—sat atop the weakest of the three branches of government. Marshall made the Court supreme, and while judicial review has been used sparingly, without it the Court would likely never have intervened in the 2000 presidential election. Indeed, the great irony Goldstone reveals is that judicial review is now so enfranchised that Justice Antonin Scalia could admit, as he has, that the Supreme Court “made it up” in the same breath as he insists that justices must adhere steadfastly to the exact words of the Constitution.

    Nobody brings the debates of the Constitutional Convention to life as does Lawrence Goldstone, and in this election year, no more interesting book on the Supreme Court will appear than The Activist, which makes the past come alive in the present.

  • ASH557

    Posts: 112

    Sep 16, 2008 6:44 AM GMT
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  • glenn77

    Posts: 17

    Sep 16, 2008 7:01 AM GMT
    I just started this not too long ago... on page 100 icon_smile.gif

    Photobucket
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    Sep 16, 2008 7:12 AM GMT
    Practical Demon keeping icon_biggrin.gif
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    Sep 16, 2008 7:20 AM GMT
    I'm re-reading a great book by Harry Farrell entitled Swift Justice which describes the kidnapping of the son of a San Jose, California department store owner, and tells how a band of vigilantes stormed the town jail and hanged the kidnappers in the town square as ten thousand people watched. This is a controversial book depicting a chapter of 1933 San Jose history. The author interviewed many of the people involved for his book - an excellent read.


    books?id=8TFYPA-u4QkC&printsec=frontcove
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    Sep 16, 2008 7:42 AM GMT
    I'm reading this thread right now.

    IN4DAWIN!
  • Abe13

    Posts: 155

    Sep 16, 2008 11:10 AM GMT
    I am reading several.
    Ascension Magick by Christopher Penczak
    Amazonia by James Rollins-rather good book on the undiscovered parts of South America, fiction but still good.
    The Books of Blood 1-3 by Clive Barker.
    I am a book nerd I guessicon_wink.gif
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    Sep 16, 2008 11:57 AM GMT
    "The Wings Of The Dove" by Henry James;

    "Ransom" by Lee Rowan (a gay romance/adventure novel taking place in Nelson's Navy in 1799).
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    Sep 16, 2008 1:16 PM GMT
    I'm reading a bunch of crap for school.

    But free reading consists of My War: Killing Time in Iraq by Colby Buzzell. The book has journal entries and lots of reminiscing about his time in Iraq and what drove him to join the Army. The author is a totally rad guy. He skates and listens to Slayer and Black Flag (thus the "My War" title). I'm only about a third through the book, but it's awesome.

    "Dear Mom and Dad,

    You were right.

    I should have gone to college instead.

    Love,

    Colby"
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    Sep 16, 2008 1:57 PM GMT
    Currently finishing up "The Garden of Eden" by Hemmingway. Wasn't too sure I'd like it, but it drew me in.
    Over the summer I've also read: The Charioteer, The Palace Thief, Ender's Game, Life of Pi, Twilight, and Meditations by Marcus Aurelius.
    I'm also in the middle of "The Potawatomi: Keepers of the Fire" and "Unfinished Tales 2" by Tolkien.
  • joggerva

    Posts: 731

    Sep 16, 2008 1:58 PM GMT
    Just finished this:

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    and it is highly recommended. I think I want to read something easy next, probably a Stephen King book I bought and never got around to....
  • ajnelson18

    Posts: 6

    Sep 16, 2008 2:22 PM GMT
    Reading: When You Are Engulfed In Flames (David Sedaris)
    Just Read: Code of Conduct (Rich Merritt)

    Have been amazed with InsightOut Books for cheap prices and quick delivery. Check 'em out: http://www.insightoutbooks.com
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    Sep 16, 2008 4:59 PM GMT
    Water for Elephants, just finished Pillars of the Earth
  • OptimusMatt

    Posts: 1124

    Sep 16, 2008 5:08 PM GMT
    Just about any Sword of Truth novel by Terry Goodkind.

    I wanna be Richard. Sigh.

    Currently:
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    le sigh - so far today, 5 hours worth of review questions, and another 5 hours to go. :S
  • ShawnTX

    Posts: 2484

    Sep 16, 2008 5:12 PM GMT
    I'm about to start 'When You Are Engulfed In Flames' By David Sedaris
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 16, 2008 5:29 PM GMT
    Various short stories by Lovecraft.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 16, 2008 5:31 PM GMT
    I'm reading Real Jock Forums right NOW!!! icon_razz.gif
  • gregory548

    Posts: 48

    Sep 16, 2008 6:17 PM GMT
    im reading Karel Capek: RUR
    its a czech author and btw in this book the word robot was used for the first time.
    and i have to read Lolita
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 16, 2008 6:38 PM GMT
    Augusten Burroughs, Dry.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 16, 2008 6:40 PM GMT
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    It's an old favorite by one of my teachers at the University of Chicago. Awesome book if you ever want to get a look at political protest in Japan before Emperor Hirohito died. It tells the stories of a storeowner in Okinawa who burned the Japanese Flag in protest at a sporting event, a Christian woman in Yamaguchi who went to the Japanese Supreme Court to fight for the right to NOT have her husband deified at Yasukuni Shrine where the war heros are honored, and the Mayor of Nagasaki who, in 1988, became the first elected Japanese politician to publicly blame WWII and the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the dying Emperor.
  • SanEsteban

    Posts: 454

    Sep 17, 2008 12:37 AM GMT
    I have three books going. Don Quioxte, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, and Devil in the White City. Just finished Portrait of Dorian Gray and Apocalypse 2012. God, I love to read!