Why do some people not consider Florida a part of the south?

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    Dec 18, 2012 5:59 PM GMT
    I've heard so many people say we aren't really a part of the deep south. I heard this recently. I chuckled because we are as far south you can go until you hit Cuba. I don't really get the thought process behind this though.
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    Dec 18, 2012 6:02 PM GMT
    MashogaNubianPrince saidI've heard so many people say we aren't really a part of the deep south. I heard this recently. I chuckled because we are as far south you can go until you hit Cuba. I don't really get the thought process behind this though.


    Its actually only the northern part of the state that is southern. We consider our area to be more of South Georgia than a part of Florida. That is due the conservative way of life more associated with the south.
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    Dec 18, 2012 6:03 PM GMT
    At least from Lakeland-Winter Haven to points north and west, it's certainly deep enough for me! icon_lol.gif
  • roadbikeRob

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    Dec 18, 2012 6:04 PM GMT
    Florida is a southern state, period.
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    Dec 18, 2012 7:48 PM GMT
    geographically, of course
    Politically, not so much.
    I've heard people call it an island since it is so much more diverse and accepting than its neighboring states. I don't know where you live but the bigger cities are nothing like the deep south

    Florida: the more north you go the more south it gets!
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    Dec 18, 2012 9:08 PM GMT
    MashogaNubianPrince saidI've heard so many people say we aren't really a part of the deep south. I heard this recently. I chuckled because we are as far south you can go until you hit Cuba. I don't really get the thought process behind this though.

    Because Deep South is often equated with the Old South, the slave-owning antebellum South. Florida hadn't been developed at that time, mostly uninhabited. A road system to the southern half of the State didn't exist, and there is no north-south river system. Transportation and contact with the US was by sea. Key West was a small naval outpost established to deal with pirates, and the main industry there was "wrecking", that is, salvage operations for ships that foundered in the waters between Florida and Cuba.

    Therefore, the history of Florida does not parallel that of the Deep South, which evolved in colonial times 200 years earlier. Florida didn't begin to flourish until the dawn of the 20th Century, when rail service was introduced, in turn leading to the land boom of the 1920s, and the growth of tourism, agriculture & ranching. Most of the new residents came from other parts of the US, there was very little native-born population that had existed prior to that time. The remote location and largely inhospitable living conditions didn't permit it prior to the 20th Century.
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    Dec 18, 2012 9:20 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidFlorida is a southern state, period.



    did you not even try to think deeper than geographical? I know you have it in you, right? Or do you not know a thing about Florida, particularly the parts that are considered conservative country southern?
  • Webster666

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    Dec 18, 2012 11:11 PM GMT
    The states that are proud to remain stuck in the pre Civil War era are considered "The South."
    That would exclude Florida.

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    Dec 18, 2012 11:23 PM GMT
    Webster666 saidThe states that are proud to remain stuck in the pre Civil War era are considered "The South."
    That would exclude Florida.



    Not in my experience. Many native Floridians still hate Yankees, the attitudes are obvious. But they're very happy to take your money. The only good thing about Florida, in my opinion, is that it's warm there when it's cold here in NY. Nothing else about it appeals to me. I visit my family there once or twice a year, and can't wait to leave. I even gave Miami a chance, went there one year ago for 4 days. And it rained, for 4 days. Very disappointing. I guess me and Florida aren't meant to be.
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    Dec 19, 2012 3:06 AM GMT
    The rest of America prefers to think that Florida doesn't exist. icon_lol.gif
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    Dec 19, 2012 3:11 AM GMT
    I've always thought it was that people don't consider Miami to be a southern city (when it clearly is lol) because they have a different accent and a diverse culture or whatever...icon_confused.gif
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    Dec 19, 2012 3:11 AM GMT
    Phoenyx saidgeographically, of course
    Politically, not so much.
    I've heard people call it an island since it is so much more diverse and accepting than its neighboring states. I don't know where you live but the bigger cities are nothing like the deep south

    Florida: the more north you go the more south it gets!


    I agree with the last part but whats funny is that in a lot of places in South Florida I've been to places where you woulda swore you were on the set of True Blood lol.

    If you don't live in the northern part it pretty much is an island in terms of if there's a hurricane or other natural disaster you can only go up.
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    Dec 19, 2012 3:13 AM GMT
    BlackCat90 saidI've always thought it was that people don't consider Miami to be a southern city (when it clearly is lol) because they have a different accent and a diverse culture or whatever...icon_confused.gif


    I hate the Miami accent. Its like if Gomer Pyle had a love child with Rosie Perez. That is what Miami people sound like to me lol
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    Dec 19, 2012 3:15 AM GMT
    What?

    icon_confused.gif
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    Dec 19, 2012 3:20 AM GMT
    xrichx saidThe rest of America prefers to think that Florida doesn't exist. icon_lol.gif

    So what part of America is coming down here and clogging our airports, our roads, our beaches, our hotels? Are they all coming to a place they think doesn't exist?
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    Dec 19, 2012 3:32 AM GMT
    Blakes7 said
    Webster666 saidThe states that are proud to remain stuck in the pre Civil War era are considered "The South."
    That would exclude Florida.



    Not in my experience. Many native Floridians still hate Yankees, the attitudes are obvious. But they're very happy to take your money. The only good thing about Florida, in my opinion, is that it's warm there when it's cold here in NY. Nothing else about it appeals to me. I visit my family there once or twice a year, and can't wait to leave. I even gave Miami a chance, went there one year ago for 4 days. And it rained, for 4 days. Very disappointing. I guess me and Florida aren't meant to be.


    I have met so many redneck men here in Florida. If you go to St. Cloud, Bithlow or parts of West Cocoa you wont even remember you're in Florida lol.
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    Dec 19, 2012 3:54 AM GMT
    MashogaNubianPrince saidI hate the Miami accent. Its like if Gomer Pyle had a love child with Rosie Perez. That is what Miami people sound like to me lol

    Well that's original. LOL! But I still don't know what that would sound like, nor can I hear a Miami accent, despite living here now but having previously lived all over the US, and heard all kinds of accents. I can hear a Seattle accent, a Minneapolis, a Nawlins, but... Miami?
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    Dec 19, 2012 3:57 AM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    MashogaNubianPrince saidI hate the Miami accent. Its like if Gomer Pyle had a love child with Rosie Perez. That is what Miami people sound like to me lol

    Well that's original. LOL! But I still don't know what that would sound like, nor can I hear a Miami accent, despite living here now but having previously lived all over the US, and heard all kinds of accents. I can hear a Seattle accent, a Minneapolis, a Nawlins, but... Miami?


    The Miami accent is like an almost slightly Hispanic yet still sort of Southern version of a New York accent. I can hear it because I'm from Central Florida which is more of a southern accent but some people have an almost Midwestern accent.
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    Dec 19, 2012 4:08 AM GMT
    MashogaNubianPrince saidThe Miami accent is like an almost slightly Hispanic yet still sort of Southern version of a New York accent. I can hear it because I'm from Central Florida which is more of a southern accent but some people have an almost Midwestern accent.

    Well, I can understand the blending of the Cuban & New York City accents - that's who mostly settled here in recent years. Not sure where Midwestern would come from, except during tourist season.

    When I first started coming here in the early 1970s, before the Cuban boatlift influx, the accent was decidedly NYC. In fact, very much NYC Jewish. With some French Canadian, when they were buying up lots of beachfront businesses here, especially around Hollywood. I could go into bars there and everyone was speaking French, switching to English with a peculiar French-Canadian accent.

    Well, anyway, I'll try to listen for a Miami accent. I was in Miami Beach Monday night for a party, missed a chance. Will try again when I return from New Hampshire, which has its own accent (Noo Hamshah).
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    Dec 19, 2012 4:10 AM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    MashogaNubianPrince saidThe Miami accent is like an almost slightly Hispanic yet still sort of Southern version of a New York accent. I can hear it because I'm from Central Florida which is more of a southern accent but some people have an almost Midwestern accent.

    Well, I can understand the blending of the Cuban & New York City accents - that's who mostly settled here. Not sure where Midwestern would come from, except during tourist season.

    When I first started coming here in the early 1970s, before the Cuban boatlift influx, the accent was decidedly NYC. In fact, very much NYC Jewish. With some French Canadian, when they were buying up lots of beachfront businesses here, especially around Hollywood. I could go into bars there and everyone was speaking French, switching to English with a peculiar French-Canadian accent.

    Well, anyway, I'll try to listen for a Miami accent. I was in Miami Beach Sunday night for a party, missed a chance. Will try again when I return from New Hampshire, which has its own accent (Noo Hamshah).


    I have heard many native Floridians who sound a mix of southern and Midwestern. Its a nice blend. Give me a deep voiced beefy voiced hairy man with that accent and I'm on my back with my body ready, lol.
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    Dec 19, 2012 4:15 AM GMT
    MashogaNubianPrince saidGive me a deep voiced beefy voiced hairy man with that accent and I'm on my back with my body ready, lol.

    I can give you that, minus the hairy. I took voice training to sound neutral midwestern, and lose my dreadful native New York-New Jersey accent. Except when I say words like kawfee, tawk, wawk, which betray my origins. icon_sad.gif
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    Dec 19, 2012 4:42 AM GMT
    This sentiment stems from a time when most South Floridians or their parents originated from the New York area. (Central and particularly North Florida were still considered "the south.") Now it seems that most South Floridians or their parents originated from, er, points south of Miami.
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    Dec 19, 2012 4:42 AM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    MashogaNubianPrince saidGive me a deep voiced beefy voiced hairy man with that accent and I'm on my back with my body ready, lol.

    I can give you that, minus the hairy. I took voice training to sound neutral midwestern, and lose my dreadful native New York-New Jersey accent. Except when I say words like kawfee, tawk, wawk, which betray my origins. icon_sad.gif


    I've been told I sound like Ellie May Clampett if she moved to Compton instead of Beverly Hills lol
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    Dec 19, 2012 6:29 AM GMT
    Once you're south of Tallahassee it is no longer considered 'deep south'.

    If you wanna get real prideful about it...alot of deep grassroots see a triumvirate: Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia. They consider them to be the "purebred" states. Northern Florida is the spill over from those states, and why it's considered part of the deep south. My family, for the most part based in Alabama, still owns sections of land from Jackson to Bay County.

    It's really hard to explain how southerners see two different Florida's, unless you've got alot of time to listen to someone explain connections that pre-date the civil war.
  • LJay

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    Dec 19, 2012 6:42 AM GMT
    Having lived in Florida, I subscribe to a story that goes like this:

    Florida began as a paradise. It was discovered by a group of wanderers who then moved into the paradise and made it just like their home territory, which was New Jersey.