Happy Holidays driving on ice edition!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 20, 2012 3:35 PM GMT
    Holiday time means ice time in many parts of the USA. And since most states don't have winter tire requirements like Canada we get drivers like these:



    This one is just one highway ramp...
  • Machina

    Posts: 419

    Dec 20, 2012 6:45 PM GMT
    That Interstate 64 ramp seems to be the "Silver-Car-Killer". In other words, if you live in West Virgina, own a silver car, and need to drive during inclement weather, avoid that ramp at all costs!

    I love these videos! It's my favorite part of the holiday season!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 20, 2012 7:08 PM GMT
    The first video is Seattle. Near downtown, many streets are only missing a chairlift and blue-diamond signs for great fun.

    Search for Youtube vids from last year's "snowmageddon"

    We have "microclimates" around the county where it's just rain here in Bellevue. But, go 10 miles north and its snow. Catches people by surprise.

    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=seattle+snowmageddon&oq=seattle+snowmageddon
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Dec 20, 2012 7:37 PM GMT
    I watched only part of the first video. That was enough to show that the driver had never learned how to drive on ice. I grew up in Wisconsin and Minnesota and have driven hundreds of miles on ice, but many people never learn how to drive on ice.

    First of all, let us consider how friction works. Generally, the static coefficient of friction is greater than the dynamic coefficient of friction. That means that the friction between the tires and the road is greatest just before the tires start spinning or sliding. Thus, one should avoid spinning or sliding the wheels. If the wheels spin, one should cut the power then apply power much more gradually, ideally applying power just short of what would cause spinning. The only exception is that if there is only a very thin layer of ice on the pavement, one may melt through the ice to the pavement if one spins the wheels. If one is fortunate to have a manual transmission, one can start in 2nd gear to make it easier to apply power more carefully.

    Similarly with sliding, unless one has anti-lock brakes, if the wheels slide, one should release the brakes then immediately apply them more gently, ideally just hard enough so that they do not slide; that is called threshold braking.

    If one continues to spin the wheels while the car stands still, the wheels will dig deeper into the snow or ice thereby making it more likely that the car will become stuck in which case one may never get out without help. If one has a manual transmission, it may be possible to rock the car out. That cannot be done with modern automatic transmissions, but with some automatic transmissions made no later than the middle 1950s (Hydramatics and PowerGlides), one can often rock the car out by very gently pressing the accelerator and moving the selector between low and reverse.

    It's amazing that so many people, despite having lived in the snow belt for many years, have never learned how to drive under winter conditions. Driver incompetence is common.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Dec 20, 2012 7:39 PM GMT
    Machina saidThat Interstate 64 ramp seems to be the "Silver-Car-Killer". In other words, if you live in West Virgina, own a silver car, and need to drive during inclement weather, avoid that ramp at all costs!

    I love these videos! It's my favorite part of the holiday season!



    That driver is incompetent. If he understood the laws of physics, he'd know better than to spin the wheels. He should apply power just short of spinning the wheels.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Dec 20, 2012 7:45 PM GMT
    ATC84 saidHoliday time means ice time in many parts of the USA. And since most states don't have winter tire requirements like Canada we get drivers like these:



    This one is just one highway ramp...


    Some of those drivers did very well, but others were incompetent.

    Driving under those conditions takes iron-clad self-discipline to avoid following one's natural instincts to apply too much power or brake too hard. It also requires knowing how to drive on ice and snow.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Dec 20, 2012 7:54 PM GMT
    yourname2000 said



    Stupid idiots! They continued to spin their wheels, digging them deeper and deeper into the snow, thereby making it impossible to get out without help.


    If the car won't move forward then, instead of spinning the wheels, shift to reverse and apply power gently!! If the car won't move backwards, then, instead of spinning the wheels, try to move forward. By continually moving backwards and forwards, it is often possible to get out without help. If not, stop trying! If you keep trying, you'll just dig yourself in deeper and deeper. Instead, get out the shovel; every competent driver has a shovel and sand in the car for winter driving. Shovel a path in front of the tires to make it possible to move forward. Next, consider putting sand in front of the driving wheels. Then, try driving out, applying power gently!!

    Above all, always apply power gently and try to avoid spinning the wheels!! Stupid idiotic drivers drive for years without ever figuring that out thereby causing problems for drivers who know how to drive on snow and ice.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 20, 2012 8:05 PM GMT
    I live in Charleston and drive that area a lot. People wreck there in dry conditions! Why? Because they drive faster than their abilities! Too fast for the road, too.

    Just because you passed your driving test & got a license doesn't mean you know how to drive.

    Elevated roadway, over & near a river....perfect for wrecking conditions.
    There have been big-rigs wreck there a lot, one or two cars go over the retaining wall and land below. Three lanes of traffic with an off ramp & on-ramp combined in less than the span of the bridge and most on-ramp traffic wants over while most already-on traffic wants to merge right in 1/'2 mile (doncha know you can't move over later, you have to pick your lane 3 miles back and never move out of it! icon_rolleyes.gif )

    The curve warns of 50MPH and shows a pic of an tractor-trailer tipping over, but most drivers would do well to heed the sign, since they have no clue about "powering out" of a curve, or even what to do when a slide begins.

    Local body shops love the area & I don't blame them. Fortunately, the first good snowfall takes out the idiots and the rest of the winter they are car-less. icon_lol.gif

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 20, 2012 8:10 PM GMT
    And this is why, the day after our big snow storm, I'm staying inside.

    Not because I'd slide on ice, but because drivers in Nebraska are fucking TERRIBLE.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 20, 2012 8:17 PM GMT
    When I was a kid and every gas station had a garage and a tow truck, those families used to hang out weekends, with their tow trucks on the "juicy" corners on the highway to the ski areas. They could make enough extra cash for a good holiday.

    But now the highway has been straightened and widened and all the mom & pop operations are gone.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 20, 2012 8:43 PM GMT
    This little pile up happened a couple of years ago here in my home town! Winters here can be pretty fun, lol.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 20, 2012 9:48 PM GMT
    ATC84 saidHoliday time means ice time in many parts of the USA. And since most states don't have winter tire requirements like Canada we get drivers like these:


    This one is just one highway ramp...


    I pass through Charleston often on my way home to South Carolina. Will be going through again this Saturday. I'm not heartened by the fact that there's snow in the forecast. And I know exactly where this is....and will be careful.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 20, 2012 10:38 PM GMT
    joelryn saidThis little pile up happened a couple of years ago here in my home town! Winters here can be pretty fun, lol.



    Ha! I remember that clip.

    The Fusion driver was the only downhill driver doing anything right by avoiding braking and just sliding around everyone.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Dec 21, 2012 1:03 AM GMT
    yourname2000 said^^^ It's not lost on you that this is an ad to sell snow tires, yeah? icon_eek.gif


    It doesn't matter. People actually do drive like that.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Dec 21, 2012 1:07 AM GMT
    StudlyScrewRite said I live in Charleston and drive that area a lot. People wreck there in dry conditions! Why? Because they drive faster than their abilities! Too fast for the road, too.

    Just because you passed your driving test & got a license doesn't mean you know how to drive.

    Elevated roadway, over & near a river....perfect for wrecking conditions.
    There have been big-rigs wreck there a lot, one or two cars go over the retaining wall and land below. Three lanes of traffic with an off ramp & on-ramp combined in less than the span of the bridge and most on-ramp traffic wants over while most already-on traffic wants to merge right in 1/'2 mile (doncha know you can't move over later, you have to pick your lane 3 miles back and never move out of it! icon_rolleyes.gif )

    The curve warns of 50MPH and shows a pic of an tractor-trailer tipping over, but most drivers would do well to heed the sign, since they have no clue about "powering out" of a curve, or even what to do when a slide begins.

    Local body shops love the area & I don't blame them. Fortunately, the first good snowfall takes out the idiots and the rest of the winter they are car-less. icon_lol.gif



    Here in the U.S. of A., it's far too easy to get a license to drive. In addition to much better driver training, we should have periodic re-testing and better enforcement of traffic laws. People would be capable of driving much better and more safely if they were really interested in doing so and learning how, but incentives to do so are insufficient.

    There are also places where roads could be improved and better marked.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 21, 2012 1:09 AM GMT
    ICE

    TEXAS STYLE

  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Dec 21, 2012 2:08 AM GMT
    Have you been driving responsibly in one of those scenarios on a sketchy road and had your ass end slide out from under you and you go willy nilly while you're in three lanes of high speed traffic? I have! It ended well but I'm sure I will not live as long as I was supossed to from the duress on my heart!