Mass. Democrat Admits Absentee Voter Fraud

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 21, 2012 1:41 PM GMT
    Apparently not so much of a myth...

    http://livewire.talkingpointsmemo.com/entry/mass-democrat-admits-absentee-voter-fraud
  • billbos

    Posts: 68

    Dec 21, 2012 2:15 PM GMT
    This was 3 years ago in a town that is a small community outside of Boston. Of course voter fraud happens, but this hardly seems like a ground breaking story.
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Dec 21, 2012 3:30 PM GMT
    No one said it doesn't exist



    I live in Miami
    Come here where the republicans sign up people who are in Nursing homes and contract out people to work on National Campaigns to throw out voter registration forms

    But apparently that doesn't fit into your storyline
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    Dec 24, 2012 12:33 AM GMT
    riddler78 saidApparently not so much of a myth...

    http://livewire.talkingpointsmemo.com/entry/mass-democrat-admits-absentee-voter-fraud

    When did anyone ever say voting fraud was a myth? It has always been around and always will be. And while we should take reasonable steps to curb it, the problem is that the recent steps to supposedly counter act voter fraud were designed not to prevent voting fraud, but to intentionally disenfranchise legitimate voters in VIOLATION of the US Constitution, as multiple judges have ruled.

    Anyway, your concern is rich given that you're in a country (China) that is woefully lacking in a democratic tradition. How about you worry about democracy at home?
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    Dec 24, 2012 1:51 AM GMT
    sfbayguy said
    riddler78 saidApparently not so much of a myth...

    http://livewire.talkingpointsmemo.com/entry/mass-democrat-admits-absentee-voter-fraud

    When did anyone ever say voting fraud was a myth? It has always been around and always will be. And while we should take reasonable steps to curb it, the problem is that the recent steps to supposedly counter act voter fraud were designed not to prevent voting fraud, but to intentionally disenfranchise legitimate voters in VIOLATION of the US Constitution, as multiple judges have ruled.

    Anyway, your concern is rich given that you're in a country (China) that is woefully lacking in a democratic tradition. How about you worry about democracy at home?


    Disenfranchising voters? Yes because showing ID is so onerous and disenfranchising especially when even states that do require ID provide it for free. So now you think the US should compete with China for voting rights? As for the country I'm in - I'm currently in the US, Boston fwiw, but generally in Canada - which does in fact require you to show ID to vote.
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    Dec 25, 2012 2:55 AM GMT
    riddler78 said
    sfbayguy said
    riddler78 saidApparently not so much of a myth...

    http://livewire.talkingpointsmemo.com/entry/mass-democrat-admits-absentee-voter-fraud

    When did anyone ever say voting fraud was a myth? It has always been around and always will be. And while we should take reasonable steps to curb it, the problem is that the recent steps to supposedly counter act voter fraud were designed not to prevent voting fraud, but to intentionally disenfranchise legitimate voters in VIOLATION of the US Constitution, as multiple judges have ruled.

    Anyway, your concern is rich given that you're in a country (China) that is woefully lacking in a democratic tradition. How about you worry about democracy at home?


    Disenfranchising voters? Yes because showing ID is so onerous and disenfranchising especially when even states that do require ID provide it for free. So now you think the US should compete with China for voting rights? As for the country I'm in - I'm currently in the US, Boston fwiw, but generally in Canada - which does in fact require you to show ID to vote.

    You know full well it wasn't just about ID, but obtaining an ID.

    "Nationally, strict photo ID laws will have the harshest impact on already marginalized populations. Studies have shown that 25 percent of African-Americans, 16 percent of Hispanics, and 18 percent of individuals over 65 do not even have the documents required to gain the proper photo identification mandated in new voter ID laws." (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/benjamin-todd-jealous/the-state-of-pennsylvania_b_1821445.html)

    US compete with China for voting rights? What in the world are you talking about? And I was going based on your frequenting of China. Anyway, when the average Chinese citizen can vote for their leaders (locally AND in Beijing), then get back to me.
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    Dec 25, 2012 3:07 AM GMT
    sfbayguy said
    riddler78 said
    sfbayguy said
    riddler78 saidApparently not so much of a myth...

    http://livewire.talkingpointsmemo.com/entry/mass-democrat-admits-absentee-voter-fraud

    When did anyone ever say voting fraud was a myth? It has always been around and always will be. And while we should take reasonable steps to curb it, the problem is that the recent steps to supposedly counter act voter fraud were designed not to prevent voting fraud, but to intentionally disenfranchise legitimate voters in VIOLATION of the US Constitution, as multiple judges have ruled.

    Anyway, your concern is rich given that you're in a country (China) that is woefully lacking in a democratic tradition. How about you worry about democracy at home?


    Disenfranchising voters? Yes because showing ID is so onerous and disenfranchising especially when even states that do require ID provide it for free. So now you think the US should compete with China for voting rights? As for the country I'm in - I'm currently in the US, Boston fwiw, but generally in Canada - which does in fact require you to show ID to vote.

    You know full well it wasn't just about ID, but obtaining an ID.

    "Nationally, strict photo ID laws will have the harshest impact on already marginalized populations. Studies have shown that 25 percent of African-Americans, 16 percent of Hispanics, and 18 percent of individuals over 65 do not even have the documents required to gain the proper photo identification mandated in new voter ID laws." (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/benjamin-todd-jealous/the-state-of-pennsylvania_b_1821445.html)

    US compete with China for voting rights? What in the world are you talking about? And I was going based on your frequenting of China. Anyway, when the average Chinese citizen can vote for their leaders (locally AND in Beijing), then get back to me.


    I note that you're the one who keeps comparing the US to China - as if China is an example to follow. It's pretty much impossible to do much of anything in China without any ID.

    Did you follow the links to the studies on the difficulty of gaining proper photo identification? It doesn't show what the author suggests it does. It doesn't say that these Americans can't get the documents, it just suggests that there are costs largely in time because of distances required to get the identification. Other countries and regions make it easier to get photo ID - so why not the US? Why is the objection to photo ID or any ID rather than trying to find solutions to making it cheaper given that not having ID leads to other forms of disenfranchisement in society anyway?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 29, 2012 9:14 AM GMT
    riddler78 said
    sfbayguy said
    riddler78 said
    sfbayguy said
    riddler78 saidApparently not so much of a myth...

    http://livewire.talkingpointsmemo.com/entry/mass-democrat-admits-absentee-voter-fraud

    When did anyone ever say voting fraud was a myth? It has always been around and always will be. And while we should take reasonable steps to curb it, the problem is that the recent steps to supposedly counter act voter fraud were designed not to prevent voting fraud, but to intentionally disenfranchise legitimate voters in VIOLATION of the US Constitution, as multiple judges have ruled.

    Anyway, your concern is rich given that you're in a country (China) that is woefully lacking in a democratic tradition. How about you worry about democracy at home?


    Disenfranchising voters? Yes because showing ID is so onerous and disenfranchising especially when even states that do require ID provide it for free. So now you think the US should compete with China for voting rights? As for the country I'm in - I'm currently in the US, Boston fwiw, but generally in Canada - which does in fact require you to show ID to vote.

    You know full well it wasn't just about ID, but obtaining an ID.

    "Nationally, strict photo ID laws will have the harshest impact on already marginalized populations. Studies have shown that 25 percent of African-Americans, 16 percent of Hispanics, and 18 percent of individuals over 65 do not even have the documents required to gain the proper photo identification mandated in new voter ID laws." (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/benjamin-todd-jealous/the-state-of-pennsylvania_b_1821445.html)

    US compete with China for voting rights? What in the world are you talking about? And I was going based on your frequenting of China. Anyway, when the average Chinese citizen can vote for their leaders (locally AND in Beijing), then get back to me.


    I note that you're the one who keeps comparing the US to China - as if China is an example to follow. It's pretty much impossible to do much of anything in China without any ID.

    Did you follow the links to the studies on the difficulty of gaining proper photo identification? It doesn't show what the author suggests it does. It doesn't say that these Americans can't get the documents, it just suggests that there are costs largely in time because of distances required to get the identification. Other countries and regions make it easier to get photo ID - so why not the US? Why is the objection to photo ID or any ID rather than trying to find solutions to making it cheaper given that not having ID leads to other forms of disenfranchisement in society anyway?

    I'm not comparing the US to China, I'm telling you to worry about its democracy, or lack thereof, before worrying about the US' democracy.