Low Pulse, High Blood Pressure

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    Dec 23, 2012 5:45 PM GMT
    Is anyone else in this boat? Has anyone talked to a doctor about it? My pulse is in the mid-40s (46) . . . my blood pressure is about 135 over 85.

    My mother once told me that once she hit 40, her blood pressure just got higher: nothing else changed, not diet or activity level.

    I'm wondering if there's something I should do. Quit salt? Eat more chocolate? Get married?

    If anyone else has comparable numbers, I'd be into hearing what (if anything) you think/do about it.
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    Dec 23, 2012 10:24 PM GMT
    Remember a rule of thumb: no of 100+your age
    If you are concerned see your doctor.
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    Dec 23, 2012 10:26 PM GMT
    Maybe you should see a doctor just to be safe! icon_smile.gif
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    Dec 23, 2012 10:34 PM GMT
    If you're concerned, always, always see a doc.
    If you are physically fit and run a lot, a pulse in the mid 40's and 50's reflects just that. It can mean that your heart is very efficient, but again, I am not a doctor.
    Your BP is measured by a baseline. Do you know what yours is? If yours is drifting upward to say, 140/90 - consistently - then you could be considered pre-hypertensive and your doc can start talking to you about how to approach that. I think that this has changed as of lately and 140/90 can be considered as hypertension.
    Above all, don't mess with this and see your provider.
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    Dec 23, 2012 10:35 PM GMT
    See your primary care physician just for safety's sake.
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    Dec 23, 2012 10:36 PM GMT
    Ask your physician about the blood pressure. (And get your choleterol levels checked as well.) High blood pressure is not good - but those of us who are not physicians can't say whether your blood pressure is high. Doctors today ARE prescribing statin drugs for people with much lower cholesterol readings than they did in the recent past, and there are no doubt newer remedies for high blood pressure. If you have high blood pressure, it also increases your risk of stroke.
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    Dec 23, 2012 11:08 PM GMT
    Looking at you, your low heart rate is probably due to good cardiovascular conditioning, and is probably normal for you. An EKG could confirm that your heart's pacemaker is intact and the electricity traveling through your heart is moving normally.

    The elevated blood pressure is in "pre-hypertension" range. If you don't have huge salt intake, it is probably essential hypertension that is genetic, and is likely to worsen with age. Always check your BP when calm and relaxed. If the systolic (top) number remains above 130 everytime you check, it's time to start some medications. A trend in your BP is more valuable than 1 or 2 readings, so I'd check morning and night for a week, and then see your doctor. I start most of my young patients on a low-dose water pill, which is very easy to tolerate with few side effects, and will correct your BP easily.
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    Dec 23, 2012 11:23 PM GMT
    Sound's like your are trending towards essential hypertension. Might want to through some some flaxseed oil (3000 mg daily) into your diet. ACA recommends this (http://theheart.org). Lowered sodium, and lowered fats can help, too.

    Meds, would be next. ACE inhibs are cheap. $4.00 monthly. ARBs are more specific but much more costly. I take Benicar, in varied doses.

    Get a CMP. Your doctor may want you on a statin but there's been lots of negative research on statins lately.
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    Dec 23, 2012 11:40 PM GMT
    Thanks for the excellent reply, Oozyrate.

    I checked three times. Once it was mid-120s, the other two times it was mid-130s. (They just put in a machine at my gym.) My salt intake is probably higher than it should be, so maybe I should start by looking at that . . . though I don't think I'm holding on to much water.

    I had a big heart test this summer, because my doctor thought I had a bundle branch break, but it just turned out to be "athletes heart" and no problem. (I guess it was an ultrasound they did on my heart.) At that time, my blood pressure didn't worry her . . . but during the test it was in the mid-120s, not 130s.

    Well, I'll check it every time I go to the gym for a week, though I imagine it would have to be real serious before I take any medication for it. . . .
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    Dec 23, 2012 11:41 PM GMT
    Thanks, Chucky; that's helpful stuff.

    I do some flaxseed, but I'll do some more . . . seems like it helps with all sorts of things. I have a very lowfat diet, so I'm thinking that's not so much an issue.

    I definitely don't want to start taking pills, though.
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    Dec 24, 2012 12:25 AM GMT
    http://www.theheart.org/article/1470929.do

    This is a huge deal in the cardiac community. Consider theheart.org a reliable source.

    Since starting flaxseed, many days, I just do a multi-dose vitamin, and low dose aspirin.
  • barriehomeboy

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    Dec 24, 2012 12:29 AM GMT
    Um, no the internet is not your first source of information. Your Doctor is. Go see him. We're just a bunch a gay guys pretending to be jocks.
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    Dec 24, 2012 12:52 AM GMT
    I recently set my gp doc down, along with an intern, for 45 minutes, on the realities of bodybuilding.

    Nothing could be further from the truth. Doctors are are like any other students: they receive a base education on the science and method of the day. Many times they are not up to date, nor, were they every trained on off label uses, etc.

    You're wrong. Just how it is.

    My cardiac doctor uses theheart.org., and, he listens to me, as well. He's a good doctor, and he was in the military as a cardiologist and has done 1000's of cases. That's why he knows to listen to the patient.

    By all means trained personnel should be consulted, but, one needs to take an active role in their own health care.

    A paramedic telling me my elevated ST needs me in a level 3 center was wrong. I called the cardiologist, He said, "Chest hurt?" I said "No." He said, "Go home." I did. Cost saving $115,000.

    Another doctor had me on HCTZ. I repeatedly told him, "You're making me too dry." His response..."You need that." I insisted on a CMP. Guess what? I was absolutely right. My sodium was low.

    Patients are often RIGHT.

    You have to educate yourself to know when to question a person who could be wrong.

    Many medical professionals can't be expected to know your situation or understand it. Often, you have to educate them. Many have knowledge that is plain wrong or decades old.

    If you suspect a doctor of incompetence, he probably is.

    DO YOUR OWN RESEARCH, TOO...ALWAYS.

    BE AN ACTIVE PARTICIPANT IN YOUR OWN HEALTH CARE!

    In my reference to flaxseed, my cardiologist had read the very same article :-).

    Sometimes, health care professionals, need direction. They are not gods. They are only educated and have experience. They don't know everything.

    Sources like heart.org, theheart.org, and others operated by the medical community contain great information for medical professionals and lay people, too.

    In fact, large case databases, and Internet diagnoses are improving the quality of health care globally for thousands of under served communities.

    Of course, that does not mean to listen to some crap from some mom pop organic holistic site!
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    Dec 24, 2012 1:25 AM GMT
    RunnerBen saidIs anyone else in this boat? Has anyone talked to a doctor about it? My pulse is in the mid-40s (46) . . . my blood pressure is about 135 over 85.

    My mother once told me that once she hit 40, her blood pressure just got higher: nothing else changed, not diet or activity level.

    I'm wondering if there's something I should do. Quit salt? Eat more chocolate? Get married?

    If anyone else has comparable numbers, I'd be into hearing what (if anything) you think/do about it.


    This is prehypertension. It has to do with your genetic factor, diet, stress level, and physical activities. 135/85 is not that high. Also you have to have more than one visit and a consistent numbers of high BP to be regarding as high BP or Hypertension. Your pulse is low. There could be problem with nerve conduction and electrolytes in your body. Chances are you need EKG or Blood work to determine the problem. Low pulse is common if you are an athlete or a consistent runner/ people who does cardiovacular exercise very often.
    I do not think you should worry about the Blood pressure, but more about your pulse.
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    Dec 24, 2012 1:42 AM GMT
    Pulse rate will generally be lower with lower muscle mass (less nutrition to move around). A resting heart rate in the mid 40's is very good for someone the age of the original poser and given he runs and only weighs 145 would be considered ideal by many clinicians. (Go research this yourself, if you don't concur.)

    For someone very active, and fairly light, 46 BPM would be considered awesome by most folks in the know. My resting heart rate was 43 in my late 20's, and early 30's.

    The new standard for ideal blood pressure is 120/80, which is different from the old standard of 140/90. As a practical matter, in men, with much mass, it's hard to attain 120/80 without the heart rate coming way up, and being medicated. In my personal situation, because I carry nearly 190 pounds of lean muscle we shoot for 130/80, which keeps my heart rate down. If I lower my bp further, my heart rate comes up (I still have the same muscle to keep fed.).

    This morning, since I have been sick and not exercised in the last few days, but, am getting better today, my bp was 112/70, at 69, when I first got up.

    Blood pressure directly can mean several things: cardio vascular disease among them, fluid volume, exercise intensity, kidney disease, electrolyte imbalance, etc.

    If I dehydrate, I can sometimes see my bp at 100/55, but my heart rate will come up to 110.

    There are all sorts of interactions.

    Given the poster's age, and weight, his bp is probably headed towards essential hypertension, but, because he is light, and active, may involve minor diet changes. NOW is the time to do that, rather than later.

    Every once in a while, when all the things come together, I can have spot on blood pressure and heart rate, but, it's tricky, and sometimes I don't even realize what did it.

    Sodium needs to be less that 2G a day (try getting it there if you eat out at all.).

    You need to be well hydrated. Studies show less than 15% of athletes are fully hydrated.

    It's likely time to look at lipids. Our plumbing gets clogged up.

    Pre-hypertension is what this looks like from someone who has been down this path, personally, Might be real easy to fix. Might not be.

    Hypertension damages your eyes, kidneys, and forces LDLs onto the the wall of your cardiovascular system....bad news.

    Some folks get "white coat syndrome" at the doctor, and get high readings at the doctor's office. Go buy a blood pressure monitor at Walmart. Your blood pressure will generally be highest in the evenings and after eating. Check it four times a day. If you're seeing above 130/80 on average, you need to devise a plan of intervention.
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    Dec 29, 2012 3:56 AM GMT
    its quite possible that the machine is wrong.... have an actual professional take it...

    best of luck
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    Dec 29, 2012 4:35 AM GMT
    Hey Chuck,

    My experience with doctors isn't so different than your own. It would be ideal to have a doctor who does sports medicine as a GP.

    But I've cut out all additional salt . . . like table salt on top of stuff. (I still eat products with salt in them.

    It's been about five days, and I'm good like this. I'm going to wait a few months, then see if there's any change.