Any Vegan RJers?

  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Dec 25, 2012 12:07 AM GMT
    So I am looking into adopting a vegan diet. I'm hoping there are a couple of you out there who are already vegan who have some some tips for someone considering this transition.

    I did some poking around online and found quite a few Vegan athletes who say the diet has done wonders for them. Like Mac Danzig, have you seen this guy? He looks incredible! So I am taking some of his diet recommendations and I was looking to supplement that with some other opinions. I hope there are some out there.
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    Dec 25, 2012 3:36 AM GMT
    Just do a search on "vegan" and "vegetarian." They're all on there, as are their detractors taunting them with bacon.
  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Dec 25, 2012 5:23 PM GMT
    eagermuscle saidJust do a search on "vegan" and "vegetarian." They're all on there, as are their detractors taunting them with bacon.


    No worries, I am doing that, I was wondering if there was anyone on here who had any experience with it.
  • cute_guy26

    Posts: 2

    Dec 27, 2012 6:42 AM GMT
    I am a vegetarian, but can't really help you in regards to protein uptake, etc for gym exercise.

    All I've observed from shifting to a vegetarian diet since two years ago is better mental acuity, stronger perceptive ability to understand situations better as they come, a more positive emotional outlook on life, and a much faster healing rate from injuries.

    It also makes you more sensitive to how quickly your muscles get injured during exercise. When I was on a meat based diet, I had more strength, but the muscles would get sore the next day (one day too late) and so I had to wait two days for it to recover fully. On a vegan diet, they would actually get sore as soon as they did, and because of that, you don't suffer from muscle soreness the next two days. It makes you look weaker at first, but in hindsight, you actually did improve from the exercises faster.

    That's my take on it all. Oh and a much tastier cum load :p
  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Dec 27, 2012 12:30 PM GMT
    I've been a vegetarian for awhile so I'm used to alot of the perks of the vegetarian diet. I have become so reliant on cheese and eggs to augment my protein intake, I'm just curious how feasible it is. I've been watching videos and reading blogs and articles from vegan athletes and I'm convinced it can be done. I just hope I can find another athlete that I can actually talk to about it.

    I did notice I don't get sore like most other people, at least not in the same way. If I get sore at all it seems to be a day or so after. I never really associated that with the vegetarian diet, I just thought it was how my body was. I've been vegetarian for... damn.. I think about 19 years now.

    Thanks for the info though!
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    Dec 27, 2012 12:45 PM GMT
    Awkward moment when youre so tired, you read "vegan" as "virgin" and sus out the topic for shits and giggles, only to be disappointed by a thread that does not share my opinion on bacon
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    Dec 27, 2012 12:50 PM GMT
    Oddly enough, I go Vegan every once in a while. I got odd cravings. icon_razz.gif
  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Dec 27, 2012 10:45 PM GMT
    melbourne92 saidAwkward moment when youre so tired, you read "vegan" as "virgin" and sus out the topic for shits and giggles, only to be disappointed by a thread that does not share my opinion on bacon


    Trust me, I do share your opinion on bacon
  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Dec 27, 2012 10:46 PM GMT
    JRaRJ saidOddly enough, I go Vegan every once in a while. I got odd cravings. icon_razz.gif


    so when you say "go vegan" what do you mean? How are you finding the right fats and proteins?
  • matthieu17

    Posts: 101

    Dec 27, 2012 11:12 PM GMT
    I've been a vegan for 8+ years... I've actually lost count, it might be more. I was omnivorous before that and went vegan from one day to the next. I enjoy cooking and playing around with new recipes so the change in what I ate wasn't difficult.
    Initially I dropped a few pounds which was unwanted in my case, but I started making minor adjustments like cooking with coconut oil, having avocado with just about anything that seemed to go with it. The impossibility/difficulty of getting enough protein, in my opinion, is the great vegan myth of all times. After years of giving long-winded answers to this I've settled upon a one sentence response that generally suffices: The tempeh that I eat has as much protein as 5 eggs... or an other examples. All of which lead to this response: icon_eek.gif

    I'm happy to offer help or answer any of your questions.

    Addendum: Since I just downed a triple-decker PB&J I thought of this. The biggest changes that I've noticed since going vegan is recovery time, as another poster mentioned but also my cravings for food are terribly precise, rather than a generalised 'must have food now' which used to result in shoveling anything down within an arm's length. I got really hungry a few minutes ago and knew that what I really wanted was the sandwich that has now been reduced to a few crumbs.
  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Dec 28, 2012 11:55 AM GMT
    not_superman saidToday's MOTD is vegan or close to vegan.


    I don't understand your post
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    Dec 28, 2012 12:09 PM GMT
    The healthy diet part of being a vegan is easy!

    The hard part is being questioned (at best) for the rest of your life by people who can't or won't understand why you're vegan at all.


  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Dec 28, 2012 12:11 PM GMT
    matthieu17 saidI've been a vegan for 8+ years... I've actually lost count, it might be more. I was omnivorous before that and went vegan from one day to the next. I enjoy cooking and playing around with new recipes so the change in what I ate wasn't difficult.
    Initially I dropped a few pounds which was unwanted in my case, but I started making minor adjustments like cooking with coconut oil, having avocado with just about anything that seemed to go with it. The impossibility/difficulty of getting enough protein, in my opinion, is the great vegan myth of all times. After years of giving long-winded answers to this I've settled upon a one sentence response that generally suffices: The tempeh that I eat has as much protein as 5 eggs... or an other examples. All of which lead to this response: icon_eek.gif

    I'm happy to offer help or answer any of your questions.

    Addendum: Since I just downed a triple-decker PB&J I thought of this. The biggest changes that I've noticed since going vegan is recovery time, as another poster mentioned but also my cravings for food are terribly precise, rather than a generalised 'must have food now' which used to result in shoveling anything down within an arm's length. I got really hungry a few minutes ago and knew that what I really wanted was the sandwich that has now been reduced to a few crumbs.


    This is excellent, I cook alot too, so the cooking adventure is something I'm willing to undertake.I made a quinoa and raw veggie salad last night that came out amazing. So that's encouraging, as well as the vegan lasagna recipe I have coming up.

    I will have to do some research on tempeh, I'm not sure it's something stores carry in the area, so I may have to make it myself. I already make my own seitan which is delicious, but because of the wheat gluten I guess I should be avoiding it.

    It's encouraging to hear that you have been a practicing vegan for 8 years and from the looks of your pictures with a great deal of success. I aspire to be more lean, so I'm still trying to figure out the balance of diet vs exercise. Thanks for the information, I will look more into tempeh. Are there any other high protein items in your diet you rely heavily on?
  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Dec 28, 2012 12:13 PM GMT
    JJGreen saidThe healthy diet part of being a vegan is easy!

    The hard part is being questioned (at best) for the rest of your life by people who can't or won't understand why you're vegan at all.




    I've been a vegetarian for years, so I'm used to how ridiculous people can be about it. I don't honestly give a shit. I'll keep eating my leafy greens and watch them all get fatter and sicker with a smile on my face. lol
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    Dec 28, 2012 11:51 PM GMT
    Started in February, feels awesome.

    There is a lot of temptation out there but after a while it gets easy. The key is not to suddenly quit because you accidentally ate cheese or fell for a craving and ate a burger.

  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Dec 29, 2012 12:33 PM GMT
    I've been slowly adding in some vegan meals through out the day, reading the diets of vegan athletes and incorporating some of their meals into my diet regimen. I'm planning on making a slow transition. So we'll see how it goes. So DO you feel like switching to vegan has changed your work out results in any way? Like some people say it changes recovery time.
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    Dec 29, 2012 3:08 PM GMT
    It's been 12 years for me, but I do recall feeling less fatigued in general since making the switch.
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    Dec 29, 2012 3:22 PM GMT
    FireDoor211 saidI've been slowly adding in some vegan meals through out the day, reading the diets of vegan athletes and incorporating some of their meals into my diet regimen. I'm planning on making a slow transition. So we'll see how it goes. So DO you feel like switching to vegan has changed your work out results in any way? Like some people say it changes recovery time.


    Not much, you can get some good vegan shakes, I assume most people would say that on the assumption that you eat less protein.

    I was vegetarian on and off for about 3 years before becoming vegan, so slow and steady is the way to do it. All about diversity though, if you just eat processed tv dinners and salads your life is going to suck so make sure you get lots of beans and fruit and fresh produce and take a multi-vitamin.

  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Jan 04, 2013 11:26 AM GMT
    JJGreen saidIt's been 12 years for me, but I do recall feeling less fatigued in general since making the switch.


    I've definitely heard this before. Do you mean 12 years as a vegan?
  • FireDoor211

    Posts: 1030

    Jan 04, 2013 11:31 AM GMT
    BroTie said
    FireDoor211 saidI've been slowly adding in some vegan meals through out the day, reading the diets of vegan athletes and incorporating some of their meals into my diet regimen. I'm planning on making a slow transition. So we'll see how it goes. So DO you feel like switching to vegan has changed your work out results in any way? Like some people say it changes recovery time.


    Not much, you can get some good vegan shakes, I assume most people would say that on the assumption that you eat less protein.

    I was vegetarian on and off for about 3 years before becoming vegan, so slow and steady is the way to do it. All about diversity though, if you just eat processed tv dinners and salads your life is going to suck so make sure you get lots of beans and fruit and fresh produce and take a multi-vitamin.



    My diet already consisted of alot of fresh fruit and beans. I'm not sure I've ever eaten a TV dinner. I have been relying so heavily on eggs for breakfast protein, and cheese just because I love cheese. However, I'm lactose intolerant so I really shouldn't be eating it anyway. I take a few vitamins already, they only one I'm concerned about is B12. I can't seem to find one that doesn't make me want to puke. Are you taking anything for B12?
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    Jan 04, 2013 11:42 AM GMT
    As in all things it seems, there are titles for different approaches. You might also investigate on goodle - 'plant-based', 'plant strong', 'Whole Foods plant-based' eating. This thought talks about what you can eat. 'Vegan' does focus on what you can't eat. Your particular goals are important. You'll want to get a handle on your thoughts about oil as well. Enjoy the journey!
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    Jan 04, 2013 12:15 PM GMT
    I have been vegan for sixteen years. As far as transiting goes I would say your approach of slowly moving from vegetarian meals to vegan is the way to go. I went 100% from day one and I think that made things a little more difficult then it needed to be.
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    Jan 04, 2013 12:48 PM GMT
    FireDoor211 said
    JJGreen saidIt's been 12 years for me, but I do recall feeling less fatigued in general since making the switch.


    I've definitely heard this before. Do you mean 12 years as a vegan?


    Yup, 12 year vegan. Vegetarian for 3 years prior to that.
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    Jan 04, 2013 1:05 PM GMT

    In my experience, a vegetarian diet impacts on the quality of thoughts - feel 'lighter' in the mind and a greater sense of clarity, although it is subtle. Miss the meaty flavours though.....
  • Ironman4U

    Posts: 738

    Jan 04, 2013 1:40 PM GMT
    I'm just getting into a more vegetarian and vegan diet. Been doing it about two months now since reading The China Study (which provides compelling scientific research to support the many reasons to eat a whole food plant-based diet).

    I've been cheating with wild caught fish as a protein source (which I realize is neither vegetarian or vegan). So I obviously need tips on expanding my protein sources as well. I'm not a fan of supplements, so I prefer to get my nutrients from food.