Speeding Tickets vs Accident Rates

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 27, 2012 6:39 AM GMT
    I'm too lazy to Google to see if anyone has done this research, but I hypothesize that people with fewer speeding tickets have a higher accident rate.

    Anyone feel like taking me up on the challenge to find the true results?
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    Dec 27, 2012 7:59 AM GMT
    So basically you are delegating work to us. Sounds fun.

    Also holy shit you have been posting on autofire since I last frequented this site. Get ahold of yourself, man.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Dec 27, 2012 1:59 PM GMT
    i would say the opposite sinmce people woth fewer tickets are more inclined to obey traffic rules
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    Dec 27, 2012 2:12 PM GMT
    SkinnyBitch said
    Also holy shit you have been posting on autofire since I last frequented this site. Get ahold of yourself, man.

    What is autofire? A descriptive term, or a program?
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    Dec 27, 2012 2:23 PM GMT
    I've been seeing in a lot of news groups and forums recently on the issue of gun control a lot of people saying something along the lines of, "Cars kill more people the guns, why do the make cars that go so much faster than speed limits." I know they are trying to use that argument as something against gun control, but it got my thinking- why don't they put regulations on how fast a car designed to be driven on streets and highways can go? There are so many other safety requirements of cars, so why not that?
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    May 01, 2013 3:13 AM GMT
    Iceblink saidI've been seeing in a lot of news groups and forums recently on the issue of gun control a lot of people saying something along the lines of, "Cars kill more people the guns, why do the make cars that go so much faster than speed limits." I know they are trying to use that argument as something against gun control, but it got my thinking- why don't they put regulations on how fast a car designed to be driven on streets and highways can go? There are so many other safety requirements of cars, so why not that?


    ... Because the American Male Ego (AME) can't handle not being able to be "faster" / "better" somehow.
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    May 01, 2013 3:20 AM GMT
    I don't typically get speeding tickets in spite of my consistent habit of speeding but I have a very good driving record otherwise. I'm hyperfocused on driving usually (my boss knows i will absolutely NOT answer the phone in the car) plus i've always had small cars so I am very aware of my surroundings since i've had people in Honda Civics not notice me before.

    Actually speeding saved my life one time 3 years ago. I was doing 15 over the limit when a speeding car ran a red light not 2 feet behind my rear bumper. If I'd been doing the speed limit chances are I wouldn't be here to type this post.


    That being said, I am just one person (and a weird one at that). I don't speed because I'm street racing, or drunk, or trying to be an asshole. I just feel this extreme sense of discomfort and nervousness any time there is a car in front of mine so I prefer to "lead the pack" so to say. I think its because I know that if someone starts slowing down 100m ahead I will notice even if their brake lights don't illuminate but I don't trust other drivers to be anywhere near that observant.
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    May 01, 2013 3:26 AM GMT
    Seems safe to assume insurance companies have no choice but to raise rates on people who don't follow the speed limit.

    Faster the vehicle, the more expensive the crash.

    Driving from Seattle to Los Angeles about a month ago, several things became apparent: You can get a speeding ticket from going 60mph on Interstate 5 around Seattle (I have more than one to show for it.) But, cops won't make the effort as long as you are going less than 90 in a 70mph zone in California. Take a record with two tickets into California and your insurance carrier treats you like you're some kind of badass behind the wheel.


    I also observed the typical speed of a reckless driver is the inverse of the safety rating of the vehicle (tested by the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety.) I'm not going to complain as I suspect the organ donor list needs stupid people ASAP and I <3 my POS Volvo..
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    May 01, 2013 3:46 AM GMT
    take it from a reformed speeder ... speeders have more accidents.
  • chadwick1985

    Posts: 391

    May 01, 2013 5:56 AM GMT
    Speaking from a highly trained point of view: the average motorist doesn't have the reflexes, instinct or training to avoid accidents while travelling at higher speeds. Hence the reason people use the term 'Speed kills' also those driving at higher speeds have an increased stopping distance, less time to react and cause more damage when they do get into an accident.


    So from my trained point of view I would say people who speed get into more accidents. Also people who speed are usually distracted while driving more often than people who aren't speeding.
  • He_Man

    Posts: 906

    May 01, 2013 7:19 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidI'm too lazy to Google to see if anyone has done this research, but I hypothesize that people with fewer speeding tickets have a higher accident rate.

    Anyone feel like taking me up on the challenge to find the true results?


    Sorry, Paul, but it looks like your hypothesis is not correct. There is a positive correlation between speeding tickets and higher accidents. The more speeding tickets one incurs, the higher the chance of him/her getting into an accident.

    http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Speeding+Tickets+Indicate+Higher+Crash+Risk+-+Franklin+County


    DID YOU KNOW???

    A public service of the Franklin County Traffic Safety Board and this newspaper

    SPEEDING TICKETS INDICATE HIGHER CRASH RISK

    Have you had a speeding ticket in the last three years? Has your spouse, or perhaps your children? If the answer is yes, take note. A DRIVER’S RISK OF CRASHES INCREASES IN DIRECT PROPORTION TO THE NUMBER OF TIMES THE DRIVER HAS BEEN CITED FOR SPEED VIOLATIONS IN THE PAST. This has been found in Canada and Australia as well as the United States.
    From the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) comes this information. In a study in California, drivers with no speed citations on their records during a three-year period had an average of 135 police-reported crashes per 1000 drivers during the subsequent three years. Among drivers with one speed citation, the average crash rate was almost 50 % higher, and among drivers with two or more speed citations, the crash rate more than doubled compared with drivers with no tickets for speed law violations.
    Using this data, the IIHS developed a statistical model that predicted a 30 % increase in crash likelihood for each additional speed citation after adjusting for driver demographics (age, gender, and licensing status).
    Previous studies have shown that Californians with traffic law violations (all kinds, not just speeding) or crashes on their driving records have a much higher subsequent crash rate than drivers with clean driving records. The IIHS reports similar findings from a British Columbia study of the records of nearly 3.5 million Canadian drivers.
    These statistics are from California and British Columbia, you say, and are not realistic for this area. Perhaps the crash rates may be different, but the likelihood of increased risk of subsequent crashes for drivers with speeding violations would hold true for our area or anywhere for that matter.
    So, if you have received a speeding citation, or had a crash in the past three years, take it as a warning that your driving habits are not as good as they should be, and if you don’t change them soon, your risk of a crash in the near future is significantly higher than drivers with clean records.
    One other thing! If you have been cited for speeding and had it reduced, or even stopped for a speed violation but not ticketed, consider this a warning that you just may NOT be the good driver you think you are.
    Know the law, and please drive safely.