Would u want to be a CELEBRITY or do u prefer ur freedom of anonymity?......

  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Dec 27, 2012 2:39 PM GMT
    How much do u value ur privacy? Do u need the high profile attention & fame that celebrity status & culture provides, do u feel more validated & special if everyone knows ur name? Do u need ur 15 minutes of fame with all the privileges celebs get: endorsements, commercials, higher income, to hobnob & namedrop with the rich & famous, despite the downside of fame: papparazzi, tabloid feeding frenzy & need to know every aspect of ur personal life? Or would prefer to remain anonymous ur whole life & just give back to ur community & charities under the radar, no recognition, applause or ego-boosting necessary, no celebration & adoration of ur uniqueness, vain-free?.......
  • Angelix90

    Posts: 267

    Dec 27, 2012 2:43 PM GMT
    To be honest, I prefer to date a celebrity rather than become one.
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Dec 27, 2012 2:46 PM GMT
    Angelix90 saidTo be honest, I prefer to date a celebrity rather than become one.


    Good answer icon_smile.gif U can still mingle with them at high profile parties.......
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 27, 2012 2:55 PM GMT
    Would not want a celebrity status either. I imagine these people have the hardest time finding privacy and I value my "me time"...a lot!

    If I had $$ like a celebrity, I would definitely give back to the community. My dream charity work would be to help teenagers who have been rejected by their parents for being gay. I would setup college scholarships for them and let them know that their talents are invaluable and that there are people out there who do care about them.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 27, 2012 2:56 PM GMT
    I experienced 15 mins of fame once before, and it doesn't suit me. When I was 23, I published my first novel, and a local gay magazine put my face on the cover, the paper did an article on me, I was interviewed on the news, etc. As a result, people would whisper, he's an author, and gawk at me in public. Also people have expectations of authors. They put them on pedestals, and I'm afraid of heights.

    I still write novels, but I focus all my attention on craft and character expression. I tend to eschew self-promotion. Being an author, you get used to performing in an empty theater, in your underwear--and by the time the audience shows up, you're already on to the next show.
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Dec 27, 2012 2:58 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidI experienced 15 mins of fame once before, and it doesn't suit me. When I was 23, I published my first novel, and a local gay magazine put my face on the cover, the paper did an article on me, I was interviewed on the news, etc. As a result, people would whisper, he's an author, and gawk at me in public. Also people have expectations of authors. They put them on pedestals, and I'm afraid of heights.

    I still write novels, but I focus all my attention on craft and character expression. I tend to eschew self-promotion. Being an author, you get used to performing in an empty theater, in your underwear--and by the time the audience shows up, you're already on to the next show.


    Great analogy icon_smile.gif
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Dec 27, 2012 3:46 PM GMT
    If it's expected in the line of work u do like being an internarionally known artist, than go with the flow, part of the business of selling ur work is to get those with money to buy it.......it's symbiotic.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 27, 2012 3:56 PM GMT
    spgem saidIf it's expected in the line of work u do like being an internarionally known artist, than go with the flow, part of the business of selling ur work is to get those with money to buy it.......


    That means going into a word where mediocrity is praised, and it's all about connections--which is only good for the "artists" who are in it for self serving purposes. The life of a famous artist can be a trap for anyone who isn't fully committed to their vision, because selling becomes a means to an end, rather than creating. The best artists are often overlooked, because they're creating things no one's ever seen, or expected to see. A true visionary must swallow a double edged sword without getting cut.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 27, 2012 3:59 PM GMT
    Not a chance of being a celebrity, however, I wouldn't mind the cash. It would buy me some financial security. It bothers me anyway how society just takes some celebrities opinions and decides these people are the moral messiahs of our generation.

    I guess I'd have to be Greta Garbo, grab the money and run.
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Dec 27, 2012 4:03 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    spgem saidIf it's expected in the line of work u do like being an internarionally known artist, than go with the flow, part of the business of selling ur work is to get those with money to buy it.......


    That means going into a word where mediocrity is praised, and it's all about connections--which is only good for the "artists" who are in it for self serving purposes. The life of a famous artist can be a trap for anyone who isn't fully committed to their vision, because selling becomes a means to an end, rather than creating. The best artists are often overlooked, because they're creating things no one's ever seen, or expected to see. A true visionary must swallow a double edged sword without getting cut.


    So true. Some of the richest successful contemporary artists's works like Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, Takashi Murakami I don't even like. The thing is to create & keep creating what moves & compels u to create & eventually & hopefully society will catch up, sooner than later........ icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 27, 2012 4:04 PM GMT
    I don't know how I'd handle it... but I like be able to fall back into crowds in big cities.
  • Splendidus_1

    Posts: 611

    Dec 27, 2012 4:11 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidI experienced 15 mins of fame once before, and it doesn't suit me. When I was 23, I published my first novel, and a local gay magazine put my face on the cover, the paper did an article on me, I was interviewed on the news, etc. As a result, people would whisper, he's an author, and gawk at me in public. Also people have expectations of authors. They put them on pedestals, and I'm afraid of heights.

    I still write novels, but I focus all my attention on craft and character expression. I tend to eschew self-promotion. Being an author, you get used to performing in an empty theater, in your underwear--and by the time the audience shows up, you're already on to the next show.


    Got me smiling! Which type of novels do you write, btw?

    Some of the most famous and influent writters of all time died poor and unknown. Their work (masterpieces) only came to be ackownledged upon their death. Still, I'd say they didn't want the attention for themselves but rather for their written works instead. It's unfortunate, but somewhat inspiring.
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Dec 27, 2012 4:14 PM GMT
    Splendidus_1 said
    HottJoe saidI experienced 15 mins of fame once before, and it doesn't suit me. When I was 23, I published my first novel, and a local gay magazine put my face on the cover, the paper did an article on me, I was interviewed on the news, etc. As a result, people would whisper, he's an author, and gawk at me in public. Also people have expectations of authors. They put them on pedestals, and I'm afraid of heights.

    I still write novels, but I focus all my attention on craft and character expression. I tend to eschew self-promotion. Being an author, you get used to performing in an empty theater, in your underwear--and by the time the audience shows up, you're already on to the next show.


    Got me smiling! Which type of novels do you write, btw?

    Some of the most famous and influent writters of all time died poor and unknown. Their work (masterpieces) only came to be ackownledged upon their death. Still, I'd say they didn't want the attention for themselves but rather for their written works instead. It's unfortunate, but somewhat inspiring.


    Would be interesting to see a list of those who had posthumous fame acknowledgement & those who had recognition & acclaim while they were alive.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 27, 2012 4:18 PM GMT
    I would like to be a celebrity, I think they can make a difference in this world. Look at Ellen, she has done so much for the community.
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Dec 27, 2012 4:18 PM GMT
    Think deep down we all need acknowledgment for our efforts, to know we're appreciated, that we're doing good & the right thing.......
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Dec 27, 2012 4:19 PM GMT
    whatever3009 saidI would like to be a celebrity, I think they can make a difference in this world. Look at Ellen, she has done so much for the community.


    True with ur status u can do good. Look at Oprah......
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 27, 2012 4:23 PM GMT
    I have been close to some famous people a few years ago. It made me realize that fame is some thing that makes people rotten. It doesn't make you happy at all.
    I ran away those people and this world and now I am very happy with anonimity.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 27, 2012 4:29 PM GMT
    I think becoming a celeb can mess with your craft. When I write songs, the raw emotion comes from my experiences and hardships. Think it would not be the same were I a celeb. So being anonymous sounds good to me!
  • Splendidus_1

    Posts: 611

    Dec 27, 2012 4:32 PM GMT
    spgem said
    Splendidus_1 said
    HottJoe saidI experienced 15 mins of fame once before, and it doesn't suit me. When I was 23, I published my first novel, and a local gay magazine put my face on the cover, the paper did an article on me, I was interviewed on the news, etc. As a result, people would whisper, he's an author, and gawk at me in public. Also people have expectations of authors. They put them on pedestals, and I'm afraid of heights.

    I still write novels, but I focus all my attention on craft and character expression. I tend to eschew self-promotion. Being an author, you get used to performing in an empty theater, in your underwear--and by the time the audience shows up, you're already on to the next show.


    Got me smiling! Which type of novels do you write, btw?

    Some of the most famous and influent writters of all time died poor and unknown. Their work (masterpieces) only came to be ackownledged upon their death. Still, I'd say they didn't want the attention for themselves but rather for their written works instead. It's unfortunate, but somewhat inspiring.


    Would be interesting to see a list of those who had posthumous fame acknowledgement & those who had recognition & acclaim while they were alive.


    Most (important) portuguese poets fit in the former case! I can give you that, haha.
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Dec 27, 2012 4:47 PM GMT
    Like Fernando Pessoa icon_smile.gif
  • Splendidus_1

    Posts: 611

    Dec 27, 2012 4:51 PM GMT
    spgem saidLike Fernando Pessoa icon_smile.gif


    Jackpot icon_wink.gif . National hero today, with his own museum. Life is twisted.
  • TannerMasseur

    Posts: 7893

    Dec 27, 2012 4:53 PM GMT
    Splendidus_1 said
    spgem saidLike Fernando Pessoa icon_smile.gif


    Jackpot icon_wink.gif . National hero today, with his own museum. Life is twisted.


    Like that he came up with solipsism icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 27, 2012 4:59 PM GMT
    Id be a professional athlete who's not a superstar, but good at what they do. Then I'd get paid lots to do something I love and still get noticed by sports media and not so much the tabloid.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 27, 2012 5:37 PM GMT
    For me, anonymity is definitely the way to go. I've made small gifts and donations and I've always asked that my name not be listed. I grew up with well known grandparents and I saw first hand the Hell they went through. They had a boy (my uncle) who was kidnapped for ransom when he was three. They lost him - and I never got to meet him. From then on, the grandparents fought hard to maintain their privacy - wanting their foundation grants made anonymously. My grandfather blamed too much publicity and exposure for the death of his son, so he put a stop to publicity, pictures of parties, social columns mentioning our family, etc.

    I've also seen the other side - - - like a lot of the newly signed athletes in my neighborhood when I lived in Scottsdale. (Hockey, baseball and basketball players). I never saw so much money spent on houses, cars, boats, furniture, flash, clothes, services, help, trips. It was fun seeing them enjoying themselves, and the seemingly endless retinue of help - chefs, trainers, au pairs, designers, hair & makeup people, dog groomers & walkers, personal assistants, pool boys, flower arrangers, gardeners, etc. It was mind boggling seeing all the Hummers and other flashier vehicles parked in the circle driveways. I used to wonder if they'd have any $$ left after their playing days ended.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 27, 2012 5:45 PM GMT
    Splendidus1 Which type of novels do you write, btw?


    My first book, The tragedy of Miss Geneva Flowers, is about a suburban teenager whose dreams of becoming a star are derailed by sex, drugs and drag queens. It's not an autobiography, but rather the most colorful scene I could think to take readers to. I was able to delve into universal themes that anyone could relate with, and, at the time, I felt like I might never need to write another book...

    For my second book, I had two novels to submit. The first one was blown off by my publisher--all 500 pages. The second one, The Boys and the Bees, was published. It's about the secret closeted life of three boys in junior high, which I remembered so vividly, and it's my most controversial work.

    Unfortunately, my publisher went out if business a month after Bees came out, and ... I made a few mistakes, as well, and lost my agent. icon_sad.gif

    Since then, I've been transitioning into becoming a genre writer. My work still has gay main characters, but I'm getting into adult relationships, i.e. sadists, serial killers, aliens..... Lol.

    Villains are easy to write, but it's the heroes and victims that sell the story.