YALE - HARVARD

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    Dec 27, 2012 9:02 PM GMT
    Hi guys,

    I finished both of my masters degrees in September 2011 ( architecture and construction engineering). On the way to be registered before summer. However those diplomas doesn't offer enough job opportunities.
    I did a part of my study in a well internationally ranked Australian university. But have the feeling, studying at Yale or Harvard would be the thing I need to extend my opportunities. I Would like to do a master in Art , as I have a lot of abilities and those are my best tools. Or a MBA related to real-estate, construction,.... Forget to mention that if I can study, I will have a visa, the thing I'm trying to get for ages.
    Not staying in Europe for sure, EU is so dead atm, so it will be US, or back to Australia in 2013.
    Do you guys think that spending so much money on fees is worth it?
    I finished Uni without any debt, but this time if I do that, I would have to borrow a lot of money....

    2013 have to be better than 2012, fingers crossed!icon_biggrin.gif

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    Dec 27, 2012 9:23 PM GMT
    You need to talk to folks who are in the fields you are considering - those who have been thorugh the programs you are considering and folks who do hiring in the industry. Crunch the numbers. ruthlessly.

    I loved Yale as an undergrad and would encourage anyone who can to get there. My degree was worth every penny to me for the doors that it has opened later in life, but then again I was lucky enough to have my parents pay for it. Back in the day it was still pricey but nothing like now.

    Grad school is different, IMO. It's all program by program. I went to a "top 15" state school for law school - being in the top of my class and with an Ivy undergrad, my career opportunities were really just about the same as most of my compatriots who stayed Ivy. And it cost about 100 times less (literally).





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    Dec 27, 2012 10:28 PM GMT
    HFrenchM saidI Would like to do a master in Art



    MFA (Master of Fine Arts) or M.A in Art History? Harvard only has an M.A. in Art History program, no MFA. Yale has both. They are extremely, extremely, extremely competitive programs to get into (I've gone through the process myself with Yale). Unless you have an exceptional Fine Arts portfolio and a commanding exhibition history forget about the Yale MFA.
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    Dec 28, 2012 9:25 AM GMT
    Narciso said
    HFrenchM saidI Would like to do a master in Art



    MFA (Master of Fine Arts) or M.A in Art History? Harvard only has an M.A. in Art History program, no MFA. Yale has both. They are extremely, extremely, extremely competitive programs to get into (I've gone through the process myself with Yale). Unless you have an exceptional Fine Arts portfolio and a commanding exhibition history forget about the Yale MFA.


    Actually i'm doing exhibitions around France, Luxembourg and germany for years.
    Also teach drawing for frst and second year art/architecture bachelor degree.
    However it as always been an extra work, as my main activity remain architecture. But I want to drop this part for a while and try my best in Art.I think I have more chance to achieve great things is this field.

    Just wondering if spending this amount of money is worth it.
    It will probably for next year anyway, enrollment due date s 2nd January, and have to proof about 60 000 $ income.
  • jock5827

    Posts: 52

    Dec 28, 2012 10:58 PM GMT
    You should investigate fellowship opportunities. There might be educational grants available from specific universities, from the French government, from Brussels for EU citizens, or from international organizations like the IIE (http://www.iie.org/). If you can get any help with paying for graduate school, take it.

    Also, if you are thinking of going to America to study, expand your map beyond New England. There are a lot of great programs at schools that might not be as internationally well-known as Harvard and Yale, but carry a lot of weight with employers. This includes top-tier private schools like Duke, Northwestern, and Rice, and "public" Ivies like the University of North Carolina and the University of California (Berkeley, UCLA, etc.). You can also look north of the border at schools in Canada. Admission to any program is an honor, but it's always good to have some options available in case H or Y doesn't work out.

    Finally, if both programs will take two years to finish (give or take), I would recommend the M.B.A. over an M.A. The job market is tough for graduate students generally, but with an MBA you could have more flexibility getting a job in the private sector or doing something more academic or government-related. Good luck!
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    Dec 29, 2012 8:59 AM GMT
    Well... Let us see some of your art work

    tumblr_m8gefyYXe91qal6ns.jpg
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    Dec 29, 2012 9:55 AM GMT
    _SAGE_ saidWell... Let us see some of your art work

    tumblr_m8gefyYXe91qal6ns.jpg


    Uploading some more on my profile right now.
    Used to paint and draw very figurative thing in the past, at least till university. Then tend to slightly change my way. Less colors, less photorealistic... On the way to do an other exhibition in a few months, with some totaly abstract panting.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 29, 2012 9:56 AM GMT
    jock5827 saidYou should investigate fellowship opportunities. There might be educational grants available from specific universities, from the French government, from Brussels for EU citizens, or from international organizations like the IIE (http://www.iie.org/). If you can get any help with paying for graduate school, take it.

    Also, if you are thinking of going to America to study, expand your map beyond New England. There are a lot of great programs at schools that might not be as internationally well-known as Harvard and Yale, but carry a lot of weight with employers. This includes top-tier private schools like Duke, Northwestern, and Rice, and "public" Ivies like the University of North Carolina and the University of California (Berkeley, UCLA, etc.). You can also look north of the border at schools in Canada. Admission to any program is an honor, but it's always good to have some options available in case H or Y doesn't work out.

    Finally, if both programs will take two years to finish (give or take), I would recommend the M.B.A. over an M.A. The job market is tough for graduate students generally, but with an MBA you could have more flexibility getting a job in the private sector or doing something more academic or government-related. Good luck!


    Thanks for those advices, I will check things out!