Questions about getting help.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2013 2:18 AM GMT
    Has anyone gone through their company's EAP (Employee Assistance Program) to get help? If so, what have your experience been like? I want to get help with my depression and other issues but im afraid that they would tell me that being gay is just a phase and all that yada yada bullcrap.
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    Jan 06, 2013 11:54 PM GMT
    Yeah. When/if they tell you being gay is a phase, sue them for malpractice.

    You'll win. icon_wink.gif
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    Jan 07, 2013 12:37 AM GMT
    If you are military or government employee I would seek treatment outside of any company program. It can impact your security clearance process.

    Otherwise read the fine print. If a counselor says you are choosing to be gay or depressed then walk out and find a different one.
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    Jan 07, 2013 12:38 AM GMT
    I've used EAP, but never mentioned being gay. They were very helpful, and they garantee your privacy. To my knowlege, any therapist with an adult client cannot repeat anything without your written permission. Apart from discussing plans for murder, of course, you should be quite safe talking about gay issues. icon_smile.gif
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    Jan 07, 2013 10:25 PM GMT
    Alright. Thank you guys for the advice and information. I feel a little bit better about it. Going to call them tomorrow.
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    Jan 07, 2013 10:36 PM GMT
    I think it depends on the company. If it's an outside counselor who doesn't answer to the company, it looks better. At the large government contractor where I worked, those programs were there for the benefit of the company, not the employees. They were there to 1. document that nothing is the fault of the company and 2. start the process of easing you out the door. (Which, by the way, is not always a bad thing.)