Cool Air Humidifier

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    Jan 08, 2013 1:21 AM GMT
    I recently decided to buy the air humidifier. The information that I research indicates that it actually helps with dry skin sleep, and the mucus membranes so I got it for this winter. I would like to know if anyone use this consistently? I know that dry skin increases your chances of infection due to bacterias invading and cracks areas on your skin no matter how small it is. You are susceptible to diseases.

    Also if you do use it consistently do you feel like you sleep better and feel more moisture within your skin? I usually use lotion around 3-4 times a week to have a healthy moisturize feeling on my body. The last time I used one was like 10 years ago so I decided to make a healthy habit of using these more often to receive adequate moisture. It will be very enlightened for me too see some of your experiences.
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    Jan 08, 2013 1:24 AM GMT
    Cool air humidifiers are extremely loud.

    Look into how much of an area you want to humidify - your whole living space or just your bedroom at night. Then you can research which type and size of humidifier you need.
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    Jan 08, 2013 1:29 AM GMT
    DudeInNOVA saidCool air humidifiers are extremely loud.

    Look into how much of an area you want to humidify - your whole living space or just your bedroom at night. Then you can research which type and size of humidifier you need.


    I got one it wasn't that loud it is a small one that last for 24 hours. It is only for the bed room. I am only using 8-12 hours a day.

    Are you currently using one?
  • LJay

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    Jan 08, 2013 1:33 AM GMT
    Mine is made by Vornado and is really quiet. I had bought one from Sears and ended up taking it back because of the noice. The Vornado one is a great help and much softer than a window AC on low setting.

    Yes. It helps. So does drinking LOTS of water.

    I started having skin problems a couple of years ago and found out from the doctors that warm, rather than hot, baths/showers are better. I also have learned to use Dove unscented soap and Aveeno Daily Moisturizing lotion (cheap at Costco.)

    Since I am not working or going out every day, I am able to skip bathing every other day. That helps, too.
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    Jan 08, 2013 1:33 AM GMT
    Perserverance saidI got one it wasn't that loud it is a small one that last for 24 hours. It is only for the bed room. I am only using 8-12 hours a day.

    Are you currently using one?

    Maybe they've gotten quieter. I had one about 5 years ago that was very noisy. The steam ones hardly make any noise. I had to have my entire heating and A/C system replaced a few years ago, and I had them install a humidifier on that.
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    Jan 08, 2013 1:37 AM GMT
    When it gets too dry, I put a pot of water on the wood stove. It looks like this: steam comes out her nostrils. I have to admit that I haven't actually measured the humidity with and without it, to see if it's doing any good. But it looks cool.

    121302297-260x260-0-0_minuteman+dragon+w
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    Jan 08, 2013 2:00 AM GMT
    Two weeks ago I bought a Crane nebulizer cool air humidifier because my African Grey's feathers were unusually drier than normal, and I had a dry throat every morning. I moisturize my skin everyday regardless of the season.

    I've noticed a definite difference in her feathers, and I don't have a dry throat in the morning. It is exceptionally quiet (~45dB C-weighted). It's only used in the bedroom.

    However, It's one more thing for me to clean every week.
  • LJay

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    Jan 08, 2013 2:01 AM GMT
    I like the dragon! Can you make baked beans in it too?

    Perserverance, use the thing all the time. Humidity spreads, so you can't keep it in one room anyway. Mine holds four gallons and will easily go through it in a dry day. I thought that might be too much and my ENT doc, said it was really not much at all.

    If you have radiators, you can put pans of water on those. Well-watered green plants help too, though you will need to mist them to keep them happy.
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    Jan 08, 2013 2:23 AM GMT
    Interestingly (or maybe not) I have some old thermohygrographs that I used to use in the greenhouses. What makes them work is a little bundle of human hairs that get longer and shorter according to the humidity. icon_cool.gif Back in my ponytail days, I used to just cut off a few of my own. Don't know what I'd use to get them working now.
    ThermoHygrograph.JPG
  • LJay

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    Jan 08, 2013 2:28 AM GMT
    Well, you could befriend the neighbor's puppy.
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    Jan 08, 2013 3:12 AM GMT
    From your original post, I get the impression that as long as you feel it's working, it's working and so I'm glad you're happy.

    I have a hot air humidifier. I have so much air that it can't really keep up with the dryness. Changing the water twice a day is a major pain, and the minerals accumulate on the heating element rapidly. I use it to reduce static shocks mainly, and being less dry is a possible perk.

    I'm not sure if the same problems would happen with cold humidifiers in terms of minerals left behind.
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    Jan 08, 2013 3:53 AM GMT
    For allergies I would recommend you to change your AC filter twice every month in the summer and once a month in the winter. Don't buy the cheapest filters, the cotton looking ones are the recommended. If you want to take it a step further, contact a local AC company ask them to install a inline filter in your furnace. Those are usually almost last a whole year before they are due for a change. The install should cost $300-400. They work great if you have allergies! Also, for the humidity your ac should control it, but you need to have a humidity control thermostat. $80 if not less. Set it to 50-60% humidity. That percentage is usually where the body fills comfortable. Funny in Houston we have the opposite, we have dehumidifiers. Me I have a nice touchscreen thermostat that controls my humidity. I know some in the ac field, because for many summers and a little after high school I worked for my uncle's HVAC company.