Spondlyosis, physical therapy and working out

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    Jan 08, 2013 2:24 AM GMT
    So I was diagnosed with cervical spondlyosis last Friday and start physical therapy this week. I'm trying to limit the use of pain meds and hopefully the physical therapist can show me some techniques to deal with it through exercises and stretching.

    Curious what anyone else's experience with this issue and physical therapy has been like so I'll have a better idea of what to expect. Also, if you were lifting weights, did you modify your workouts?

    Feel free to pm me rather than post in the forum if you prefer.
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    Jan 08, 2013 6:39 AM GMT
    According to my family history, I was supposed to already be disabled by the mid 30's from cervical spondlyosis. All the docs I've talked to have told me that being active is the only thing that's delayed the inevitable.

    So far all the xrays I've had have shown a healthy spine, but I can feel it's not perfect. This is why I keep getting more and more involved in physical activities (besides the fact that it's fun).

    I can't give you advice on your current condition, but I can say keep your workouts and activities safe. If you're doing something that aggravates it, slack off some. And beware of things that could cause future damage even if it's not immediately apparent (already been through a serious disk herniation).
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    Jan 08, 2013 11:32 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidAccording to my family history, I was supposed to already be disabled by the mid 30's from cervical spondlyosis. All the docs I've talked to have told me that being active is the only thing that's delayed the inevitable.

    So far all the xrays I've had have shown a healthy spine, but I can feel it's not perfect. This is why I keep getting more and more involved in physical activities (besides the fact that it's fun).

    I can't give you advice on your current condition, but I can say keep your workouts and activities safe. If you're doing something that aggravates it, slack off some. And beware of things that could cause future damage even if it's not immediately apparent (already been through a serious disk herniation).


    Thanks. I plan to tell the physical therapist I want to be as aggressive as possible - while staying safe of couse. My instincts tell me that being sedentary will ony cause faser deterioration.

    Do you know of anything in partiular that caused your disk herniation?
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    Jan 08, 2013 6:08 PM GMT
    Sashaman said
    paulflexes saidAccording to my family history, I was supposed to already be disabled by the mid 30's from cervical spondlyosis. All the docs I've talked to have told me that being active is the only thing that's delayed the inevitable.

    So far all the xrays I've had have shown a healthy spine, but I can feel it's not perfect. This is why I keep getting more and more involved in physical activities (besides the fact that it's fun).

    I can't give you advice on your current condition, but I can say keep your workouts and activities safe. If you're doing something that aggravates it, slack off some. And beware of things that could cause future damage even if it's not immediately apparent (already been through a serious disk herniation).


    Thanks. I plan to tell the physical therapist I want to be as aggressive as possible - while staying safe of couse. My instincts tell me that being sedentary will ony cause faser deterioration.

    Do you know of anything in partiular that caused your disk herniation?


    On xrays my spine looks great; nice healthy bones...until you get to the lower lumbar, and those 5 verts look like ancient wind worn and scoured pillars from some old desert ruins. Oh well, it is what it is. Years of lots of exercise kept it at bay. I have good days and bad ones. No pain meds, I'd rather know what's hurting as a signal to stop whatever I'm doing and do something else.
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    Jan 08, 2013 6:12 PM GMT
    I agree. I took the pain meds for a few days last week when the pain was really bad but don't want to take them unless I absolutely have to. I'd rather have a good idea of how my body feels so I can know what might be a trigger.
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    Jan 28, 2013 5:15 AM GMT
    what i learned to do in physical therapy has kept my sciatica in check for the last several years, degenerative disks L2-3 and L5 showed up on MRI about 5 years ago, when a sciatica attack seems to be imminent, (if you never had one, ouch, is a understatement, :lolicon_smile.gif i hit the floor and go through series of physical therapy exercises for like a few days and it keeps in check, i havent used major pain killers in a few years, occasionally Advil, or if soreness persists, i'll ask doctor for muscle relaxer. Your physical therapy will do wonders for ya!, wish you luck
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    Jan 28, 2013 6:07 PM GMT
    Thanks. I learned some new stretches and exercises from the physical therapist and have been slowly and carefully getting back to my gym workouts. No pain at all for a little over a week. icon_cool.gif