Anyone have a Tonsilectomy as an adult?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 08, 2013 2:17 PM GMT
    My tonsils have been infected 5 times since the start of 2012, I'm sitting at home enduring another bout of Tonsilitis and antibiotics.

    I've been referred to a surgeon to have them removed - but have heard a lot of negatives about the operation taking many weeks to recover from (around 6 weeks) before commencing exercise again, for example.

    Anyone have them removed as an adult who can fill me in?
  • stratavos

    Posts: 1831

    Jan 08, 2013 4:00 PM GMT
    I'll be having mine removed once I've recovered from mono and as far as the government is concerned (and theaters, and anything involving tickets) I'm an adult. I'll let you know after. (month 6 of infection >.<; )
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    Jan 08, 2013 4:01 PM GMT
    Yeah. In '96. I wish I could say it were easy peasy. It was about four weeks for me. Swallowing any food beyond oatmeal was painful. It'll be soup and protein shakes for a while. Talking and laughing was hard too.
  • stratavos

    Posts: 1831

    Jan 08, 2013 4:04 PM GMT
    n8698u saidYeah. In '96. I wish I could say it were easy peasy. It was about four weeks for me. Swallowing any food beyond oatmeal was painful. It'll be soup and protein shakes for a while. Talking and laughing was hard too.


    don't forget that yogurt and ice cream are also options as well as soup ;)
  • Sportsfan1

    Posts: 479

    Jan 08, 2013 4:22 PM GMT
    I had my tonsils removed as an adult and it was very painful for about a couple of weeks. Lots of liquids and soft foods like oatmeal, soups and of course ice cream. Protein shakes are a good substitute. It was very uncomfortable for about three weeks. I must say that it was one of the best things I have ever done. I no longer get as many colds as I used to, no more sore throats and no more nasal infections. I was able to exercise after about three weeks.
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    Jan 08, 2013 8:32 PM GMT

    I had my tonsils removed when I was in my mid thirties.

    The bad news is it was more a painful recovery than I expected. In the hospital I had to ask for stronger pain meds a few times. Then I was pretty uncomfortable at home for about a week. One of my big disappointments which was that ice cream, which I love, didn't provide much relief. Chocolate and fruit flavors seemed too acidic and my throat was sensitive to cold as well.

    The good news is that I have been a lot healthier since getting rid of my tonsils. I had been prone to frequent sore throats and bouts of just not feeling great. All of that has been history.

    So, on balance, my only regret was not having my tonsils removed sooner.

    Good luck with the surgery and the recovery.
  • TheAlchemixt

    Posts: 2294

    Jan 08, 2013 9:24 PM GMT
    Hmm... I thought they stopped doing these.
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    Jan 08, 2013 9:48 PM GMT
    Yup.
    I was 31.
    I had been getting a sore throat about every two months for 5 years.
    I saw three different Ear, Nose & Throat specialists (ENT) None of them wanted to entertain the idea of removing the tonsils of a 31 year old. But, I knew my body.

    I finally went to see a specialist, and I talked with him before opening my mouth.

    I told him the spray didn't work, and that I was tired of feeling the way I did, and told him that I really needed his help. Once he took a look at my throat, it took him about 2 seconds to say "ok, those have to come out" and scheduled me for surgery about 5 weeks later.

    It was THE BEST thing I ever did. That was 10 years ago, and I think I have had two sore throats since then.

    Benefits: I get sick less often, I feel better, I breathe better, and I miss less work.

    Drawbacks: ALL short term. I could not eat for 9 days. Not even ice cream. It was too syropy & lingered in my throat, which made me want to cough. (not good.)

    I'll tell you more of the drawbacks if you want, but none of them last more than a month, and I am so happy i did it.

    good luck!


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    Jan 10, 2013 1:02 PM GMT
    I've just been chatting with a fellow Aussie who says the hospitals recommended regimen usually includes a lot of dry toast, to abrade the scabbing and to keep the site clean.

    Sounds pretty painful but I have the sick leave and the insurance to do it, I think I will book some leave once the cooler weather starts if I can get into hospital for it.
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    Jan 10, 2013 5:44 PM GMT
    sc69 saidI've just been chatting with a fellow Aussie who says the hospitals recommended regimen usually includes a lot of dry toast, to abrade the scabbing and to keep the site clean.

    Sounds pretty painful but I have the sick leave and the insurance to do it, I think I will book some leave once the cooler weather starts if I can get into hospital for it.


    I'm a nurse and I've never heard of using this while in recovery. If anything, we tell patients to stay away from ALL types of solid food until the follow up appointment with the surgeon. How does dry toast, which is not sterile, keep a surgical site in the mouth clean? Your mouth's saliva, which are loaded with enzymes to kill bacteria, does the job for you.

    If you decide to eat solid foods during your recovery, you run the risk of rebleeding. But hey, you do what you need to do. It's your recovery and your health. Good luck!
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    Jan 10, 2013 5:51 PM GMT
    sc69 saidMy tonsils have been infected 5 times since the start of 2012, I'm sitting at home enduring another bout of Tonsilitis and antibiotics.

    I've been referred to a surgeon to have them removed - but have heard a lot of negatives about the operation taking many weeks to recover from (around 6 weeks) before commencing exercise again, for example.

    Anyone have them removed as an adult who can fill me in?


    For me the surgery was pretty quick and painless. The recovery blew, but I don't think it took any more than four weeks. You'll have to avoid dairy products and acidic foods, but you'd be surprised how much you'll come to love water. There are some incredibly unpleasant recovery periods that I won't describe (your body WILL gross you out, and not much grosses me out personally), but you'll get over them. In the end it was completely worth it. Make sure you've got somebody to chill with you for a few hours a day at least for the first couple weeks. You'll be fine and in the long run you'll forget the details (I did).