BILLY POLSON..What to do for extreme soreness?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 23, 2008 2:36 AM GMT
    I knew i would be in trouble with the cardio stuff at the realjock bootcamp,
    but i have never been this sore,,front upper thigh ....its not the usual butt soreness from a good leg workout. Its been two days and i am having a hell of time walking .LOL What is the best way to deal with extreme soreness?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 23, 2008 4:13 AM GMT
    Well, I'm not Billy, but I can offer a few tips.

    Ice, ice, ice. Especially within the first 24 hours.

    Heat after the first 24 hours.

    Ibuprofen.

    After a five minute warm up, do some stretching.

    Now, I completely disclaim the following advice, but it works for me when my shoulder goes wanky. Take two Aleve tablets in the morning and two at night for 3-4 days. This is a higher than recommended dosage, so don't do this if you have any of the typical aspirin/NSAID reactions or any contraindications for aspirin. Probably better to ask a doctor before doing this, but I tell ya, it works.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 23, 2008 4:27 AM GMT
    A real nice hot long bath is underrated, helped me a lot after my 180 squats/lunges day icon_smile.gif plus a magnesium sport drink.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 23, 2008 5:46 AM GMT
    You should come to SF and indulge yourself this Sunday.



    folsom5s.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 23, 2008 5:56 AM GMT
    Something I learned from a few circus performers/gymnasts I've been stretching with is to soak in hot water with some epsom salt for 10-15 mins. It helps to relieve muscle soreness.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 23, 2008 6:38 AM GMT
    i 've got some epsom salts. I'l try that.
    The muscle liniment didn't do anything.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 23, 2008 7:09 AM GMT
    Ice. Ice really helps I think.
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Sep 23, 2008 9:24 AM GMT
    Soreness is caused by little micro-tears in the muscle fibers
    these tears leak out materials that are toxic and cause inflammation
    what you want to do is flush out these toxins

    Warm water baths...
    anti-inflammatories ie: Motrin Naprosyn
    Massage the area
    and Light exercise
  • sf_athlete

    Posts: 15

    Sep 23, 2008 4:40 PM GMT
    Hey guys-
    Sorry I just saw this link.

    GQJock below gave great info and explaination.

    My specific recommendation for calves would be to use a foam roller to slowly roll out some of the tight areas and try to get the damaged fibers to line back up and start moving again. Then doing non-impact movements where you use your calves in a full range of motion will slowly help them get back to normal.

    See the article on foam rolling for form advice on rolling your calves.
    http://www.realjock.com/article/1218/

    Good luck and NICE job at the boot camp mister!
    Billy
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 23, 2008 5:15 PM GMT
    sf_athlete saidHey guys-
    Sorry I just saw this link.

    GQJock below gave great info and explaination.

    My specific recommendation for calves would be to use a foam roller to slowly roll out some of the tight areas and try to get the damaged fibers to line back up and start moving again. Then doing non-impact movements where you use your calves in a full range of motion will slowly help them get back to normal.

    See the article on foam rolling for form advice on rolling your calves.
    http://www.realjock.com/article/1218/

    Good luck and NICE job at the boot camp mister!
    Billy


    I can attest to the foam roller advice. Back in my running/marathon days, I would use the foam roller to work the kinks out of my glutes, IT bands, hamstrings and calves. However, I still had to supplement with ice, ibuprofen, epsom salt baths (after 24 hours), etc. -- especially after long runs or sprints. Although none of these remedies will provide immediate relief, they can speed up the recovery period by a few days.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 24, 2008 1:07 AM GMT
    i actually talked about the rollers with a guy at the boot camp but didn't think if applied to injury. The hot epsom salts did the trick tho..No soreness at all this morning after an hour or so soak. Now , what to do to keep it from happening again.

    My specific recommendation for calves would be to use a foam roller to slowly roll out some of the tight areas and try to get the damaged fibers to line back up and start moving again. Then doing non-impact movements where you use your calves in a full range of motion will slowly help them get back to normal.

    See the article on foam rolling for form advice on rolling your calves.
    http://www.realjock.com/article/1218/

    Good luck and NICE job at the boot camp mister!
    Billy[/quote]
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 26, 2008 2:44 PM GMT
    Alpha13 saidi actually talked about the rollers with a guy at the boot camp but didn't think if applied to injury. The hot epsom salts did the trick tho..No soreness at all this morning after an hour or so soak. Now , what to do to keep it from happening again.


    Alpha, I'm glad the hot epsom salt baths worked. I use them all the time after really hard workouts or stretching sessions.

    Ruckus had some good suggestions on how to prevent extreme soreness from happening again. You need to stop the inflammation after the workout using either ice or anti-inflammatory meds. I personally prefer to use ice instead of the meds. After long runs, my marathon-running friends used to walk to the ocean and soak their legs in the cold water. They said it was uncomfortable at first, but they noticed a difference in recovery time.