Decline Bench Press

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 28, 2007 3:32 AM GMT
    I've always wondered if there's any major benefit to be gained by doing decline presses.

    Just wondering what everyone here thinks?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 28, 2007 5:56 AM GMT
    I think decline bench is an advanced exercise to do after you have built up your chest, and are looking for better definition. Your own genetic muscle symmetry will have a lot to do with how well it works for you. It totally helped define my "chesticles"..lol, imho.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 28, 2007 7:06 AM GMT
    There's some research around to suggest that decline presses target the lower section of your pectorals, whilst flat bench targets the middle and incline targets the upper. Whilst this is true to some extent, like any muscle group, its more important to balance your exercises - you cannot spot train a section of your pectorals.

    In my experience, having a whole heap of different exercises to attack a muscle group with will keep your muscles from growing accustomed to the range of movement and weight lifted and will see better results.

    So, in essence, decline presses should be part of your overall chest exercise regime, but not the main focus.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 28, 2007 7:24 AM GMT
    Decline presses can be a good alternative to dips, which work the lower pecs well but can also have a relatively high risk for shoulder injury. They don't need to be a staple of every workout program, but I incorporate them every few cycles to stress the chest differently.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 29, 2007 11:04 AM GMT
    Decline presses, when done properly (and with a spotter or saftey straps), have been shown in studies to activate more chest muscle fiber than flat or incline presses. This statement holds true for both barbell and dumbbell variations.

    If I can find the citations, I'll post a ranking of BB vs DB, Incline, Flat, Decline.

    Joey
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 31, 2007 5:05 PM GMT
    I agree with what folks have said in that you need to do a variety of chest exercises. I worked with a trainer for about 1 1/2 years and we never did the same workout twice in a row. He had me do all sorts of super-sets and one I like is combining the decline dumbbell press with decline push ups.

    I do four sets of the dumbbell decline press with 10 reps, starting with lighter weights and increasing by 10 lbs. each time. In between each set of the dumbbell press I do a set of decline push ups, starting with 10 reps and ending with 15.

    I now include some form of push up (as a super-set) with all of my chest workouts and have seen a difference in strength and definition. I hated clap push ups at first but now love them.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 01, 2007 12:59 AM GMT
    I have the same kinda story as Lissenup. I work w/a trainer and we never do the same workout. I do however hate decline. My face gets all red and it's really uncomfortable so we use other exercises in
    place of them now.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 01, 2007 1:23 AM GMT
    This thing of doing a different workout every time is something I'd never do to my clients.

    It takes about 10-14 days for your brain to figure out which fiber bundles to fire when you do an exercise. That's called "neuro-physiological adaptation". If you constantly switch exercises, you prevent this from happening.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 01, 2007 2:15 AM GMT
    I been trying all kinds of things to improve my pecs....upper outer....ends up that plain old push ups are working out the best. I end up cheating with inclines, declines etc,my arms and shoulders end up doing the work . The push ups are kinda wide and my handsare a bit more forward than normal but I vary that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 01, 2007 2:23 AM GMT
    The feedback that I am getting is that decline has been working for me and helping me to develop what voxyn so cleverly calls "chesticles." ;) I find incline bench to taxing that decline feels downright comfy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 01, 2007 4:02 AM GMT
    As someone else mentioned, the decline would tend to focus more on the lower part of the pecs--that part I call the "shelf" that really tends to add more definition than others. I tend to find that I can press the most weight on the flat bench, the next most with the decline, and the least on the incline, which stresses the shoulders more than the others.
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Sep 01, 2007 12:16 PM GMT
    As everyone seems to have stated declines are mainly used for the lower pecs
    the good thing about them is that they take some pressure off the shoulders and are good if you're prone to injury or if you wanna rest the shoulders for a time for any reason