DIN's Job Hunt Check List

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 6:01 AM GMT
    For those of you who don't already know, I need to find a new job. I haven't had to interview for a job in many years. I am organizing my thoughts and preparing myself for the process. Any advice would be appreciated.

    1. Resume - My resume needs to be updated, but it should be in fairly good shape. If anyone has some links to resume sites, that would be great. I have 20 years of experience, so my trouble is usually trimming it down into something readable without losing the important information.

    2. Suits - I don't own a single suit. I've lost about 100 lbs in the past several years, so none of my old clothes fit me anyway. Where can I go to get a reasonably priced suit? I don't need anything too fancy. I don't think anyone expect software programmers to dress that well anyway. Ha ha!

    3. Job Listings - I will need to post my resume everywhere. If anyone has done this recently and hasn't any tips, I'd love to hear them.

    Thanks everyone! Wish me luck!

    FYI - I'm still employed by my current company, but I'm not sure they're going to be able to find a new contract for me. I'd like to find something new anyway.
  • TheBizMan

    Posts: 4091

    Jan 11, 2013 6:11 AM GMT
    For preparing for your interview, I'd suggest glassdoor.com. You can search companies and look at people's interview experience. Often times they directly post what types of questions they were asked.
  • kevmoran

    Posts: 1543

    Jan 11, 2013 6:14 AM GMT
    Kneepads. You don't wanna get sore after all those "job interviews".
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 6:15 AM GMT
    kevmoran saidKneepads. You don't wanna get sore after all those "job interviews".

    It only took 2 posts for the sex jokes to start. How predictable. icon_razz.gif
  • kevmoran

    Posts: 1543

    Jan 11, 2013 6:16 AM GMT
    DudeInNOVA said
    kevmoran saidKneepads. You don't wanna get sore after all those "job interviews".

    It only took 2 posts for the sex jokes to start. How predictable. icon_razz.gif

    Didn't want to leave you disappointed.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 6:20 AM GMT
    For suits, try S&K. When I shop there for suits, I always manage to find one of high quality for less than $100. Good luck with your career pursuit!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 6:20 AM GMT
    kevmoran saidDidn't want to leave you disappointed.

    Thank you. Your kindness is appreciated.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 6:26 AM GMT
    1) Not sure what type of job you're applying to. But you need to decide if you want a chronological resume or functional resume. If you're not sure how to format it, check the Microsoft Office site. Surprisingly, they have some pretty good resume templates for Word.

    2) Target, Sears, JCP, Marshall's, Norstrom Rack, Banana Republic. You can pick up different pieces from each. I mean, they won't care/notice that you're wearing a $15 collared shirt from Sears when you're wearing a jacket/blazer that covers it up. So cut corners where it's not obvious. Spend a little extra money on the jacket, pants, and tie.

    3) Browse LinkedIn. Companies post their jobs there. Some will ask you to apply through LinkedIn. But I find that most of them redirect you to the main company website. I've gotten a few leads and interviews through LinkedIn, both directly and indirectly. Also, check Facebook. Some companies announce job listings on the FB page. Also, check Craigslist. I actually found my current job through there. Also, don't just upload your resume to job sites and expect to get phone calls. It never happens. Find the job you want. Tweak your resume so that it's in line with the job description. Apply.
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Jan 11, 2013 6:32 AM GMT
    Always be positive and sound ambitious in your interviews, but keep in your mind 'eh, if they hire me, good, if the don't, oh well' (it'll help you from being nervous and you have to realize that you are competing against a lot of other people so your chance of being hired are always slim, so it is better to be relaxed - not desperate) Definitely search on all the interview questions you can find and be prepared for answers to all of them. Write them down and study them daily, because the easier you can make the answer flow out of your mouth the better you will sound. They always ask something negative, so be prepared to put a spin on it, such as what did you dislike about your last job or boss. You gotta spin it and make it sound positive. Make sure to ask when you are asked if you have any questions, ask about salary, overtime, hours, vacation accumulation, and the type of people that work for the company, like are they old timers, newbies, education experience. These are good to ask, because it shows you are interested in working there. They always send those stupid 'we regret to inform you letters', but if they call, be sure to ask what kept you from being hired so you know if you need to improve on anything. Just keep going over those interview questions over and over and memorize them and answer them out loud to yourself as if you were talking to someone in the interview. It will be your best practice. The better you are in the interview the shorter your search. Oh and as for suits, just go down to the goodwill or the Arc, one good one will be enough, nothing to fancy. Over dressing can kill an interview too. It really depends on the field your looking. In my field, (technical) I would just wear a sports jacket and nice slacks. Basically, you are dressing to the position. In the interview, do not ramble, keep you answers short, and even if their is an awkward silence, as if they are waiting for you to say more, don't. It's their move, let them ask the questions. Good Luck.
  • kevmoran

    Posts: 1543

    Jan 11, 2013 6:32 AM GMT
    Also for real suggestions, go Zara for suits if you want to look young and on point without spending a fortune or getting cheap thin fabric. And if you don't wear dress shoes often, I go for H&M, their dress shoes are $25 and look expensive. They won't last long but if they're used sparingly it shouldn't matter.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 7:05 PM GMT
    Great tips guys. Thanks!
  • RaggedyMan

    Posts: 7185

    Jan 11, 2013 7:06 PM GMT
    Show some skin and talk with your eyes.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Jan 11, 2013 7:08 PM GMT
    Penney's has been the standard place for business suits for a long time. Reasonable and well made.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 7:10 PM GMT
    DudeInNOVA saidFor those of you who don't already know, I need to find a new job. I haven't had to interview for a job in many years. I am organizing my thoughts and preparing myself for the process. Any advice would be appreciated.

    1. Resume - My resume needs to be updated, but it should be in fairly good shape. If anyone has some links to resume sites, that would be great. I have 20 years of experience, so my trouble is usually trimming it down into something readable without losing the important information.

    2. Suits - I don't own a single suit. I've lost about 100 lbs in the past several years, so none of my old clothes fit me anyway. Where can I go to get a reasonably priced suit? I don't need anything too fancy. I don't think anyone expect software programmers to dress that well anyway. Ha ha!

    3. Job Listings - I will need to post my resume everywhere. If anyone has done this recently and hasn't any tips, I'd love to hear them.

    Thanks everyone! Wish me luck!

    FYI - I'm still employed by my current company, but I'm not sure they're going to be able to find a new contract for me. I'd like to find something new anyway.


    Would you like my resume? It's professionally done...by me of course!

    What is reasonable for you in terms of price?

    I have a bunch of sites you can use to post your resume.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 7:11 PM GMT
    sanjose408 saidShow some skin and talk with your eyes.

    That's for my night job.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 7:12 PM GMT
    blasiankid saidWould you like my resume? It's professionally done...by me of course!

    I have to find you a job too?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 7:21 PM GMT
    DudeInNOVA said
    blasiankid saidWould you like my resume? It's professionally done...by me of course!

    I have to find you a job too?


    I have a job but thanks! It's for you to use as a model. If you don't need/want it let me know.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 7:21 PM GMT
    I found it necessary to make up about four different CV's. Different styles targeted to different markets. Although I ended up going the "independent consultant" route, I still have multiple versions of these (Facilities and Qualifications Documents.) Different customers are interested in different things.

    Looking back over the last thirty years, it would have really helped to have some training and experience in basic prostitution.
  • in_this_corne...

    Posts: 704

    Jan 11, 2013 7:27 PM GMT
    What language do you program in?
  • kevmoran

    Posts: 1543

    Jan 11, 2013 7:27 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidI found it necessary to make up about four different CV's. Different styles targeted to different markets. Although I ended up going the "independent consultant" route, I still have multiple versions of these (Facilities and Qualifications Documents.) Different customers are interested in different things.

    Looking back over the last thirty years, it would have really helped to have some training and experience in basic prostitution.

    Actually this too if you have different types of jobs you're applying for. I have three different resumes in different styles because I'm looking at different subset of an industry. Sometimes I can get away with my pretty graphic design-y resume, sometimes Times New Roman in paragraphs is what I need.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 7:28 PM GMT
    blasiankid saidI have a job but thanks! It's for you to use as a model. If you don't need/want it let me know.

    Oh! You meant as a guide to writing my own. That would be cool.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 7:28 PM GMT
    in_this_corner saidWhat language do you program in?

    Java. I've used other languages in the past.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 7:30 PM GMT
    Goodwill Industries.

    There have been a lot of clothes donated lately to take advantage of the tax deduction while it's still around, so there may be slightly used, slightly out-dated suits avail for about $20.

    Why spend more than that for a one-time interview? If you'll never wear it again, that is.
    I needed a suit for a funeral recently & last minute and mine was at dry-cleaners, so I bought a 3 piece navy blue wool suit that only needed the leg hemmed slightly. Cost: $25.00
    icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 7:30 PM GMT
    I haven't interviewed in 15 yrs for a job, but...

    Keep your resume in reverse chronological order when it comes to listing your past work. In the list of tasks/achievements list them in order of importance. Read through the job listing, if you are applying to a specific one, and pick words from there to describe your skills/achievements.

    I don't think you need a suit for a programmer position. If you do have one, then great. If not a crisp shirt that fits well (same for pants) with a tie should do. Also be groomed i.e. no bed-hair or unruly beard. Also if you get called in for a second follow up interview, don't change your appearance dramatically. e.g. long hair to shaved head.

    Careful in listing you tel nbr online you'll get stupid spam calls (I did).

    Make a list of questions that you want to ask (other than salary and work hours/benefits). Some companies will offer you the opportunity ti ask them questions at the end of the interview. Show that you are prepared. So ask a few questions about the company (do some research first) and some that relate to the job (i.e. do you have a work-life balance policy? if so could you explain to me what that policy is?)

    For a programmer some company's will ask you to do a written test (we used to ask questions in the past but people lie. so now they have to do a test at the end of the interview)

    This is an interesting site that I came across a while back http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/GuerrillaInterviewing3.html
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 11, 2013 7:36 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidLooking back over the last thirty years, it would have really helped to have some training and experience in basic prostitution.


    +1

    Knowing how to be pleasant in a terrible interview is important