Pronunciation: Useful tool

  • beaujangle

    Posts: 1701

    Jan 15, 2013 9:36 AM GMT
    This free online dictionary is so helpful if you're not sure how to pronounce words like 'esprit de corps'!

    http://dictionary.reference.com/

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    Jan 15, 2013 6:38 PM GMT
    beaujangle saidThis free online dictionary is so helpful if you're not sure how to pronounce words like 'esprit de corps'!

    http://dictionary.reference.com/



    But that's not how you should prononce it! ;)
  • beaujangle

    Posts: 1701

    Jan 15, 2013 7:03 PM GMT
    Isugemi said
    beaujangle saidThis free online dictionary is so helpful if you're not sure how to pronounce words like 'esprit de corps'!

    http://dictionary.reference.com/



    But that's not how you should prononce it! ;)



    Do you mean it's pronounced wrongly?
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    Jan 15, 2013 7:55 PM GMT
    colonialRule said
    beaujangle said
    Isugemi said
    beaujangle saidThis free online dictionary is so helpful if you're not sure how to pronounce words like 'esprit de corps'!
    http://dictionary.reference.com/

    But that's not how you should prononce it! ;)

    Do you mean it's pronounced wrongly?

    It is not wrong. Don't forget it is a (lexical) Gallicism in an English dictionary. So words won't be necessary pronounced exactly as in the language the stem from.
    Take Büro in German or Chance in German, they are originally French but any German professor would teach you to pronounce them so that you sound natural while speaking German, not French.

    You are French, just think about how you people pronounce your Anglicismes. icon_cool.gif


    I know icon_smile.gif it was just a joke you know.
    I totally know the way we prononce parking or sweat shirt is very funny for you guys
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    Jan 15, 2013 10:48 PM GMT
    There are some foreign words and phrases that are so commonly used that you would do well to try and pronounce them as closely to the original language as possible or else you will sound like a dolt to even the most linguistically challanged. Esprit de corps is one such phrase. Imagine how idiotic you will sound if you said "es spirit dee corpse."

    Now there are some words that we have absorbed into English so completely that we are perfectly correct in pronouncing them Anglicized. Rodeo comes to mind. The only time we say ro DAY O is in reference to the drive in Hollywood, California. Imagine the looks you would get from people (outside the Southwest) if you said ro DAY oh in reference to the western roping and riding competition because the accepted English pronounciation is ro DEE oh
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    Jan 15, 2013 11:08 PM GMT
    Even though I'm a native Spanish speaker, I generally pronounce common Spanish words in English the typical English (or rather American) way unless it's someone's name.

    For example, I'll say: /seən fɹɛnsɪskoʊ/ (if you read IPA) instead of the native Spanish /san franθisko/.
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    Jan 15, 2013 11:14 PM GMT
    nicodegallo saidEven though I'm a native Spanish speaker, I generally pronounce common Spanish words in English the typical English (or rather American) way unless it's a proper name.


    I tried once for fun to ask for a brownie in a bakery. I prononced it the American way and she didn't undertsand. Then I pointed it with my figer and she said "oh! a brroo-nee?"
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jan 15, 2013 11:16 PM GMT
    what if you put the wrong emPHAsis on the wrong syLABle?
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    Jan 15, 2013 11:16 PM GMT
    Hehe, you also have to take into account all the different accents in English. Vowels and diphthongs show considerable variation throughout the world and are always shifting. What a dictionary says is "standard" pronunciation can be very different in real life, especially local names of places (e.g. "Appalachia").