Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD)

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 26, 2008 5:45 AM GMT
    Hey guys...saw this on you tube:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyZQ8jmGBRE

    Has anybody ever experienced Body Dysmorphic Disorder or know someone who has? Is this Showtime show legit?
  • dfrourke

    Posts: 1062

    Sep 26, 2008 6:44 AM GMT
    this is legit...and described in detail in the DSM [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual] for therapists...it combines obsessive/compulsive aspects of an individual and their preoccupation with their looks...most who suffer this disorder believe they are irrevocably ugly or defective...

    Check out the book THE ADONIS COMPLEX which discusses how BDD is influenced by media and marketing changes in American society...it is a VERY interesting read...

    - David icon_wink.gif
  • Powertrip

    Posts: 64

    Sep 26, 2008 6:53 AM GMT
    It is real pap... like vigorexia which has been said will be included in the next version of the DSM's (DSM V). Lifters should be aware of these disorders and know they could become obssesed with gains or looks and end up developing some of this.
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Sep 26, 2008 9:32 AM GMT
    Yes it's real ...

    it's not the obsessed gay guy who constantly complains about his abs
    it's a real disorder where men actually see something different in the mirror
    than what the rest of the world sees

    I once dated a man
    absolutely adorably cute with a body to match
    who had this disorder
    and became painfully shy and was seeing a therapist
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    Sep 26, 2008 6:21 PM GMT
    i have had it, though I don't think it was a constant body dysmorphia. When i first lost my weight and was between 180 and 183, (about 10 lbs away from ultimate goal) from my former 255/260 body. I would look in mirror and still see the fat. After gaining about 25 lbs from steroids and antibiotics, I now look back at pictures I took, and can't believe how good I looked. lol now on road back to losing the weight I gained from medical complications, and definitely going to take pictures weekly or every other week to see progress.
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    Sep 26, 2008 6:32 PM GMT
    I had / have it. I had it SEVERELY in highschool and undergrad. I sought out help but didn't really work for me.

    It exists and in my opinion, is the scariest of all diseases. A lot of people ask me why and they just don't get that I cannot see what I really look like. Some people think it is just a queen being a queen but it isn't. I honestly (less now) look at myself in the mirror and all I see is fat globs.

    I am not looking for compliments I am not looking for sympathy, I just want people to be aware that dysmorphic individuals need help. I am so thankful that I had one person (fraternity brother) when I was in undergrad who helped me through it.

    I remember getting into a screaming match with my good friend. I was squeezing the sh*t out of my stomach yanking on fat screaming, "Look at it! Look at all this fat, F*****************CK" He screamed back, "you are not fat, dammit, you are so far from it." To which I quickly replied, "WTF DO YOU THINK ALL OF THIS IS?" He calmly replied, "Skin, Dan, it's skin."

    icon_sad.gif
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    Sep 26, 2008 6:51 PM GMT
    I believe it is true. It is the main thing my partner and I argue about. He keeps saying I am sick. When I look in the mirror I see a fat ugly person. I can never be thin enough. I used to do a lot of drugs and at one point I had a 30 inch waist and people said my face was really sunk in. Even then when I looked in the mirror, I saw a fat ugly guy. I now have a 32 inch waist and I know the number is good, but I still see a very fat guy. I am not looking for compliments or pity. I just know it is true. My partner gets really mad at me because he is a little over weight and he thinks I am getting too skinny. It is weird.
  • reliable1

    Posts: 65

    Sep 26, 2008 8:22 PM GMT
    It's fairly well known these days. The type that is probably least understood is muscle dysmorphia. While the anorexic side has a longer history of research, the "muscle dysmorphia" side isn't known as well. It's also kind of hard to recognize because it can be linked with avoiding others, so those who have it aren't likelyt ob speak up about it.
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    Sep 27, 2008 12:30 AM GMT
    My first boyfriend had this and I wasn't aware of its existence. It's amazing how one's mind can extremely distort reality to the point where they're unrecognizable to themselves.

    He tried killing himself multiple times but eventually got a hold of it when his father stopped beating the shit out of him.
  • SanEsteban

    Posts: 454

    Sep 27, 2008 1:08 AM GMT
    It is very real. I have it. I used to weigh 160 lbs more than I do now. My waist size was a 44-46, my chest size was a 54. I now have a 32 inch waist and 42 in chest BUT, when I look in the mirror, I am completely dissatisfied with my look and still see a fat guy looking back. I, at times, have lost even more weight to the point people get concerned about me thinking I have become very ill. It is when people show concern for me that I know that I have gone too far! It is horrible to not be able to see yourself how you really are. It doesn't do much for a person's self image. icon_sad.gif
  • MuslDrew

    Posts: 463

    Sep 27, 2008 1:41 AM GMT
    dfrourke saidthis is legit...and described in detail in the DSM [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual] for therapists...it combines obsessive/compulsive aspects of an individual and their preoccupation with their looks...most who suffer this disorder believe they are irrevocably ugly or defective...

    Check out the book THE ADONIS COMPLEX which discusses how BDD is influenced by media and marketing changes in American society...it is a VERY interesting read...

    - David icon_wink.gif


    Adonis Complex is a great read on this topic.
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    Sep 27, 2008 2:04 AM GMT
    I've been told i have dismorphic complexes but I must say i don't really believe it. I mean everyone has insecurities about their bodies and I know there are some people for whom it is a debilitating psychiatric condition but most people are over reacting.

    Every instance of teenage anxiety isn't a complex and when people think there is something wrong with them, that they are ugly, fat, depressed, overanxious, hyperactive.

    I think the worst thing society can do is say "well actually yes there is something wrong with you and you are flawed but it isn't that what you think according to "Not a real Dr feelgoodhappyflowersunshine" your have the latest condition they have discovered and the media has latched on to sell a book.
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    Sep 27, 2008 2:15 AM GMT
    I have to agree with what has already been said. It does exist. And The Adonis Complex is a fascinating read. I read it years ago when it was first published.
  • nero444

    Posts: 1

    Sep 27, 2008 4:33 AM GMT
    Yes, Dysmorphia is real... on top of THE ADONIS COMPLEX book mentioned by several of you there is another great book written by one of the same doctor's called, THE BROKEN MIRROR. it's a great companion to THE ADONIS COMPLEX book.

    I think we all have insecurities and complex's but when you think you are so repulsive you'd rather commit suicide then I think it's a BIG issue that needs to be dealt with by trained professionals. There is a fine line between exercising for health/beauty reasons AND commiting several hours to the gym every day trying to fix something that doesn't really need fixing. interesting topic.

    i also checked out this "teaser trailer" and found the show on the Showtime website here is a link to the dates and times... I'm going to tune in and see the angle this short film takes on the subject matter.

    http://www.sho.com/site/schedules/product_page.do?seriesid=0&episodeid=133892
  • automatthew

    Posts: 4

    Oct 03, 2008 11:28 PM GMT
    from the amazon.com blurb on the adonis complex...

    "What's the solution? The authors list some Web sites to help men suffering from the Adonis Complex to find therapists familiar with the problem. Sometimes antidepressants can work. But for most people, the answer is to understand that the images of perfect male physiques they see are unattainable, and that no one really expects them to look like that anyway."

    except that plenty of gay men really do expect you to look this way.

    and in fact this website is dedicated to it.
  • automatthew

    Posts: 4

    Oct 03, 2008 11:29 PM GMT
    the "real" in realjock recalls fairly clearly the image we're all supposed to be striving for.
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    Oct 04, 2008 3:09 AM GMT

    we spend an entire semester in medical school discussing psychological disorders. We studied this one at length. Statistically, it primarily affects gay men, and teenage girls from the upper-middle class.
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    Oct 04, 2008 4:53 AM GMT
    collegeswimmr said
    we spend an entire semester in medical school discussing psychological disorders. We studied this one at length. Statistically, it primarily affects gay men, and teenage girls from the upper-middle class.


    Why do you think it affects gay men so much?
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    Oct 04, 2008 5:21 AM GMT
    Ryan35 said
    Why do you think it affects gay men so much?

    Look at the advertisements on this site or the men who have been "hotlisted" the most. We strive to be the most sexually desired "thing". Straight boys don't care. They treat a girl like shit and she comes crawling back for more in spite of their fat, ugly, nasty habits.
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    Oct 04, 2008 8:21 AM GMT
    Ryan35 said
    collegeswimmr said
    we spend an entire semester in medical school discussing psychological disorders. We studied this one at length. Statistically, it primarily affects gay men, and teenage girls from the upper-middle class.


    Why do you think it affects gay men so much?


    Well no one knows EXACTLY what causes or why it affects these demographics. Research has linked it with Generalized Anxiety Disorder, OCD, and eating disorders; all of which are also more prevalent in upper class females and gay men.

    There was a study conducted at UCLA that sheds some light on the issue. They found through MRIs that people affected with BDD use the left side of the brain more frequently, which is responsible for analyzing complex tasks and images. That may account for the patients' 'fixation' on a body part or their general appearance.

    Aside from chemical imbalances that can influence it, there's no real biological or evolutionary reason for Body Dismorphia to exist among gay men. It's more of a cultural phenomenon, seen mainly in Western societies. What exactly drives it might be a good subject to discuss. And a great PhD dissertation.

    I'm curious about what others think.
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    Oct 04, 2008 12:43 PM GMT
    automatthew saidthe "real" in realjock recalls fairly clearly the image we're all supposed to be striving for.

    I dunno, to me being a "real"jock isn't about having big muscles or looking like a Greek statue, to me being a "real"jock is a state of mind. I, for example, am a bike commuter, I play field hockey, cycle, swim, do triathlons, hike, climb, and in general am down for playing almost any sport, all with the average body I have. To me, I'm more of a "real"jock than gym bunnies who spend 30 hours a week in the gym just to have pretty shiny muscles to look at.

    I think the insidiousness of BDD is that if you read about it, I'm sure if you read over some of the compulsive behaviors/symptoms of it, almost anyone will notice a couple of things they do that are BDD-like. I'm sure I've known people with it, even if they haven't told me, and I have some friends who would probably never admit it, but definitely have it.

    But all in all, BDD is the simple one. It's BIID that just blows my mind.
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    Oct 15, 2013 12:25 AM GMT
    Body Dysmorphic Disorder, or BDD as it often called, is very real. I've struggled with it since I was 15, always believing that I was ugly and had the face that only a mother could love. I still believe that today, but I've learned to live with it better than I have in the past. Medication has also helped me. I take 150mg of Sertraline daily and it makes things tolerable for me.

    From what I've read, BDD affects between 2-3 million people in the US.
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    Oct 15, 2013 1:30 AM GMT
    True.

    You could probably say that about quite a few mental issues.

    It doesn't make it any less hard on the people who suffer from them though. For many years I was on 200mg of Sertraline (generic Zoloft) daily, and have now been reduced to 150mg, which keeps things manageable.
  • Trajen1

    Posts: 115

    Oct 15, 2013 1:48 AM GMT
    I currently struggle with this, even with my roommates trying to help me. When i look in the mirror I see an upper body that's too small and a waist that's too big. I never think I am in shape enough, despite maintaining a perfect physical fitness score for the United States Marine Corps fitness test (which I acknowledge is decently hard). It honestly makes life harder to enjoy.
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    Oct 15, 2013 1:59 AM GMT
    Trajen1 saidI currently struggle with this, even with my roommates trying to help me. When i look in the mirror I see an upper body that's too small and a waist that's too big. I never think I am in shape enough, despite maintaining a perfect physical fitness score for the United States Marine Corps fitness test (which I acknowledge is decently hard). It honestly makes life harder to enjoy.


    I can't believe that you would suffer from BDD. Just be glad you don't look into the mirror and see something like me.