Have you tried Shirataki?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 20, 2013 10:26 PM GMT
    I've not tried it yet, but Shirataki is a noodle that mimics spaghetti and is made from tofu and is known for having little carbs or calories, yet high in fiber. I've managed to cut out potatoes and most carbs out of my diet (still hanging onto homemade sourdough, though...) and these noodles intrigue me.

    I want to add these to my hot & sour soup, but the directions seem strange, saying, "Parboil for 2-3 minutes to reduce the aromatic aroma, then dry very well and use as you would any regular cooked noodle."

    Should I be cautious, i.e., "reduce the aromatic aroma," and, "dry very well?" With what? A pasta drying rack...a paper towel...a strainer?

    Or, could I rinse them and put 'em into the soup?
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    Jan 20, 2013 10:32 PM GMT
    Sounds complicated.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 20, 2013 10:54 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidSounds complicated.

    It became simple...i did parboil them for 2 minutes then added them to my soup. To me, drying them seemed just kinda dumb, and the noodles still behaved properly. They really are GREAT noodles, both in texture and flavor to replace a carb noodle.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Jan 21, 2013 11:37 PM GMT
    Can you get them in most Asian stores?
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    Jan 21, 2013 11:43 PM GMT
    smudgetool said"Parboil for 2-3 minutes to reduce the aromatic aroma, then dry very well and use as you would any regular cooked noodle."
    I think that means "cook and strain" in English icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 22, 2013 7:10 AM GMT
    To the OP:

    For soups, or anything where the noodle will be immersed in a watery fluid for a long time, I recommend shirataki or konnyaku over the shirataki/tofu blend. The reason being is that the blended noodles are a lot softer, and just won't hold up very well. The pure shirataki or konnyaku will keep its "al dente" texture.

    Shirataki/tofu noodles could be OK if the entire soup will be immediately eaten... just don't put the noodles in until the very end of the preparation of the soup. Otherwise, they might disintegrate during cooking.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 22, 2013 7:11 AM GMT
    My father once ate shairataki

    And then she died.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 22, 2013 7:13 AM GMT
    Crimsonnclover saidMy father once ate shairataki

    And then she died.


    Wow. Do you have anything useful to post?



    *crickets*



    I didn't think so. icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 22, 2013 7:15 AM GMT
    intensity69 said
    Crimsonnclover saidMy father once ate shairataki

    And then she died.


    Wow. Do you have anything useful to post?



    *crickets*



    I didn't think so. icon_rolleyes.gif


    Someone piss in your granola bar, man?

    Douche.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 22, 2013 7:18 AM GMT
    Crimsonnclover said
    intensity69 said
    Crimsonnclover saidMy father once ate shairataki

    And then she died.


    Wow. Do you have anything useful to post?



    *crickets*



    I didn't think so. icon_rolleyes.gif


    Someone piss in your granola bar, man?

    Douche.


    Uppity troll is uppity. icon_lol.gif

    OK, I'd best stop now...


    335088-dont_feed_the_trolls_super.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 22, 2013 7:25 AM GMT
    intensity69 said
    Crimsonnclover said
    intensity69 said
    Crimsonnclover saidMy father once ate shairataki

    And then she died.


    Wow. Do you have anything useful to post?



    *crickets*



    I didn't think so. icon_rolleyes.gif


    Someone piss in your granola bar, man?

    Douche.


    Uppity troll is uppity. icon_lol.gif

    OK, I'd best stop now...


    335088-dont_feed_the_trolls_super.jpg


    I am content for now icon_twisted.gif
    On a serious note I really should try this shirataki stuff, my roommate is always putting it in chicken broths she makes but frankly, it looks kinda weird.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 22, 2013 7:26 AM GMT
    yourname2000 said
    intensity69 saidUppity troll is uppity. icon_lol.gif

    Yeah babe...this is the guy who just made the joke "did he give you the AIDS?" in this thread: http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/2952826 ...'cos ya know, AIDS jokes are just so funny. icon_rolleyes.gif


    I hadn't noticed that thread. Well, that's confirmed then.
  • Beeftastic

    Posts: 1747

    Jan 22, 2013 8:01 AM GMT
    I used Shiritaki noodles when I was on my diet. The main ingredient is a kind of Yam fiber.

    There are pure shiritaki noodles that are almost all fiber with almost no carbs in them. They are more chewy/rubbery and are brownish/clear and sometimes have a fishy kind of taste. Then there is a type with tofu in them. They are about 20% tofu and they are not as chewy, a white color, and they have some carbs in them.

    They are a great way to add more food to your meal without adding hardly any calories. And the fiber is really good for you.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 26, 2013 5:18 AM GMT
    I've never noticed a fish odor or taste but find the gummy product to be largely unpalatable except in soups. At perhaps 20 calories this popular hybrid tofu shirataki noodle tastes better than a similar 0 calorie, pure konjac root product but in terms of appealing taste and texture is still a far cry from wheat, rice and corn-based pastas. Personally, while I keep shirataki noodles on hand and was recently surprised to find them on my local supermarket's shelf (Waldbaums) I presently get my primary carb "fixes" in descending order from steel cut oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, sweet potatoes and Ezekial sprouted grain pasta.

    The tofu-free, zero carb, zero calorie version is konjac root and often goes by the brand name "Miracle Noodle" which is overpriced; you can get the same product cheaper from Konjac (http://www.konjacfoods.com/). Aside from the caloric (0) and digestive advantages, the advantage of either, each made from 100% konjac root, is that like shirataki noodles they don't need to be cooked or boiled, just run hot water over them. The disadvantage is the taste and texture; both pure konjac brands are very rubbery and spongey and frankly upon chewing taste the way I'd imagine spun extruded polyester would.
  • Kriss

    Posts: 690

    Jan 27, 2013 2:10 AM GMT
    had some a few months ago and it was DELICIOUS!!! Definitely would recommend it as a new dish to try, gonna have to ask and find out how they make it I want restaurant quality now! Lol