Peanuts, Dairy, Wheat. Overhyped?

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    Jan 21, 2013 10:14 PM GMT
    The Ukrainian Cossack in me says: WTF? No Wheat?
    Allergies notwithstanding, does the whole glutenandlactoseareevilandmustdie thing seem to be getting a little bit absurd?
    Maybe it's because I eat for pleasure...
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    Jan 21, 2013 10:45 PM GMT
    There is nothing wrong with wheat (for most people). It's just trendy for people who have no adverse reaction to it to avoid it or claim it is harmful to them.
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    Jan 21, 2013 10:57 PM GMT
    I changed recently to oats or brown rice bread instead of wheat. Non-homogenized organic whole milk, home made plain yogurt. You can continue eating what you like. But there are definite alternatives that are healthier and the public has been lead to unhealthy eating habits. With the low salt diets they don't tell you but you also now have to supplement that with iodine tablets and selenium. I was just getting into loving wheat breads too. My Dad almost died from colon cancer so that woke me up. My friend almost died from thyroid deficiencies that caused a heart attack so he educated me on what not to eat.
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    Jan 21, 2013 11:05 PM GMT
    Eat what you want to eat as long as you're not allergic to it.

    Keep the less-than-healthy foods to a minimum.

    It's really that simple.
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    Jan 21, 2013 11:05 PM GMT
    The one thing that gets me about nut allergies is how intense they seem to be. It's like most people with a nut allergy are highly sensitive. I won't forget that story about a teenage girl in Quebec who died from an allergic reaction because her boyfriend kissed her having had a peanut butter sandwich earlier in the day icon_eek.gif
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    Jan 22, 2013 1:37 AM GMT
    Humano saidThere is nothing wrong with wheat (for most people). It's just trendy for people who have no adverse reaction to it to avoid it or claim it is harmful to them.


    As often as I hear this opinion, I have never met anyone who refuses to eat wheat without having celiacs or an intolerance of some sort--of whom i have met many.
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    Jan 22, 2013 3:07 AM GMT
    Some schools are banning students from bringing certain foods to school due to food allergies. icon_neutral.gif
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    Jan 30, 2013 7:06 AM GMT
    Aress saidThe Ukrainian Cossack in me says: WTF? No Wheat?
    Allergies notwithstanding, does the whole glutenandlactoseareevilandmustdie thing seem to be getting a little bit absurd?
    Maybe it's because I eat for pleasure...



    I have them all, dont care what anyone thinks, for years, the "experts" have gone back and forth, whats good, then its bad, then its good again, then its bad again...blah, blah, if you have no medical problems with any of these, then go for it, dont want to deprive yourself the pleasure because somebody else has a problem with these foods and is probably disgruntled. Case in point....conservative wench Elisabeth Hasselbeck brought to EVERYONES attention that SHE has a gluten problem, so now the whole world must listen to TV mind control and go gluten free cause some no talent personality has a problem with wheat. Wheat was good, before Lizzy said it wasnt. I wish more people would think for themselves and not be blindly lead by the blind.

    I eat meat, eggs and tuna, protein baby!
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    Jan 30, 2013 8:35 AM GMT
    I think the reason it seems to be getting out of hand is that science is advancing and as a species we are realizing that some foods might not be great for us in large quantities. Also, I do believe that some people jump on these bandwagons without doing their own research.

    If you get knee deep in the literature on the topic of gluten intolerance there are all kinds of nuances that matter. Certain kinds of wheat contain more gluten than others... different types of gluten exist... etc. Also, the intolerance is a spectrum. Some people seem to have no symptoms, and others can have symptoms and reactions that define them as "celiac." So when someone says that not eating wheat makes them feel better, please believe them. They know their body better than anyone else does.

    It took me 8 years (since I began high school) to figure out what the hell was wrong with me and my stomach. I thought that everyone had cramps and bloating after eating their meals. Nope. It was a wheat and gluten intolerance. I'm wheat free for about 1.5 years no and I have never felt better in my life. I don't test positive for celiacs disease either. So I an a random, nebulous, wheat intolerant person. My recommendation to everyone that asks me questions is to try it for 60 days and see how you feel. If you feel better, then you know.

    I cheat every 3 weeks or so for some pancakes... I always regret it, but in the happiest of ways.
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    Jan 30, 2013 9:26 AM GMT
    As a Dietitian in Private Practice, I have seen first hand what a reduced wheat diet can do to someone's improved quality of life. Now we are talking intolerances here rather than allergies/something more serious alongside the coelic disease/inflammatory bowel disease line.

    Did you know that actually most humans naturally mal-absorb excess amounts of wheat. However this does not necessarily equate to symptoms of bloating, wind, constipation, lethargy etc. Some people have more sensitive nerve gut endings than others. The degree of sensitivity can vary from as little as 1/2 slice of bread to being OK with 2 slices but not more.

    I had a client who had longstanding constipation and pain, and since going low fructans and galacto-oligosaccharides (which encompasses 'wheat') has never felt better in 6 years.

    Perhaps this is where all the hype is with the wheat free/gluten free diet. Take a look as Novak Djokovic for example, when he went gluten free, there came an improved tennis game and results.

    So I think whilst I don't think we can just place as wheat as the culprit. It's important to note that research does show it can be a problem food. And some people do benefit from a low wheat diet.
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    Jan 30, 2013 9:26 AM GMT
    yeah a friend was trying to influence me by getting me not to eat wheat, based on a paleo diet. i did try it and it made me miserable and not have energy but when i eat wheat i feel so much better and my strength in gym or playing sports is off the roof by a huge margin. i can never replace wheat's effectiveness with other carb sources it's my bread and butter.

    I can however understand if wheat doesnt work for my friend as he's irish and they don't have wheat as part of their culture. where as mine has wheat in everything including desert and snacks.
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    Jan 30, 2013 1:04 PM GMT
    I discuss diet with my general practitioner and a separate licensed nutritionist...

    I asked both if I should consider a gluten free diet and they said the same thing - 'No. You would know if you were having a reaction to gluten. If you were then I would say go gluten-free. There are no real benefits switching to a gluten-free diet if you are gluten tolerant. Most people would gain more benefit from eating more fresh fruits/vegetables.'

    My diet is primarily low fat protein and fresh vegetables. I eat Irish steel-cut oatmeal and maybe two slices of whole grain bread a week. If feel like crap if I eat a lot of breads, chips, crackers - the common snacks foods or plate fillers. I don't think it's an allergy issue. It's more of an overeating problem and my colon just gets backed up with too much crap to process.
  • mz29xy

    Posts: 37

    Jan 31, 2013 2:09 AM GMT
    I'll drop my two cents here. As preface, I'm a CHHC (Cert Holistic Health Pract) and researcher.

    The gluten in wheat can damage the vili in the intestinal wall. These villi absorb nutrients, putting them directly into the blood stream as well as manufacture vitamins themselves.

    Regardless of whether you get celiac symptoms or not gluten can damage your villi to some degree, even so, wheat can be a non issue - depending on the health of your digestive tract and overall consumption.

    A journal study I read (can't remember the source), came to the finding that low levels of vitamin C can contribute to gluten intolerance. Side note, the vitamin C is stores is often just asorbic acid, which is just one element that makes up vitamin C in an orange per se and is often created in a lab synthetically. Alama C is a better, natural source for vitamin C.

    A lot of people have sensitivity to other grain proteins that are not well known or tested for like lectin. So you might be buying gluten free when for an individual, lectin could be the problem.

    You can have sensitivity or immune reactions that are not anaphylactic or cause digestive discomfort. This usually comes from having a degraded digestive tract where you actually have holes allowing certain food particles into the blood stream. When this happens your body goes into leukocytosis where the body tags/attacks that food every time you eat it, but you may not get symptoms. All the while this food is causing your immune system to work harder and go into attack mode.....wheat is one of those foods that can damage/puncture the actual lining of the intestines, causing these little holes.

    I'm not saying don't eat wheat, or gluten. Just do most everything in moderation and slow down enough where you can actually LISTEN to your body.

    Side note: Much of the upswing in autoimmune diseases over the past 200 years has more to do with what is lacking from the human organism than what we put into it. Moises Velasquez-Manoff explains this well in "An Epidemic of Absence."

    Yours in health icon_biggrin.gif
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Jan 31, 2013 2:12 AM GMT
    Eat with you want with variation and restraint. Wheat is only a problem if you have an allergy, intolerance, or don't vary your carb intake. Also a concern to me is GMO. I prefer to use native, organic varieties of wheat.