Whey Protein & Casein

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    Jan 22, 2013 12:56 AM GMT
    It's time to buy Protein/Casein, and after reading several reviews, I can truly say I am confused as to what protein to go for.

    I was previously taking the Cytosport 100% Whey Protein found at my local Costco for about $48 for a 6lb bag. Read reviews, and people said it was a good basic protein, but not recommended for building.

    Because of that, I looked into others. Gold Standard 100% percent Whey Protein seems to be a popular choice on bodybuilding.com. Is that any good for building? 5lbs go for $54 at GNC.

    Also saw on this site that Myotein is a great protein, but it's about $60-65 for one bottle, which has 30 38gram servings.

    I don't want to take lots of supplements, so I'd rather go for a quality protein & casein. What do you guys recommend??

    I just got pills for my EFAs, and I plan on taking the Men's One a Day.
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    Jan 22, 2013 1:08 AM GMT
    I've heard there's protein powders that are a combination of Whey and Casein too. Are those any good?

    I do plan on getting a whey protein for post-workouts, and a casein protein to take before bed.
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    Jan 22, 2013 1:39 AM GMT
    http://www.gnc.com/product/index.jsp?productId=11300862&cp=3703232

    There's the link to the product. It's Optimum Nutrition - Platinum Hydro Builder
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    Jan 22, 2013 5:18 AM GMT
    I ended up getting that Platinum Hydro Builder (4lbs for $65) and Gold Standard Casein (2lbs for $40) from GNC.
  • Medjai

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    Jan 22, 2013 5:25 AM GMT
    I always use whey isolate, because I'm lactose intolerant. I got 6lbs for $50 on sale at Popeyes. It's great stuff.

    I supplement with protein bars during the day too.
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    Jan 22, 2013 5:34 AM GMT
    I've been using Optimum Nutrition Platinum Hydro Whey because I've very lactose intolerant. My suggestion would be to read the labels and see how much protein you're really getting versus fillers, sweeteners, etc. I usually try a smaller container from some place like GNC to see if it will upset my stomach, but once I know I'll like something, I save money by buying online from Amazon.com or somewhere else.
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    Jan 23, 2013 7:48 AM GMT
    alex1990 saidI've heard there's protein powders that are a combination of Whey and Casein too. Are those any good?

    I do plan on getting a whey protein for post-workouts, and a casein protein to take before bed.


    I'm not too much of a muscle builder, more of runner. But the purpose of combining the two different types of proteins is that together they allow the body to be exposed to a more consistent level of protein. Consuming just whey leaves your body less protein after a few hours since the proteins are quickly hydrolyzed, consuming just casein means your body doesn't have the protein post workout since it takes some time to hydrolyze it. Consumption of both provides a more even distribution.

    Whey -> quick
    Soy -> Moderate
    Casein -> Long time

    Most shakes that use this idea also contain soy. A lot of people don't know however that the protein you put into your body doesn't just turn all into muscle, but unless you are taking steroids, a majority of it gets deaminized into something people can consider as carbs (technically it isn't a carbohydrate but there isn't an easy way to put it :/ ).

    Most people don't actually need protein supplements.
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    Jan 23, 2013 9:50 PM GMT
    I eat most of my protein in meats, eggs, and nuts; but I also do Gold Standard casein protein when I have to work a long day without a lunch. It keeps me from getting hungry.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Jan 23, 2013 9:57 PM GMT
    GregJorn said
    alex1990 saidI've heard there's protein powders that are a combination of Whey and Casein too. Are those any good?

    I do plan on getting a whey protein for post-workouts, and a casein protein to take before bed.


    I'm not too much of a muscle builder, more of runner. But the purpose of combining the two different types of proteins is that together they allow the body to be exposed to a more consistent level of protein. Consuming just whey leaves your body less protein after a few hours since the proteins are quickly hydrolyzed, consuming just casein means your body doesn't have the protein post workout since it takes some time to hydrolyze it. Consumption of both provides a more even distribution.

    Whey -> quick
    Soy -> Moderate
    Casein -> Long time

    Most shakes that use this idea also contain soy. A lot of people don't know however that the protein you put into your body doesn't just turn all into muscle, but unless you are taking steroids, a majority of it gets deaminized into something people can consider as carbs (technically it isn't a carbohydrate but there isn't an easy way to put it :/ ).

    Most people don't actually need protein supplements.


    It depends on the dose. The limiting factor is cellular demand. Your body will uptake all the protein you throw at it. However, if your body is only using 30g an hour for homeostasis and cellular repair, the rest will go to energy stores.

    You can't really say 'majority' without knowing demands and consumption, and full use is not dependent on steroids. You're right in some cases, but it is not a fair generalization.
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    Jan 23, 2013 10:00 PM GMT
    cottage cheese wih pineapple before bed - love it
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    Jan 23, 2013 10:05 PM GMT
    Resist GNC. So over priced. Get your supplements at www.bodybuilding.com. I don't work for either. Even with shipping bb.com will be cheaper. Plus all supplements have reviews. Try it. And MetRx makes a combination protein whey and casein.
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    Jan 25, 2013 7:18 AM GMT
    Whey protein isolate is a winner for me. I've used Davinci (expensive) and NOW (affordable) and liked both. It has aminos but no artificial sweeteners or additives. Good bang for your buck - good protein, lowest calories. I usually add in some glutamine powder, too.

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    Jan 25, 2013 7:50 AM GMT
    peronally i think the only difference in the expensive proteins and the cheap ones is taste and how they blend/mix..at least as far as generic whey proteins go, they branch out into different types of whey, isolate, hydrolized, etc etc, usually off season any brand of whey protein will do, as long as im getting the bang for my buck, closer to shows and or cutting diets, i opt for the more expensive merely for the taste.
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    Jan 25, 2013 9:51 AM GMT
    Medjai said
    GregJorn said
    alex1990 saidI've heard there's protein powders that are a combination of Whey and Casein too. Are those any good?

    I do plan on getting a whey protein for post-workouts, and a casein protein to take before bed.




    It depends on the dose. The limiting factor is cellular demand. Your body will uptake all the protein you throw at it. However, if your body is only using 30g an hour for homeostasis and cellular repair, the rest will go to energy stores.

    You can't really say 'majority' without knowing demands and consumption, and full use is not dependent on steroids. You're right in some cases, but it is not a fair generalization.


    30g of protein an hour seems absurdly high, where did you get that number? The DV for protein, depending on the individual, is roughly (per pound)

    Sedentary adult 0.4 g
    Active adult 0.4-0.6 g
    Growing athlete 0.6-0.9 g
    Adult building muscle mass 0.6-0.9 g

    Taken from here
    http://www.rice.edu/~jenky/caryn/protein.html
    http://www.menshealth.com/mhlists/guide-to-protein/recommended-protein-intake.php
    These have their own citations, you can find similar data anywhere on the web.

    Anyway, the daily values for highly active adults would be 96-144 grams a day, as you can probably see, 30 grams an hour is a bit high, 30*24=720? Even post workout consumption has the upper limit of 20 grams.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19056590
    aps.20gram.gif
    After 20 grams, higher levels of leucine oxidation of took place, which means that your body is just burning it as a source of fuel... not as part of the muscle building process.

    Considering that a single serving of Greek yogurt is about 11%-8% of the daily value (10 grams)... and that most people consume way more than just Greek yogurt in a day, the American diet is after all, meat heavy... you don't actually need supplements. So yes, the word, "majority" still holds.

    "Your body will uptake all the protein you throw at it." No, our digestive systems aren't as special as we think they are. Too much protein (say, 50g) in one sitting will result in a good amount that just gets excreted out as it doesn't stay in the digestive for too long. A portion of what you do absorb will also get deaminized. I remember an experiment in one of my biochemistry classes talking about consuming protein that has been labeled with Nitrogen-15 with varying quantities, and then looking at nitrogen-15 content in the urine and feces afterwards with a mass spec. Consuming small amounts of protein throughout the day ends up resulting in less nitrogen-15 in the urine (as urea) and feces (as undigested protein), which means that more of it is kept within the body. Consuming large quantities in few sessions results in larger proportions of nitrogen 15 in the urine and feces which means fewer amounts of that protein are kept in the body. These different cases all consumed the same amount of protein, just at different quantities and intervals. I'll try to find this study... but it's a pretty "duh" conclusion. This study had different methods than the one I mentioned above, but arrived at the same conclusions...

    The limiting factor is cellular demand, but 30 grams an hour, is, again, I hope you realize is ridiculously high. Cite your sources icon_razz.gif

    Some people may claim that high protein consumption is what got them buff, but in reality, it is probably more to do with their level of commitment... chugging down +200 grams of protein throughout the day takes a lot of determination and probably suppressed appetite and reduced their cravings for fattier foods...