Building and carpentry

  • goateeboynsc

    Posts: 15

    Jan 22, 2013 3:50 PM GMT
    COLORED TEXT GOES HERE Are there any gay men who like to use tools: hammers and nails & saws and build things?

    I like to build things.. I am actually building a shed right now. If you see this soon and know how help me build the shed roof. I am a handy man love using tools, as well as landscape etc.
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Jan 22, 2013 4:32 PM GMT
    The easiest way to do it is to make the front of the shed taller than the back of the shed that way you just notch out 2x4s and slope it back. You can use that roll type of roofing material and aluminum strip to fold over the sides of the roof to prevent the elements from rooting the wood.

    Something like this
    th?id=H.4846545059842008&pid=15.1
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Jan 22, 2013 4:46 PM GMT
    I've built a barn, three cabins and most of the furniture in the cabin I live in in the summer. Some of it's pretty crude - but it's fun and very satisfying!
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    Jan 22, 2013 5:23 PM GMT
    I was actually just last night thinking of building a low shed for the bikes while cleaning out the garage. I've gotten tired of the bikes in the house where I lean them against any wall so they're sort of in the way plus they bring in sand (not so much the roadie but the other two) and there's only room to hang two in the garage (I just started looking at a pulley/hoist system to install there). I'd rather they not be out in the Florida humidity. I did put the mtn bike in the garage already--too much dirt on those tires to have it in the house and I don't always rinse it-- and haven't noticed any ill effects, so am hoping a well-enough built shed will at least keep them secure and out of most weather.

    My building skills are minimal as I only started rehabbing some houses recently after not doing much with tools since gradeschool woodshop, but I'm pretty sure I can build one from scratch and not have it look too terrible; at least it should be functional. From previous work I've done in houses using so-called carpenters, it seems the best way to get a professional look is lots of molding over joints that didn't fit right and caulk. So much for the fit and finish of real joinery.

    When I googled to see if such a shed is manufactured I found very few and they seem to start at like $600. Pretty sure I can build for less. Also what I noticed is most of the googling brought up bike sheds in Europe, particularly the UK or in Australia/NZ with very little reference to bike sheds in America about which I wonder if that isn't telling of our car culture and the resultant larger garages. This is an old house though with a small garage and probably built when people just left their bikes outside to rust in the rain.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Jan 23, 2013 1:48 AM GMT
    Hell yeah. Bought a house and ripped it apart. I drew up architectural drawings of the final product. Rewired it and did all the walls and drywall. It sold in a day.
  • Fable

    Posts: 3866

    Jan 23, 2013 2:12 AM GMT
    Like any other fratboy.... I can fucking build stages for days.


    STAGES ANY SIZE
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    Jan 23, 2013 2:14 AM GMT
    Yes.
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    Jan 23, 2013 2:16 AM GMT
    I made a kickass ottoman this past year.
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    Jan 23, 2013 6:49 AM GMT
    Out of necessity, yes.

    Most recently, my foundation wall started to bow inward at an expense I would have to sell a kidney to finance.

    The structural engineer took pity on me and I repaired nearly all of it myself with periodic iinspection from the engineer.

    I like renovating except for the first time. Later attempts are always more satisfying with aquired knowledge.
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    Jan 23, 2013 7:02 AM GMT
    As a Visual Arts major we ended up doing a lot of wood working for our projects. I mostly applied mine to art pieces.

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    Jan 23, 2013 7:18 AM GMT
    Does being a digital artist count? I love to build architecture digitally. icon_biggrin.gif

    When I was a kid I use to always do things with my hands, drawing, building, lego fanatic... but then computers came out and my imagination had to explore its limits.
  • hebrewman

    Posts: 1367

    Jan 23, 2013 8:18 AM GMT
    i own a boat so yes, i have and use tools. lots and lots of tools. mechanical , plumbing, and electrical
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    Jan 23, 2013 12:57 PM GMT
    Heck yeah. I do most all of my own construction projects: carpentry, framing, drywall, plumbing, electrical, concrete, landscaping, etc. I just hate when it's time to paint. I paint with the best, but simply have no patience for it so these days that's one trade I hire in on projects.
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    Jan 23, 2013 3:15 PM GMT
    Yep since I was prob 6 or so helping dad build/ renovate. And hey it makes sense to build stuff yourself. Example a 10x10 storage unit around me is around 100 a month So I priced out lumber and made a plan and instead I built a 12x16 foot shed that's 2 stories tall( the loft is tall enough to walk upright in) and in 12 months it payed for itself..... storage problem solved. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jan 24, 2013 9:47 PM GMT
    Apparently now I'm also in the business of root removal. Just minutes ago while digging around the foundation to pressure clean and then paint the exterior below grade, I found this bad boy constricting around two sides of the house. In one direction it seems headed to the well. Not done digging though haven't found any cracks in the slab yet and the terrazzo inside is in excellent shape but had I let this go another 10 years it looks to me like it could crush something.

    IMG_2783_1resized_zps5d27b75b.jpg

    IMG_2782_1r_zps3f7066a8.jpg
  • thadjock

    Posts: 2183

    Jan 24, 2013 10:11 PM GMT
    Narciso saidAs a Visual Arts major we ended up doing a lot of wood working for our projects. I mostly applied mine to art pieces.

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    i luv this cum-rag chair.

    if if you're planning to do a series and need contributors, let me know.
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    Jan 24, 2013 10:36 PM GMT
    theantijock saidApparently now I'm also in the business of root removal. Just minutes ago while digging around the foundation to pressure clean and then paint the exterior below grade, I found this bad boy constricting around two sides of the house. In one direction it seems headed to the well. Not done digging though haven't found any cracks in the slab yet and the terrazzo inside is in excellent shape but had I let this go another 10 years it looks to me like it could crush something.

    IMG_2783_1resized_zps5d27b75b.jpg

    IMG_2782_1r_zps3f7066a8.jpg


    I had to trace one back from the other end a couple of years ago, in my parents house. There was this white - object that you could barely see down in the bottom of the toilet. I thought it was a stray rag or something. Couldn't ever seem to fish it out with a snake. Eventually, it became a real problem. It turned out to be a very finely divided mass of root hairs. It seems a very happy pine tree had somehow worked a root up between two sections of cast iron sewer pipe, then all the way up into the toilet. No wonder that one tree grew so big! I hacked it back as far as I could without jackhammering up the slab, and kept it at bay with a sock full of copper sulfate crystals. Yeah, one of these days, I'm going to have to gut that bathroom and hammer up the slab to get it out. Or just use a match to fix the whole place.
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    Jan 24, 2013 10:45 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidI had to trace one back from the other end a couple of years ago, in my parents house. There was this white - object that you could barely see down in the bottom of the toilet. I thought it was a stray rag or something. Couldn't ever seem to fish it out with a snake. Eventually, it became a real problem. It turned out to be a very finely divided mass of root hairs. It seems a very happy pine tree had somehow worked a root up between two sections of cast iron sewer pipe, then all the way up into the toilet. No wonder that one tree grew so big! I hacked it back as far as I could without jackhammering up the slab, and kept it at bay with a sock full of copper sulfate crystals. Yeah, one of these days, I'm going to have to gut that bathroom and hammer up the slab to get it out. Or just use a match to fix the whole place.


    Yikes. What a mess. I didn't even think of it getting into plumbing. I'm just trying to save the terrazzo. But I can see where that could turn into a very expensive problem.

    My other issue however is that I would hate for cutting this to damage the tree. I suppose it must have other roots too so I guess I can cut but then I don't see where I have a choice. I'm not certain but I think it comes from a neighbors live oak and maybe I should show them my problem before I do anything? I sent pics to my engineer brother and he says definitely I have to cut that.
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    Jan 24, 2013 10:55 PM GMT
    theantijock said
    mindgarden saidI had to trace one back from the other end a couple of years ago, in my parents house. There was this white - object that you could barely see down in the bottom of the toilet. I thought it was a stray rag or something. Couldn't ever seem to fish it out with a snake. Eventually, it became a real problem. It turned out to be a very finely divided mass of root hairs. It seems a very happy pine tree had somehow worked a root up between two sections of cast iron sewer pipe, then all the way up into the toilet. No wonder that one tree grew so big! I hacked it back as far as I could without jackhammering up the slab, and kept it at bay with a sock full of copper sulfate crystals. Yeah, one of these days, I'm going to have to gut that bathroom and hammer up the slab to get it out. Or just use a match to fix the whole place.


    Yikes. What a mess. I didn't even think of it getting into plumbing. I'm just trying to save the terrazzo. But I can see where that could turn into a very expensive problem.

    My other issue however is that I would hate for cutting this to damage the tree. I suppose it must have other roots too so I guess I can cut but then I don't see where I have a choice. I'm not certain but I think it comes from a neighbors live oak and maybe I should show them my problem before I do anything? I sent pics to my engineer brother and he says definitely I have to cut that.


    Pruning one root won't hurt a tree. Depending on the person involved, bringing in the neighbor could just cause bad craziness. If you go with chemical warfare, don't use a systemic herbicide - that would go back up the root and kill the whole tree. If you have trees near the house, it's kind of hard to keep roots out of the foundation drains, unless you spike them with something like copper sulfate once in a while. That won't hurt the rest of the tree.
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    Jan 25, 2013 12:07 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidPruning one root won't hurt a tree. Depending on the person involved, bringing in the neighbor could just cause bad craziness. If you go with chemical warfare, don't use a systemic herbicide - that would go back up the root and kill the whole tree. If you have trees near the house, it's kind of hard to keep roots out of the foundation drains, unless you spike them with something like copper sulfate once in a while. That won't hurt the rest of the tree.


    I've planted a crap load of stuff and when I come across a root an inch or more I try to plant around it instead of cutting so it hurts me to cut this one but I can't let it hurt the house so I gotta saw snip that.

    I like to be as upfront as I can but I see your point with the neighbor. I think she'd be okay and in fact she'd probably be more concerned with her tree damaging my house but maybe as you say best to not say.

    No way will I use chemicals. It's a nice tree. I hope to not damage it. I'll dig that side of my house and see if I can't get it back at least three or five feet from the foundation and then reinspect every 10 years & recut as required.

    We don't have foundation drainage issues in most if not all of Florida as the soil here generally is sandy and drains readily. My last house was built on an old dune and wouldn't even flood in a hurricane with all the water those things drop. Here I'm at a higher elevation with very deep sand. Though this property slopes slightly, so I get some water in a big rain at the lower end but within 10 minutes of even our major Florida downpours it drains dry. The bamboo is very happy to be growing here.
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    Jan 25, 2013 7:52 PM GMT
    Zombie roots attacking your house?

    Chain saw

    Problem solved.
    IMG_2798_1_zps1f4a16f2.jpg

    Big damned thing. 6 inches across
    IMG_2801_1_zps6faa5c83.jpg.
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    Jan 31, 2013 4:32 PM GMT
    Pressure cleaning area where root was growing exposed this damage...
    IMG_2817_1_zpsca5b4a18.jpg
    Fucking thing put a root right into a concrete block and cracked it. Had this been left to grow for another 10 years it could have done some major damage.