Moving Forward: Judy Shepard speaks after 15 years of Matthew Shepard's Death

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 23, 2013 9:17 AM GMT
    Today, I was at the gym when Katie Couric had Judy Shepard on her show, it was so inspirational to listen to her courage and strength to overcome the horrific death that her son endured. It has been 15 years since his death, and it brought me to tears, and how his death has not been in vain by her efforts. There is still so much homophobia and hate that we have to endure and overcome, but her foundation has helped move things forward. Just wanted to share with the RJ community.

    [url][/url]
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jan 23, 2013 9:36 AM GMT
    I would have enjoyed hearing it all! In the 14 years since his passing, much progress has been made... and much remains. I'll have to look for the program and see if I can watch a bit of it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 23, 2013 3:08 PM GMT
    I saw the program. The town sherrif who led the investigation is a former homophobe who now is a gay ally.

    The producer of The Laramie Project (who was there in the audience) mentioned that some folks in Laramie are now beginning to think the death was not a hate crime, but the result of a robbery gone wrong.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 23, 2013 3:22 PM GMT
    She is greatly admired by me and what she stands for. Her son is in a place where he is happy and proud of what his family is doing in his name.
  • Sportsfan1

    Posts: 479

    Jan 23, 2013 4:33 PM GMT
    May she continue her brave fight in the name of her late son. He is in a better place happy that his mother is working to make the world a better place for all of us.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Jan 23, 2013 5:42 PM GMT
    We have had an annual Matthew Shepard sermon at Trinity Episcopal, Seattle since the first year. Much good has come from it, and the sermon provided us a first basis for becoming Open and Affirming, and later, a platform for recognition of same-sex marriage. A good monument to Matthew, I think.
  • Arab_in_NL

    Posts: 100

    Jan 23, 2013 8:40 PM GMT
    Sent to me two years ago by Tim, my more than 10 years online-friend in USA.

    ix79zb.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 23, 2013 9:00 PM GMT
    I was Matthew's age when it happened, just coming into my own sexuality. I grew up in a very small town as well, I remember being at my aunt's house and my big Polish family was talking about it.
    This was THE event that changed the way this country views homosexuality, if you just look at the trends since then. I remember the attitudes in my own family changing because of it, and the remorse they were feeling.
    I think Matthew existed as a sacrifice for the rest of us.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 23, 2013 10:01 PM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidI would have enjoyed hearing it all! In the 14 years since his passing, much progress has been made... and much remains. I'll have to look for the program and see if I can watch a bit of it.


    If you go to Katie's website it is posted there.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 23, 2013 10:32 PM GMT
    Englishness saidSent to me two years ago by Tim, my more than 10 years online-friend in USA.

    ix79zb.jpg


    I vacationed with my grandmother to visit my uncle in Wyomming when around the time this happened. I was 12 or 13 at the time and of course like most teenagers my hormones just started to kick into over drive and I was realizing I was gay.

    I spent 3 months with my grandmother at my uncles and saw first hand the bigotry and hate in the state during this time. I will never forget the awful things my uncle and his white trash hillbilie friends said about the case. My grandmother (not knowing I was gay) stood up against them which earned her my upmost respect until she died.

    I was scared kid back then terrified of my uncle and his friends thinking to myself if they knew I was gay they would do the same thing to me. I could not wait to get back home to Illinois where sane and tolerant people actually existed. It was one of the scariest experiences of my life. Some wonder why so late in life I choose to come out but I think it is because of that overwhelming fear I had during that crucial part of my life that made me feel that I would have to take this secret to the grave. I think I hid for a week in the room I was staying at my uncles lying to my grams saying I was sick. After I heard the news of Matthew Shepard I could not stop crying thinking if anyone ever found out I was gay I would face the same hate.

    It is scary all these years later that even after this Wyoming has barely changed its laws against gay hate crimes. I will NEVER go back to Wyomming ever again. Luckily my family has NOTHING to do with that crazy white trash uncle since after my grams died.

    R.I.P Matthew Shepard. icon_cry.gif
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Jan 24, 2013 1:06 AM GMT
    When I opened the thread I thought, This is going to be bad. Now I'm in tears, but crying over how far we've come. A President promotes gay rights in his inaug innaugg. ok fuck it, that speach thing. Seriously. Look around you. How much better is your life now? He died but it shocked people into accepting a new reality, much like the Newtown thing will hopefully make Yankees not need a gun in a holster when they go shopping.
  • turtleneckjoc...

    Posts: 4685

    Jan 24, 2013 1:24 AM GMT
    Englishness saidSent to me two years ago by Tim, my more than 10 years online-friend in USA.

    ix79zb.jpg


    I read this a couple of years ago and it was heart-wrenching. Even though it's a sad story and his killers did not receive the death penalty, I encourage all RJers to read this---and take action against hatred.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 24, 2013 1:57 PM GMT
    I happened to see the katie couric show when she was on. Glad she is still telling the story of her son's murder.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 25, 2013 10:56 AM GMT
    Yesterday on a lazy Sunday, my partner and I watched a film about Matthew Shepard's life, and unfortunately his death. We struggled to understand how a life so young could be ended in such a heinous manner, and we appreciated our lives a lot more when the film ended.

    As members of the LGBT community in Ireland, we are fortunate to be protected in many ways by legislation, we are still fighting for marriage equality but this too will come.

    I hope that life has improved in America for LGBT communities in the past 15 years since Matthew's death. It is a country that has provided me with some inspirational people through the years, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Harvey Milk, The Stonewall Movement, to name but a few.

    I would add Matthew's parents to this list after watching this interview, and seeing that 15 years on they still are campaigning for race crime legislation.

    I wanted to post also to remember Matthew, his death should not be forgotten.