Paul Newman Dead!

  • Aquanerd

    Posts: 845

    Sep 27, 2008 3:36 PM GMT
    icon_sad.gificon_cry.gificon_sad.gificon_cry.gif

    Wow!
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    Sep 27, 2008 4:20 PM GMT
    What form of cancer was it?
  • jc_online

    Posts: 487

    Sep 27, 2008 4:24 PM GMT
    Paul Newman Dead At 83Actor, renowned for roles in 'The Hustler,' 'Cool Hand Luke,' 'Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,' 'The Sting' and 'The Verdict' and others, died Friday of cancer.
    By Shawn Adler

    Oscar-winning actor and noted philanthropist Paul Newman died Friday at his home in Westport, Connecticut, of cancer, a spokesperson told CNN. The actor was renowned not only for his work in such films as "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof," "Exodus," "The Hustler," "Cool Hand Luke," "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," "The Sting" and "The Verdict," but also for his many years of charity work.

    Born January 26, 1925, in Shaker Heights, Ohio, Newman's acting career began auspiciously, with a small role in the Pulitzer Prize winning Broadway play "Picnic." But it wasn't until he moved to Hollywood in the mid-1950s that he really began rocketing to fame, with roles in films like "The Silver Chalice," "Somebody Up There Likes Me," and, especially, "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" (195icon_cool.gif where he played Brick Pollitt, the ambiguously homosexual son of a southern patriarch. For his performance in the film, Newman would receive the first of what would become 10 Academy Award nominations.

    Many famous film roles would follow throughout the next decade, most notably in classics like "Hud," "Sweet Bird of Youth," "Cool Hand Luke," and "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," the latter of which co-starred Robert Redford. The pair would re-team once again five years later for "The Sting," a ragtime ode to two con men that would go on to win Best Picture at the Academy Awards. The two films were among the highest-grossing of the era.

    Newman himself would finally get his long overdue Oscar in 1986, as Best Actor for his portrayal of "Fast" Eddie Felson in "The Color of Money" (1986). Co-starring Tom Cruise, the Martin Scorcese-directed flick was a direct sequel to possibly Newman's best early film, "The Hustler," picking up 20 years later in the life of cinema's most famous pool shark.

    Newman would go on to earn two more Oscar nominations for continued, if sporadic, work over the next two decades, one for "Nobody's Fool" in 1994 and his last for "Road to Perdition" in 2002, the veteran actor's last actual appearance on the big-screen. Newman's final role, however, was as the voice of Doc Hudson in the animated "Cars." It is unknown at press time how his death affects the role in "Cars 2."

    Other notable acting roles included performances in films like "Absence of Malice," "Slap Shot," "The Verdict," and "The Towering Inferno."

    While Newman gained worldwide acclaim for his acting, he would become equally well known in later years for his philanthropy, most notably through Newman's Own, a food company that produced salad dressing, popcorn, lemonade, and cookies, among other products. Newman donated all of the company's after taxes profits to charity, which, at the time of his death, amounted to more than $200 million over 15 years.

    Newman was particularly avid in his support of Hole in the Wall Gang Camp, which he founded with author A.E. Hotchner in 1988. In associated with other camps in the United States and abroad, it provides camping experiences free-of-charge for children suffering from cancer and other serious illnesses and helps to support their families.

    For his contributions to charity, Newman won the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award at the 1994 Oscars.

    Newman is survived by his wife of 50 years, actress Joanne Woodward, and five children.


  • MuslDrew

    Posts: 463

    Sep 27, 2008 6:38 PM GMT
    He was one of my all time favorite actors, both for his early classics and his more recent appearances. He & his wife were together for a very long time, not often found in celebrity marriages. And they provided so much for society through their foundation. He's an admirable man.
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    Sep 27, 2008 7:09 PM GMT
    Caslon7000 saidWhat form of cancer was it?

    Lung
    icon_cry.gif
  • Aquanerd

    Posts: 845

    Sep 27, 2008 7:24 PM GMT
    I was raised Paul Newman. My mom went to see him on Broadway in "The Sweet Bird of Youth." Every time any one brought up Paul Newman, we got a re-telling of how she was on the front row and when his character cried, he was right at the from of the stage and he was crying real tears right into her lap. She was in love from that point on. Every time a Newman movie was on TV, we were watching it.

    Since Joanne Newman grew up in Marietta, there have been a number of Paul Newman sighting stories.

    One of my favorites was from a friend of my mom's. She was at Cold Stone Creamery. She was waiting to be served, when the girl behind the counter, asked what the man beside her, what he wanted. He said the he was after her? When my mom's fiend looked up, it was Paul Newman. Even in his advanced years, she said his eyes were piercingly blue eyes. She placed her ordered. On the way to her car she realized that she'd left her cone in the shop. Going back in she said, "I left my ice cream." The girl behind the counter was smiling. Paul leaned over to her and quietly said, "It's in your purse."

    Paul Newman did, what most Hollywood types would never do. He put his money where is mouth was. Newman's Own, made millions for organizations that Newman supported. Wouldn't it be nice of the rest of the limo libs in Hollywood would follow suit.

    My favorite Newman roles were in 'Absents of Malice' and 'Mr. and Mrs. Bridge.' Amazing understated performances. You never saw Newman acting. You just enjoyed the performance in the movie, as part of the story. When you say a Newman movie, you never thought, Wow, that was a fine piece of acting. That's probably why it took so long for him to win an Oscar.
  • speedoguy53

    Posts: 124

    Sep 27, 2008 10:08 PM GMT
    Paul Newman was a huge talent and a unique hollywood figure. As an appraiser back in Ct in the early 2000's I appraised his daughter's house in Westport and the house next door to his. They were normal down to earth people. He was frequently seen about town and was as congenial as can be. And what a hottie he was in Cat On A Hot Tin Roof w/ Elizabeth Taylor so many years ago! He was truly a "Renaissance Man" with his stage acting, screen acting, his car racing and his many philanthropies....he has left his mark and I for one truly appreciate having been able to experince his ride here...........
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    Sep 27, 2008 10:28 PM GMT
    One of the good guys. RIP mate.

    I had the privilege of meeting him Once while I was staying Utah. H e was mates with the people I was staying with, another racing enthusiast, as I am too. I found him to be grounded, and truly one of the good guys. Happy too of had the privilege.
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    Sep 27, 2008 11:10 PM GMT
    Here's what I remember about Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward Newman - from one meeting when a friend of mine brokered the sale of the Newmans' house on Whittier Drive in Beverly Hills: Newman drove a Volkswagen Beetle (but the couple had other cars too) and he said he hated signing autographs for people (I didn't ask!) They commented they were moving to their main house in Westport, CT in part because "we hate manicured lawns and palm trees." I also remember he seemed quiet, private, a bit sullen, yet friendly and pleasant - unassuming. Their house was a 1940s vintage white brick, two story French colonial in near perfect condition - with manicured lawns and palm trees.
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    Sep 28, 2008 12:41 PM GMT
    If you want to know Paul Newman, last month Vanity Fair wrote a great article about him. Not the latest issue, but the September issue.

    If you never knew him, and you are young and think he was some old actor, get that issue and see the pics of him as a young actor. He was strikingly beautiful. But he fought against being cast for his good looks. He was an actor first, first in theater then in movies. He never played his good looks. He took roles that played against it. He pretty much spent his career fighting his good looks.

    His breakout role was "Hud" in which he played a dissaffected character. See him in "Cool Hand Luke" and you see one of the best single performances by an actor in a film role. Later, he was in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. He was middle aged but had no problem playing against and sharing time with a very young and very hot Robert Redford. That was one of the all time great films. If you are a fan of film, watch him and his interaction with Redford. It does not get better than that. It was the genesis of "buddy" films with two major male stars sharing screen time.

    He later did several great films, "Absence of Malice", among them. But his life changed when his son Scott committed suicide. It changed his life. He commited his life to social change. On a whim, he started a food company, Newman's Own, that became a huge success and has given over $200 million to various social causes.

    He also started and funded a camp, which became many camps, for disabled kids called Hole in the Wall, based on the hideout name of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid's hideout canyon in Utah.

    If you do not know Paul Newman, you should watch a few films.

    Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

    Somebody up There Likes Me

    Hud

    Cool Hand Luke

    Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

    Absence of Malice

    Slapshot ( one of my and Paul's personal favorites)


    I met Paul Newman one time when I was 10 years old. I was getting my haircut next door to a diner. One of the barbers had just been to the diner and had been standing next to Paul Newman as he was taking a piss and had asked for his autograph. Newman said no. I had just seen "Butch Cassidy" and I was a huge fan. I finished my haircut and ran nextdoor to the diner. Newman was sitting in a booth with about 5 people. I asked him for an autograph, and he said no. Sorry, kid. No. Some other people in the booth offered to give me an autogragh, but I did not really want them.

    Years later, I read an article about Paul Newman and he said he never gave autographs. He said someone asked him for one in a restroom, and he never gave another.

    But he was a classy guy.
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Sep 28, 2008 1:35 PM GMT
    a "man's man"!

    espically given his choice of vocation in an area of the world known for vanity, backstabbing and philandering, he stayed loyal to the same lifepartner all those years.

    anyone recall his famous quote from his playboy interview? when asked if he had ever strayed on his wife, his reply was "why go out for hamburger when i have steak at home?"

    my father shamlessly stole that quote from him and used it until the day he died, much to my mother's somewhat embarrassed delight. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Sep 28, 2008 2:30 PM GMT
    I have been rereading the article in Vanity Fair and just like the fact that he was such a well rounded person. He was a member of the famed Actor's Studio, but never felt like he measured up to the great actors that came before him, even when he became the President of the Actor's Studio in the 80's.

    And then he became one of the all time great amateur race car driver's of all time, at a very old age for race car drivers, his 30's, and won Le Man's 24 Hour Race. He had a string of wins and was said to have been an incredible race care driver.

    When I met him, which I mentioned earlier, he was on a break from filming Towering Inferno, and was racing that weekend at Sears Point International Raceway in Sonoma, now known as Infenion, in a very competitive race.

    Overall, he was just a good guy, that thought deeply about issues, was involved deeply in the Democratic party in the 70's, and did things to make money for needy people. When he could make money for poor kids, he did. When he could use his fame to help kids, he did. Just a class act.
  • Aquanerd

    Posts: 845

    Sep 30, 2008 11:46 PM GMT
    rnch saida "man's man"!

    espically given his choice of vocation in an area of the world known for vanity, backstabbing and philandering, he stayed loyal to the same lifepartner all those years.

    anyone recall his famous quote from his playboy interview? when asked if he had ever strayed on his wife, his reply was "why go out for hamburger when i have steak at home?"

    my father shamlessly stole that quote from him and used it until the day he died, much to my mother's somewhat embarrassed delight. icon_biggrin.gif


    I read a quote from Elizabeth Taylor after his death. You got the idea that she really wanted to get him in the sack, even more knowing that he didn't stray. icon_smile.gif