Daily sugar allowance - 45g :O

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    Jan 28, 2013 11:02 PM GMT
    I have heard a lot about sugar being the enemy wrt modern diets. Also my dad has diabetes so I was thinking I should keep an eye on my sugar levels. I checked a few websites and there are differences of opinion regarding how much is ok. One website said 90g but Livestrong said only 45g a day.

    This would be fine except there is sugar in so many things! Youghurt, fruit, fruit juice (especially apple juice), bread, milk. However, green vegetables, meat, pasta, rice and beans seem pretty much sugar free.

    I am going to try and stick to 45g a day for a few weeks and see how I get on. Probably most of that will go on ready made soup and milk in coffee.

    Does anyone else try and target their sugar consumption? If so, how did it work out for you?
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    Jan 28, 2013 11:13 PM GMT
    The White Russian I'm drinking now has more than 45g of sugar. icon_lol.gif
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    Jan 28, 2013 11:42 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidThe White Russian I'm drinking now has more than 45g of sugar. icon_lol.gif


    I love a black russian myself. But that is a good point, some alcoholic drinks are off the menu. Looks like a pint of bitter is ok though, that is my drink of choice icon_smile.gif
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    Jan 29, 2013 9:06 AM GMT
    bus9ja2d said
    paulflexes saidThe White Russian I'm drinking now has more than 45g of sugar. icon_lol.gif


    I love a black russian myself. But that is a good point, some alcoholic drinks are off the menu. Looks like a pint of bitter is ok though, that is my drink of choice icon_smile.gif
    I did the sugar fast for a while a couple years ago; but now I do so much cardio that I actually need the sugar for energy and recovery. Just before my previous post I'd ridden 15 minutes on the bicycle at full sprint (setting the sealant for new tubeless tires). The White Russian had just the right amount of sugar, then I went straight to sleep. icon_lol.gif
  • califun869

    Posts: 54

    Jan 29, 2013 9:13 AM GMT
    What they should be saying is stay away from refined sugar. Refined sugar is pure sugar which is almost like a poison to our body. Sugar from fruits and honey is complex sugar, which can be broken down into simple sugars called monosaccharides. Here's where I got this information-- really long but interesting read. http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/sugar-problem/refined-sugar-the-sweetest-poison-of-all
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    Jan 30, 2013 9:59 PM GMT
    I have had about 30g sugar yesterday and the same today. Most of it came from ready made soup, sausages, protein shakes and milk in coffee.

    I have found breakfast is usually the toughest meal to avoid sugar in, I have been having avocados but will probably get bored of them soon.

    I have found that I reached the point where I was finding it challenging really quickly! Normally with a diet I can last about 5 days before I start to crave things. This time it was only 1 day!
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    Jan 30, 2013 10:04 PM GMT
    bus9ja2d saidfruit juice (especially apple juice), bread, milk.


    All things you should eventually work to all but eliminate from your diet. Aim for complex, slow digesting carbs, avoid as much processed crap (i.e. food that comes in a printed receptacle encased in paper, plastic or worse yet styrofoam) as possible.
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    Jan 30, 2013 10:04 PM GMT
    bus9ja2d saidI have heard a lot about sugar being the enemy wrt modern diets. Also my dad has diabetes so I was thinking I should keep an eye on my sugar levels. I checked a few websites and there are differences of opinion regarding how much is ok. One website said 90g but Livestrong said only 45g a day.

    This would be fine except there is sugar in so many things! Youghurt, fruit, fruit juice (especially apple juice), bread, milk. However, green vegetables, meat, pasta, rice and beans seem pretty much sugar free.

    I am going to try and stick to 45g a day for a few weeks and see how I get on. Probably most of that will go on ready made soup and milk in coffee.

    Does anyone else try and target their sugar consumption? If so, how did it work out for you?


    So we're still taking fitness advice from a Lance Armstrong sponsored fitness website? icon_twisted.gif
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    Jan 30, 2013 10:06 PM GMT
    califun869 saidWhat they should be saying is stay away from refined sugar. Refined sugar is pure sugar which is almost like a poison to our body. Sugar from fruits and honey is complex sugar, which can be broken down into simple sugars called monosaccharides. Here's where I got this information-- really long but interesting read. http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/sugar-problem/refined-sugar-the-sweetest-poison-of-all


    That was an interesting link. I was interested to read about the "sugar pushers". Apparently Bill Clinton once interrupted a meeting with Monica Lewinsky to talk to a sugar baron icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jan 30, 2013 10:07 PM GMT
    redsoxfan791 said

    So we're still taking fitness advice from a Lance Armstrong sponsored fitness website? icon_twisted.gif


    I haven't got to the part where he tells me to replace sugar with drugs yet icon_biggrin.gif
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Jan 30, 2013 10:10 PM GMT
    Does your dad have type 1 or type 2 diabetes?
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    Jan 30, 2013 10:12 PM GMT
    Medjai saidDoes your dad have type 1 or type 2 diabetes?


    Type 2
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    Jan 30, 2013 10:22 PM GMT
    bus9ja2d said
    califun869 saidWhat they should be saying is stay away from refined sugar. Refined sugar is pure sugar which is almost like a poison to our body. Sugar from fruits and honey is complex sugar, which can be broken down into simple sugars called monosaccharides. Here's where I got this information-- really long but interesting read. http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/sugar-problem/refined-sugar-the-sweetest-poison-of-all


    That was an interesting link. I was interested to read about the "sugar pushers". Apparently Bill Clinton once interrupted a meeting with Monica Lewinsky to talk to a sugar baron icon_biggrin.gif


    Yeah... that's why you shouldn't get your information from internet babble icon_rolleyes.gif

    Just don't buy stuff with added sugar. Learn the names of the sugars and look for them on labels. They aren't "good" or "evil." It's just a fact that if you add sugar to stuff, the masses will buy more of it. Once you loose your sweet tooth, and it doesn't take all that long, one bite into a sweetened product will make you want to spit it out


    BTW: One summer, long ago, part of my job was dumping the extra sugar (sucrose) into yogurt filling. I dumped a whole 50 lb bag into every barrel (which was already 20% sugar (fructose) from the fruit.) As far as I could tell, the resulting yogurt was completely inedible.
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    Jan 30, 2013 10:25 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidOnce you loose your sweet tooth, and it doesn't take all that long, one bite into a sweetened product will make you want to spit it out


    That's where I want to be icon_biggrin.gif
  • invisigay10

    Posts: 35

    Jan 30, 2013 10:49 PM GMT
    The onset of Type 2 Diabetes is actually not directly related to sugar intake. The main causative factor is obesity. Of course, high intake of sugar makes it more likely to become obese.. The onset of Type 1 diabetes is not related to diet.

    Also, honey is mostly fructose and glucose and from a health perspective is not meaningfully superior to refined sugar, nor is maple-syrup etc.

    Paul is right in saying that endurance athletes need a larger amount of simple sugars. Though they can be partially replaced by polysaccharides like maltodextrin (and are in many sports-drinks).
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Jan 30, 2013 10:50 PM GMT
    With type 2 diabetes in the family, you may want to head for the American Diabetes Association site for prevention measures.

    As a type 2 diabetic my recommended carb allowance is 60 grams per each of three evenly spaced meals per day. As my doctor says, "Carbs is carbs." so it is not just sugars that you should watch.

    Narciso is right about avoiding the simple carbs. I very, very rarely eat white bread any more. It just doesn't taste good. You soon get used to the extra flavors and textures that whole fruits and veggies provide and the simple sweets just are not as attractive.

    Of course, exercise is a great way to keep the metabolism in Happy Land. Enjoy.
  • SomeSiciliano...

    Posts: 543

    Jan 30, 2013 11:13 PM GMT
    bus9ja2d saidI have had about 30g sugar yesterday and the same today. Most of it came from ready made soup, sausages, protein shakes and milk in coffee.

    I have found breakfast is usually the toughest meal to avoid sugar in, I have been having avocados but will probably get bored of them soon.

    I have found that I reached the point where I was finding it challenging really quickly! Normally with a diet I can last about 5 days before I start to crave things. This time it was only 1 day!


    I've never really liked any traditional breakfast food anyway. I loathe eggs...sausage & bacon. Cereal never did it for me and pancakes/waffles put me in a coma. Therefore my breakfast is a few strips of chicken breast I keep handy with quinoa/brown rice and avocado or pineapple with cinnamon. I premake chicken rice and quinoa.....it keeps in the fridge for several days.
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    Jan 30, 2013 11:32 PM GMT
    bus9ja2d said
    redsoxfan791 said

    So we're still taking fitness advice from a Lance Armstrong sponsored fitness website? icon_twisted.gif


    I haven't got to the part where he tells me to replace sugar with drugs yet icon_biggrin.gif
    Before a hard ride, I like to replace sugar with honey...mixed with homemade green tea and ginseng. That actually does better than a 5-hour energy shot; but still isn't as effective as the stuff Lance Armweak was on.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Jan 30, 2013 11:35 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    bus9ja2d said
    redsoxfan791 said

    So we're still taking fitness advice from a Lance Armstrong sponsored fitness website? icon_twisted.gif


    I haven't got to the part where he tells me to replace sugar with drugs yet icon_biggrin.gif
    Before a hard ride, I like to replace sugar with honey...mixed with homemade green tea and ginseng. That actually does better than a 5-hour energy shot; but still isn't as effective as the stuff Lance Armweak was on.
    l
    You mean EPO? It just gave him more blood is all.
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    Jan 30, 2013 11:42 PM GMT
    Medjai said
    paulflexes said
    bus9ja2d said
    redsoxfan791 said

    So we're still taking fitness advice from a Lance Armstrong sponsored fitness website? icon_twisted.gif


    I haven't got to the part where he tells me to replace sugar with drugs yet icon_biggrin.gif
    Before a hard ride, I like to replace sugar with honey...mixed with homemade green tea and ginseng. That actually does better than a 5-hour energy shot; but still isn't as effective as the stuff Lance Armweak was on.
    l
    You mean EPO? It just gave him more blood is all.


    He admitted to HGH and testosterone on Oprah. Go Youtube it. Testosterone lets you recover faster.

    To the OP: added sugars are bad. Stop trying to eliminate all sugar in your diet. Carbohydrates should still be 45-65% of your calorie intake, from fruits, veggies/legumes, whole grains, etc. There is a DRI on carbohydrate of 130g/day minimum because your blood cells lack mitochondria and have to use glycolysis, which requires carbohydrate. Your brain, nervous sys, lens of eye, and nephron of kidney also function on carbohydrate. Muscles can use carbs primarily and fats secondarily and more fat and protein if carbohydrate is low.
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    Jan 31, 2013 6:32 PM GMT
    bluey, did you ever read Volek & Phinney? They say a keto-adapted person can function perfectly well on a diet with a bare minimum of carbohydrate. According to them, at least, most studies that prove carbohydrate "need" either (1) didn't restrict carbohydrate intake sufficiently to induce dietary ketosis, or (2) didn't last long enough for the subjects to finish the process of keto adaptation, which can take 4 weeks or longer.

    Anyway, back to the OP's question, I'm functioning perfectly well on 30-45 g of net carbs per day (not just sugars, all carbs other than fiber). It took a while to adapt but it's going fine now.

    Full disclosure, I'm only doing it in an effort to fix some blood lipid issues - otherwise I wouldn't do it. If it doesn't address the lipid issues ultimately, I'll be back to some carbs. I don't mind the diet, but it can be difficult.



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    Feb 10, 2013 4:59 PM GMT
    No, I haven't read that. But you're going to lose a lot of lean mass on your diet. Feel like shit, have no energy, and perhaps feel euphoric and have many epiphanies.

    I haven't read the DRI evidence for 130g of Carbs a day, so until then, we'll see how you do.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Feb 10, 2013 5:07 PM GMT
    bluey2223 saidNo, I haven't read that. But you're going to lose a lot of lean mass on your diet. Feel like shit, have no energy, and perhaps feel euphoric and have many epiphanies.

    I haven't read the DRI evidence for 130g of Carbs a day, so until then, we'll see how you do.


    I'm going to have to agree. Using a backup, emergency pathway to support systemic function seems like a whole lot of unnecessary stress on the body. It might work, but can't be good in the long run. We simply weren't designed for it.
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    Feb 11, 2013 9:45 PM GMT
    So I have been following this diet for 2 weeks now. I have not been limiting my carbs, only sugars from all sources, sorry for not clearing that up. I have been having a bagel with peanut butter in the morning, a sandwich for lunch about half the time and also having porridge a few times.

    Been having lots of salad, avocados, fish and meat. I think the main problem with the diet has been that I have been having a bit more salt than I am used to from a few things. My main source of sugars has been milk, followed by protein shakes and the bagel (might swap that for porridge every day).

    It was quite hard to avoid sugar to start with, but it got easier and even when 2 different coworkers brought in cupcakes, I didn't have any. I just sniffed them like Karl Lagerfeld does icon_lol.gif

    I will weigh myself this week to find out how much weight I lost, but I know I lost 2in from my waist over the 2 weeks icon_biggrin.gif

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    Feb 12, 2013 1:46 PM GMT
    My daily allowance of sugar is essentially zero.

    My body is highly endomorphic and is consequently very carbohydrate sensitive (insulin-dominant). My body will respond with an insulin reaction much more easily than a normal person. It sucks for losing weight, but it's awesome for bodybuilding.

    That said, I eliminated refined sugars fairly easily. No table sugar, no corn syrup in drinks, no candy, no desserts. Pretty easy. My go-to foods were always savory anyway. And I think that once I actually started reading labels and realizing where sugars were in the modern diet, it was not that hard to eliminate them. I'm not such a fan of fruit juice or fruit in general that it was hard to cut those out... not when I had all kinds of savory things to replace it with. The hard thing was when I eventually restricted all starches. You'd be surprised where carbohydrates are lurking in the supermarket (why, Peanut Butter, do you have to be made with cane syrup!?).

    These days I follow a somewhat complicated carb-cycling diet (which you'll find at the link above, I believe) and most days my carb intake is no more than 30 grams total: usually less than 10% of my total calorie consumption.