a rant: on southern racism

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    Oct 02, 2008 5:54 AM GMT

    ok so I apologize in advance for doing this, but I'm in a new city, no new friends, and desperately need to get this off my chest.


    what the fuck's up with all the racist assholes in Georgia (and the south in general). You lost the war, get over it!! I'm half Brasilian, half Russian, a mix most people are not familiar with. and SO many times I've been asked what ethnicity I am, as if that somehow defines me. At Emory U., where im in medical school, walking down the hallway once someone asked me to take out the trash in their office. WTF?!?!?! I have to continuously justify my being there, even though im ranked 3 in my class. And that's just one of MANY examples of racism I've personally experienced, including the idiot soccer mom to TOLD me to pump her gas, because she thought I worked at the gas station.

    My exotic looks were an asset in modeling (which i used to do to pay for college) and back home in Miami. Here in redneck country they're a liability.

    I'm sick of it. And I dont know how to deal with it. My friends from back home tell me I should just get used to it, but I dont know that it's something ANYONE should get used to. Any advice?
  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    Oct 02, 2008 6:49 AM GMT
    Sorry to hear about your experiences man, can't be easy. Move to Los Angeles or another major metropolis with a lot of ethnic diversity. You might still be questioned about your origins, but it comes from a different perspective. I enjoy being surrounded by an endless stream of cultural diversity. I would not want to live in a white washed world.
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    Oct 02, 2008 7:06 AM GMT
    I used to live there near emory just north of Decatur. I would be surprised you would have problems because the area is pretty racially diverse (dekalb county) for the south. If people ask about the way you look, it could just be curiosity, but I don't know about the gas station thing .. I thought everyone pumped their own gas now .. that sounds a little snooty to me.

    I would say if people ask about your background, just let them know because maybe they are just curious .. Also don't let it get to you. The best way to show you are not below someone is to rise above the situation and carry yourself with poise and dignity. Put it back on others to get mad if they think you should be beneath them while you rise above it and don't let people get to you.
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    Oct 02, 2008 12:05 PM GMT
    Hey, I can completely empathise with you. I've experienced that too lately, in the past year and 10 months I've been here in a new country and town- verbal abuse, nasty looks, sometimes made to feel like a leper . I was in the South too (TX) many years ago at a private uni, and I guess it's obvious what ethnicity I am, and I remember getting stopped by campus police a few times and having my ID checked in broad daylight as I was making my way across campus.

    Yes you'll feel angry, frustrated, stressed etc, but there isn't much you can do apart from moving elsewhere if you can...that's how society and mentalities are in some places. Maybe things will change with time..a very long time.
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    Oct 02, 2008 12:31 PM GMT
    I hate to break it to you, but there are assholes and racists everywhere. Adding the "southern" part to your rant lowers you to their level. I always found it sort of interesting that's one of the "last acceptable" stereotypes, that people from the South are "like that."

    Five and a half million people in Atlanta, and I would venture it's one of the more diverse cities in the nation, if not just by dint of its size.

    End of snarkiness.

    Anyway, I am genuinely sorry that you had to deal with that.

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    Oct 02, 2008 2:21 PM GMT
    Yeah? I’m a little over southerners being labeled “RACIST”!
    While the rest of the country and the world, so laughably, must be full of people so pure.

    I grew up in the south and have since lived in many other parts of the country and now back in the south... Racism in the south is no more prevalent than it is in any other state or country.

    Some might ask your ethnicity out of simple curiosity, but if you always assume there is an underlying meaning, then perhaps your expectations are that everyone has a racist intent. The "South" as you so eloquently put it has always been the easy target and now it's more an over used and tired stereotype.

    I have also known and been very close friends with people who cover a rather full spectrum of religious beliefs, ethnic backgrounds, and environmental influences (such a region of a country where born or culture) and have yet to meet any one free of some level of racism.

    And trust me, the south got over the civil war long ago, be nice if every one else could.

    I respect your frustrations and even understand where you are coming from.
    The woman, who expected anyone to pump her gas, must have been elderly or asleep for 35 years since no gas station has done that in this region since around 1977 and perhaps she asked because she simply need help (and how do you know whe was a "soccer mom" - or is that just a sterotype/snide/derogatory label?).
    By the way, this individual that asked you to take the trash out, you had a conversation with them and therefore that is how you know that they were born and raised in the south. When I was in College, 65% of the student body was from up north and many stayed after graduation (and I attended a college in SC), not mention half of Florida is New York retirees.

    So these "southern racists" you refer to maybe a misguided label in itself.

    How to deal, you might ask yourself how you carry yourself, it certainly doesn’t excuse ass-hole behavior; however, it’s a fact and always has been... People are first judged on appearance – I had a cop when I was younger treat me like I thought I was some rich-shit because when he pulled me over in my car, he assumed the car (I paid for) was daddy’s and the suit I was in was proof of my snobby-wealth. When, in fact, I was barely middle-class, lived in the burbs, and was paying for that car myself with a job working in a warehouse and the suit I had on was because I had just left a wedding. Dress like a thug and you’re treated like a thug...
    As an adult and business man, when young men show up to interviews with their pants down around their ass cheeks it raises a quick question of respect and professionalism – I get it, it “the style”, but its your style not necessarily the job/place you are hoping to “fit in” to.
    May suck, but it is what it is... you learn to deal.
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    Oct 02, 2008 2:42 PM GMT
    Racism is nearly everywhere in America.

    In the south, it's "hate the group, love the individual". They vote as racists, but treat each other as friends.

    In the north, it's "love the group, hate the individual". They vote for diversity, but don't treat each other with much respect.

    Broad broad brushes being used here, but there's definitely a distinct pattern.

    Your results west of the Mississippi may vary.
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    Oct 02, 2008 2:45 PM GMT
    collegeswimmr said
    ok so I apologize in advance for doing this, but I'm in a new city, no new friends, and desperately need to get this off my chest.


    what the fuck's up with all the racist assholes in Georgia (and the south in general). You lost the war, get over it!! I'm half Brasilian, half Russian, a mix most people are not familiar with. and SO many times I've been asked what ethnicity I am, as if that somehow defines me. At Emory U., where im in medical school, walking down the hallway once someone asked me to take out the trash in their office. WTF?!?!?! I have to continuously justify my being there, even though im ranked 3 in my class. And that's just one of MANY examples of racism I've personally experienced, including the idiot soccer mom to TOLD me to pump her gas, because she thought I worked at the gas station.

    My exotic looks were an asset in modeling (which i used to do to pay for college) and back home in Miami. Here in redneck country they're a liability.

    I'm sick of it. And I dont know how to deal with it. My friends from back home tell me I should just get used to it, but I dont know that it's something ANYONE should get used to. Any advice?


    I can see how an ignorant person might confuse you with a Middle Easterner. In the American South, apparently all Middle Easterners are muslim terrorists.
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    Oct 02, 2008 3:12 PM GMT
    ... wow and my experiences in the southern states have always been positive. But race is a big issue in our country... deal with it.
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    Oct 02, 2008 4:05 PM GMT
    The US Army stationed me in several Southern states at various times during my career, for a total of 13 years below the Mason-Dixon line. I was raised outside NYC, the son of wealthy white parents who were Republicans, even holding political office, but so liberal in their racial relationships that I was blind to the racial tensions of my era.

    In our world blacks & ethnic minorities were my equal (hell, in prep school in 1963 one black classmate's parents were a doctor and an attorney, listed in "Who's Who" and I assumed at least as prominent as my own parents. Though I do admit this was a new thing then, and some of my white classmates did have trouble with it). Then I was exposed to the Deep South, and learned a different reality.

    I'd actually be addressed as "Massah" by blacks, but what distressed me more was the fear in their eyes, when they dared even make eye contact with me. I had never experienced fearful deference before, and I didn't like the feeling.

    I was an Army Officer for much of this time in the South, and so I moved through life exercising a great deal of military authority over many people (not to mention the lessons of my pampered & privileged childhood). But never did I think, I truly hope, even when dealing with the most junior Private, that I was a fundamentally superior person to him or her, inherently entitled to my position rather than having earned it for a practical military purpose.

    I'd once been a Private myself, and I'd experienced the Officers who didn't understand that distinction, thinking they held some kind of God-given aristocratic authority. I would not make that mistake myself.

    And so when I found myself being addressed and treated in groveling ways by Southern blacks, that even a pompous General would not demand of a Private soldier, I was sickened. A single example is illustrative of another aspect of the racial divide in the South, but only one of many I experienced.

    In 1981 as an Army Captain in Alabama, I had just started to date a woman aged 33 who lived in the same off-post apartment complex that I did (I was still in deep denial). We decided to go to Atlanta, Georgia, for the day, some 90 miles away.

    We were having cocktails high up in the atrium of the "Peachtree" something or other, I think it was called; stores, offices, a hotel and other mall features. And suddenly she became alarmed.

    "Look at that!" she exclaimed. "Isn't that awful?"

    "Where?" I asked, and she pointed to some garden terraces below us, where tables and chairs were set. "I don't see what you mean."

    "Right there! See? Isn't that a disgrace?" she pointed out.

    And then my eyes saw a black man and white woman sitting together over coffee, I think it was, some 2 levels below us, both dressed in business attire. I'm sure my eyes had already passed over them already as we surveyed the view, nothing about them having attracted my attention. But now my date was having a fit over it.

    "Well, perhaps they work in an office together here, just discussing business."

    "It doesn't matter! That sort of thing shouldn't be allowed!"

    I was too stunned to reply, but I was already forming a very negative opinion of this lady.

    Afterwards we went down to the main level, just at the moment the doors to a movie theatre happened to open at the end of a showing. Suddenly I felt her squeezing my arm like a vice grip, and she whispered to me, trembling in fear:

    "Protect me! Get me out of here quickly!"

    I was puzzled at first, until I realized that whatever movie had been playing, had a largely black audience, and we were in the middle of a stream of black people leaving the theatre all at once.

    I steered us to a quiet area away from the crowd, thinking to myself: "Does she really believe black men are going to abduct & rape her in broad daylight in the middle of the Peachtree Center?"

    She apologized for her panic, explaining she had always been taught that white women should be afraid of black men. Far from fear, this was outright panic. I think she invited me onto another date with some of her friends a week or so later, and then I broke it off.

    I have similar stories, but all with the same message. Southern whites may think blacks have equality and are judged fairly, but let them become black for a few days and their eyes might be opened.
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    Oct 02, 2008 4:10 PM GMT
    Red_Vespa saidThe US Army stationed me in several Southern states at various times during my career, for a total of 13 years below the Mason-Dixon line. I was raised outside NYC, the son of wealthy white parents who were Republicans, even holding political office, but so liberal in their racial relationships that I was blind to the racial tensions of my era.

    In our world blacks & ethnic minorities were my equal (hell, in prep school in 1963 one black classmate's parents were a doctor and an attorney, listed in "Who's Who" and I assumed at least as prominent as my own parents. Though I do admit this was a new thing then, and some of my white classmates did have trouble with it). Then I was exposed to the Deep South, and learned a different reality.

    I'd actually be addressed as "Massah" by blacks, but what distressed me more was the fear in their eyes, when they dared even make eye contact with me. I had never experienced fearful deference before, and I didn't like the feeling.

    I was an Army Officer for much of this time in the South, and so I moved through life exercising a great deal of military authority over many people (not to mention the lessons of my pampered & privileged childhood). But never did I think, I truly hope, even when dealing with the most junior Private, that I was a fundamentally superior person to him or her, inherently entitled to my position rather than having earned it for a practical military purpose.

    I'd once been a Private myself, and I'd experienced the Officers who didn't understand that distinction, thinking they held some kind of God-given aristocratic authority. I would not make that mistake myself.

    And so when I found myself being addressed and treated in groveling ways by Southern blacks, that even a pompous General would not demand of a Private soldier, I was sickened. A single example is illustrative of another aspect of the racial divide in the South, but only one of many I experienced.

    In 1981 as an Army Captain in Alabama, I had just started to date a woman aged 33 who lived in the same off-post apartment complex that I did (I was still in deep denial). We decided to go to Atlanta, Georgia, for the day, some 90 miles away.

    We were having cocktails high up in the atrium of the "Peachtree" something or other, I think it was called; stores, offices, a hotel and other mall features. And suddenly she became alarmed.

    "Look at that!" she exclaimed. "Isn't that awful?"

    "Where?" I asked, and she pointed to some garden terraces below us, where tables and chairs were set. "I don't see what you mean."

    "Right there! See? Isn't that a disgrace?" she pointed out.

    And then my eye saw a black man and white woman sitting together over coffee, I think it was, some 2 levels below us, both dressed in business attire. I'm sure my eyes had already passed over them already as we surveyed the view, nothing about them having attracted my attention. But now my date was having a fit over it.

    "Well, perhaps they work in an office together here, just discussing business."

    "It doesn't matter! That sort of thing shouldn't be allowed!"

    I was too stunned to reply, but I was already forming a very negative opinion of this lady.

    Afterwards we went down to the main level, just at the moment the doors to a movie theatre happened to open at the end of a showing. Suddenly I felt her squeezing my arm like a vice grip, and she whispered to me, trembling in fear:

    "Protect me! Get me out of here quickly!"

    I was puzzled at first, until I realized that whatever movie had been playing, had a largely black audience, and we were in the middle of a stream of black people leaving the theatre all at once.

    I steered us to a quiet area away from the crowd, thinking to myself: "Does she really believe black men are going to abduct & rape her in broad daylight in the middle of the Peachtree Center?"

    She apologized for her panic, explaining she had always been taught that white women should be afraid of black men. Far from fear, this was outright panic. I think she invited me onto another date with some of her friends a week or so later, and then I broke it off.

    I have similar stories, but all with the same message. Southern whites may think blacks have equality and are judged fairly, but let them become black for a few days and their eyes might be opened.



    ...please continue to read Chapters 16-96 by Tuesday and yes there will be an exam. Have a good wkend class! icon_eek.gif
  • D972

    Posts: 125

    Oct 02, 2008 4:22 PM GMT
    Red_Vespa saidThe US Army stationed me in several Southern states at various times during my career, for a total of 13 years below the Mason-Dixon line. I was raised outside NYC, the son of wealthy white parents who were Republicans, even holding political office, but so liberal in their racial relationships that I was blind to the racial tensions of my era.

    ... [Snipped for bandwidth] ...

    I have similar stories, but all with the same message. Southern whites may think blacks have equality and are judged fairly, but let them become black for a few days and their eyes might be opened.


    Thanks so much for sharing this Red. I gagged quite a few times reading it (Im eating my sweet potatoe and tuna snack icon_rolleyes.gif freaking diet), but it was very interesting. ;) Great day to you.
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    Oct 02, 2008 4:31 PM GMT
    D972 said
    Thanks so much for sharing this Red. I gagged quite a few times reading it (Im eating my sweet potatoe and tuna snack icon_rolleyes.gif freaking diet), but it was very interesting. ;) Great day to you.


    Thanks, it was meant to make you gag, as it did me at the time. And regrettably I have lots of other stories along the same line.
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    Oct 02, 2008 4:34 PM GMT
    BodyWork4 said
    ...please continue to read Chapters 16-96 by Tuesday and yes there will be an exam. Have a good wkend class! icon_eek.gif


    LOL!!! OK, point taken. I just wish RJ had a place where I could upload files like this, rather than clogging the thread (though you didn't have to quote the whole damn thing -- LOL!). But it was something I wanted to say. My apologies.
  • D972

    Posts: 125

    Oct 02, 2008 4:37 PM GMT
    Red_Vespa said
    BodyWork4 said
    ...please continue to read Chapters 16-96 by Tuesday and yes there will be an exam. Have a good wkend class! icon_eek.gif


    LOL!!! OK, point taken. I just wish RJ had a place where I could upload files like this, rather than clogging the thread (though you don't have to quote the whole damn thing -- LOL!). But it was something I wanted to say. My apologies.


    Don't apologize, keep contributing. You bring a lot to these forums... where as others just bring a body shot.
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    Oct 02, 2008 4:43 PM GMT
    D972 said
    Don't apologize, keep contributing. You bring a lot to these forums... where as others just bring a body shot.


    Well you're very kind, and thank you. But wordiness has its drawbacks, no matter how informative.

    I also value, and try to post myself, the occasional "bon mot" that says in 6 words or less all you need to know. I gotta work on that. icon_redface.gif
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    Oct 02, 2008 6:00 PM GMT
    BodyWork4 saidYeah? I’m a little over southerners being labeled “RACIST”!
    While the rest of the country and the world, so laughably, must be full of people so pure.

    I grew up in the south and have since lived in many other parts of the country and now back in the south... Racism in the south is no more prevalent than it is in any other state or country.

    Some might ask your ethnicity out of simple curiosity, but if you always assume there is an underlying meaning, then perhaps your expectations are that everyone has a racist intent. The "South" as you so eloquently put it has always been the easy target and now it's more an over used and tired stereotype.

    And trust me, the south got over the civil war long ago, be nice if every one else could.


    So these "southern racists" you refer to maybe a misguided label in itself.

    How to deal, you might ask yourself how you carry yourself, it certainly doesn’t excuse ass-hole behavior; however, it’s a fact and always has been... People are first judged on appearance – I had a cop when I was younger treat me like I thought I was some rich-shit because when he pulled me over in my car, he assumed the car (I paid for) was daddy’s and the suit I was in was proof of my snobby-wealth. When, in fact, I was barely middle-class, lived in the burbs, and was paying for that car myself with a job working in a warehouse and the suit I had on was because I had just left a wedding. Dress like a thug and you’re treated like a thug...
    As an adult and business man, when young men show up to interviews with their pants down around their ass cheeks it raises a quick question of respect and professionalism – I get it, it “the style”, but its your style not necessarily the job/place you are hoping to “fit in” to.
    May suck, but it is what it is... you learn to deal.


    First, thank you all so much for your replies. I truly appreciate it.

    NOW FOR THE POSTER ABOVE, WHICH REALLY PISSED ME OFF.

    This post reeks of the same condescending undertones I've encountered from racists in the South. And I sense that you're not aware of it. You're assuming several things about me that aren't true. First of all, why do you think my 'style' is not in accord with my position as a student? Assuming that I dress like a 'thug' and carry myself in any way other than professional is in itself racist. But then again, (and I hate that this sounds racist) you're a white guy from North Carolina, I dont expect you to be any different than the racists in Georgia. For the record, I wear scrubs to school, and I was raised in Europe; I brought with me with the finesse and behavioral courtesies of the Old World that are lost on some Americans.

    Your story about the cop brings a REALLY interesting point. Let's compare it with a personal experience. I'm dead broke since I'm in school full time, but my parents are affluent. My dad bought a new Benz 2 months ago and I took it for a drive. I decided to take the interstate and head to North Georgia to enjoy a long ride. Well, I get stopped by a cop (a white cop) for not wearing a seat belt (valid reason). He asks for my license, etc. Me and my dad share the same first and last names, so I figured it'd be no problem, I told him the car was his. Well he asked me what I did for a living, I said I was a student. Then he asked me to step out of the car, and that he had reason to believe the vehicle was stolen! I dont even think he ran the plates. He handcuffed me and put me in the back of his cruiser. We had to wait half an hour until my parents got there and explained. I have never been so humiliated. The guy didn't even apologize for the 'misunderstanding'.

    It is true that racism can be found anywhere in the US. But I lived a long time in Miami and then New York, never did I feel like a second class citizen in these cities. True the metropolis lifestyle is different, but human nature should be universal. Lately I've found myself fighting racist urges myself (see the comment above), and I hate that I'm becoming something I hate so much. Even the sight of the Confederate flag (and it's plastered in the back of every other truck) makes me feel like I don't belong here. Maybe I'm being hypersensitive, maybe not. Ultimately the South might be a great place for some people, but not for me.

    Today I applied for a transfer to NYU.
  • alleykatt

    Posts: 21

    Oct 02, 2008 6:02 PM GMT
    I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but as a kid growing up in the South, I grew up with all sorts of races around, and I never really thought about it much. I did hear some people say things, but I avoided those people.

    Granted, while in the north Louisiana Bible belt, I didn't see many mixed race couples, which is why I took note of it when I first moved to New Orleans, but not because I disapproved, but because I was a little fascinated. I thought it was cool.

    And it wasn't until I was dating a guy who'd grown up in Boston, lived in San Francisco for years, lived in West Palm Beach for years, and moved to New Orleans that I realized there was a much bigger problem than I was aware of. This guy found out that I had dated (unfortunately didn't even consumate) a guy who was half black and half white. He jumped up in the bed, totally horrified. Had I not been so young and stupid, I would have avoided him as I did with the others.

    I would later find that a comment my mother made would ring true in my dealings as a Bourbon Street bartender with a pretty wide spectrum of customers and my dealings with the airline...another wide spectrum of customers, which is, I have never met a southerner as racist as some of the northerners I've encountered.

    My point is that Southerners, by virtue of the fact, aren't racist, just like how presumptuous it would be of me to say that because of my personal experience, all northerners are racist.

    And while we're talking about it, I have been on the receiving end of what I'd call reverse racism; reverse meaning that I'm the supposed majority getting treated differently. A genuine smile usually diffuses those kinds of situations. If that doesn't work, then they're not worth your time...

    Ahh.. I'm rambling... Sorry. icon_wink.gif
  • D972

    Posts: 125

    Oct 02, 2008 6:15 PM GMT
    I don't know, I went to a Deny's in South Carolina while driving up to New York from Florida, and it was segregated. One half of the room was black and the other half was white. And when I sat down next to the white couple at the bar, they quickly took their food and went to the white side.

    Also all my friends told me very quickly not to go over 65 mph while traveling in S. Carolina. The results would not be good. Of course that is hearsay, but I wasn't going to be the one to try to disprove my friends theory.
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    Oct 02, 2008 6:19 PM GMT
    You've now made my point and sadly grossly missed the mark on mine.
    Angst Much?

    You bring on the negativity - I never stated how you dress. I stated some might look at how they carry themselves and how that might make others "view" them.

    If you took it personally as you obviously do plenty, tuff shit.

    Get over yourself, not everything that happens in the world is specifically about you.

    Congratualtions on proving what a self righteous judgemental little fuck you are. All you've done again and again is label. So again congrats on proving you are not far from being those in your words - that are assholes!

    Maybe if you spent a little extra time getting to know people and asking questions as opposed to "jumping to conclusions and accustations" they and you might learn something. But that would be too much to ask, I guess.

    And be pissed at me if you want, I never judged you in my response I only purposed that you Walk a mile in someone else shoes to gain perspective.

    And by the way little know it all - I'm not from North Carolina.
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    Oct 02, 2008 6:52 PM GMT
    I'm of a mixed background and I'm from North Carolina. As a guy who has lived in the North, West and South, I have learned that when people ask me what my race is, it's out of curiosity. Mixed races are very common in the South (thanks to massa!). Racist people are everywhere, the South is probably more liberated than most people give it credit for. Race will always be an issue in the United States, but class divisions are a bigger problem .
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    Oct 02, 2008 6:54 PM GMT
    It's crazy not to recognize that racism is more overt in the South than elsewhere. Maybe there are some comparative regional studies; I dunno.

    But why do you think the Dixiecrat party formed here? Why do you think Southerners switched from the Democratic party to the GOP? What about the "southern strategy"? Why did the Klan flourish here? Why did the federal government have to re-draw Southern election districts?

    It's all well and good to say that was then and this is now, but it has not been that long since the South's political culture was just about entirely based on race. Racism is less public now since it's become impolite (Southern manners, ya know). But it's still a huge shadow that hangs over the South to a degree we often don't recognize our own racism.

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    Oct 02, 2008 7:16 PM GMT
    D972 said
    Also all my friends told me very quickly not to go over 65 mph while traveling in S. Carolina. The results would not be good. Of course that is hearsay, but I wasn't going to be the one to try to disprove my friends theory.


    Driving through Georgia in my Army uniform, I ran into a long line of cars stopped on a 2-lane highway. I inched forward until I could see that police officers had blocked the road, and were searching each and every car, and their occupants.

    When my turn came they opened all my doors and trunk, went through my glove box, and gave me a pat-down as I was spread-eagled against the outside of my car. When I asked what this was about, I was told to "Shut the fuck up, it's none of your business!" I was released and drove away, without ever knowing what it was all about.

    Illegal? I think so. But one has few options under those circumstances, against armed police officers, which I never encountered anywhere else in the United States. Call it a fluke if you want, but it only ever happened to me in Georgia.
  • alleykatt

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    Oct 02, 2008 7:20 PM GMT
    Maybe Louisiana is different than the rest of the South. Google P.B.S. Pinchback(LA-R). I've never lived in any other deep southern states, though.

    But I'm not crazy for there being more racists in Atlanta than in the whole state of Louisiana. I've never in my entire life seen a KKK member. I've heard about them in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Mississippi. Furthermore, how does the GOP have anything to do with the South and racism? Look up Huey P. Long (LA-D).

    I think I might be too much of an idealist....

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    Oct 02, 2008 7:55 PM GMT
    BodyWork4 saidYou've now made my point and sadly grossly missed the mark on mine.
    Angst Much?

    You bring on the negativity - I never stated how you dress. I stated some might look at how they carry themselves and how that might make others "view" them.

    If you took it personally as you obviously do plenty, tuff shit.

    Get over yourself, not everything that happens in the world is specifically about you.

    Congratualtions on proving what a self righteous judgemental little fuck you are. All you've done again and again is label. So again congrats on proving you are not far from being those in your words - that are assholes!

    Maybe if you spent a little extra time getting to know people and asking questions as opposed to "jumping to conclusions and accustations" they and you might learn something. But that would be too much to ask, I guess.

    And be pissed at me if you want, I never judged you in my response I only purposed that you Walk a mile in someone else shoes to gain perspective.

    And by the way little know it all - I'm not from North Carolina.


    wow. is all that anger gratuitous or does it come with a KKK membership?

    Clearly applying logic with you is useless. So I'll just write you off as another crazy southerner with a superiority complex.

    Go hunt your dinner.

    and consider yourself ignored icon_biggrin.gif