Alzheimer's numbers to triple by 2050, report says

  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Feb 07, 2013 11:02 PM GMT
    Alzheimer's numbers to triple by 2050, report says

    http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/02/06/16872274-alzheimers-numbers-to-triple-by-2050-report-says?lite=
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    Feb 08, 2013 1:17 AM GMT
    I've watched a few family members slowly deteriorate till death with Alzheimer's. In the early stages, it seems their mind comes and goes...having periods of clear thinking in between longer periods of dementia. During their clear moments, they know they have Alzheimer's.

    If this ever happens to me, I will kill myself during one of my clear moments. After seeing the effects of it, I think that until a cure is developed, this would be a very legitimate case for assisted suicide. That is no way to live out your last days.
  • metta

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    Feb 08, 2013 2:18 AM GMT
    From what I have read, they are hoping that they will come up with a cocktail, similar to how they are treating AID's. But they are still many years away from that.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Feb 08, 2013 2:21 AM GMT
    metta8 saidFrom what I have read, they are hoping that they will come up with a cocktail, similar to how they are treating AID's. But they are still many years away from that.


    We don't even fully understand why it happens.

    It might just be that we're living long enough that the body has to take extreme measures for nature to run its course, since we're fighting it at every turn.
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    Feb 08, 2013 3:06 AM GMT
    metta8 saidFrom what I have read, they are hoping that they will come up with a cocktail, similar to how they are treating AID's. But they are still many years away from that.
    I'm currently drinking a cocktail that may not prevent Alzheimer's, but it'll certainly make me forget I have it if I drink enough of them. icon_lol.gif
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    Feb 08, 2013 3:08 AM GMT
    Sad. I'm currently watching my Grandmother go through this and when someone you've loved your whole life ask who are you are, it is literally a knife through your heart. I can't imagine going through that.
  • Breeman

    Posts: 339

    Feb 08, 2013 3:12 AM GMT
    My father seems to have some signs of it lately. I spend a lot more time with him now. I try to keep him active mentally and physically as much as possible.
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    Feb 08, 2013 7:21 AM GMT
    We're getting much closer to understanding the physical processes behind it. Where the problem lies is in detecting it early enough to effectively intervene. In most cases by the time Alzheimer's actually show's symptoms the disease process has been underway for 10 to 20 years. New research in blood borne biomarkers is beginning to give some hope that one day you'll have a screen for it that is just as routine as a cholesterol test. The approach of trying to stop or reverse it once it becomes symptomatic 10 to 20 years after it started is one hell of a clinical research challenge.
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    Feb 08, 2013 9:39 AM GMT
    The one thing we know which reduces the risk of getting dementia is exercise! And the earlier we start it the better.
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    Feb 08, 2013 10:20 AM GMT
    There seems to be a connection between diabetes and Alzheimer's as well
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    Feb 13, 2013 4:30 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidI've watched a few family members slowly deteriorate till death with Alzheimer's. In the early stages, it seems their mind comes and goes...having periods of clear thinking in between longer periods of dementia. During their clear moments, they know they have Alzheimer's.

    If this ever happens to me, I will kill myself during one of my clear moments. After seeing the effects of it, I think that until a cure is developed, this would be a very legitimate case for assisted suicide. That is no way to live out your last days.


    As every victim experienced AD differently, depending on various factors, if you see it in yourself and have that confirmed, do not count on it progressing how you've previously observed.

    As to your plan B, a few things to keep in mind: being effected by the disease might lull you into accepting it, negating plan B. But also, even if you are already in the throws of it and have a lucid day, even if you are lucid enough to complete your thoughts, you might not be lucid enough to carry out those thoughts into action. So for you to assure your plan B, you'd have to be willing to give up possibly even some years of relatively healthy life before Alzheimer's takes hold, or suffer its torments.

    As even growing older might change your mind on plan B, even before you get Alzheimer's ie it might not seem as scary then as it does now or every moment might seem more precious to you then than it does now, etc., and as dementia negates our ability to be absolutely assured that a person has not changed their mind, assisted suicide, I think, ought not be an option for victims of dementia.

    My experience with that is by my mom who indicated that she'd had enough after she was no longer able to carry out the task herself, but I knew that if she hadn't dementia, she never would have asked me to risk my life in jail. So I knew that was not my mother in her right mind at the time and all I could do was watch her suffer and keep her as safe and comfortable as possible. I did not have the right to interfere with her life once she did not take that final step herself while she she had her window of opportunity.
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    Feb 13, 2013 4:46 AM GMT
    msuNtx saidSad. I'm currently watching my Grandmother go through this and when someone you've loved your whole life ask who are you are, it is literally a knife through your heart. I can't imagine going through that.


    Sorry for you and your family. I did this in also in my 20s with grandpa and then in my 40s with mom. I don't think grandpa ever forgot me, hard to tell, he only ever called me "boy" anyway. I don't believe he ever knew my name.

    Mom knew me for the most part throughout and up until the very end but there were some times where she got confused as to our relationship, particularly when I'd be holding her as we walked and she'd slip her hand down the back of my pants. Oooops. So I'm pretty sure she wasn't thinking of me as her son in those moments. I had probably become her childhood boyfriend, whatever. That didn't happen a lot, just a few times and then she'd go back to being my mom, just my mom with Alzheimer's.

    But what my point is for you is that that even though they may forget exactly who you are, very often they do remember at some level a connection, the love between you. It's hard for you to watch, I know, but it is even more difficult on a spouse or their children so as tough as it might be, be supportive of them. And always keep in mind that your grandma didn't chose to forget; she was robbed of her memory. Keep the love.
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    Feb 13, 2013 4:52 AM GMT
    This breaks my heart. After watching my grandmother deteriorate and pass away from this, it breaks my heart to know that so many other people will suffer because of this.

    To everyone out there, eat right, stay active, (as if I needed to say that here), but most importantly never let your mind deteriorate.
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    Feb 13, 2013 4:53 AM GMT
    jackbennett saidThe one thing we know which reduces the risk of getting dementia is exercise! And the earlier we start it the better.


    Essentially the thinking is what's good for the heart is good for the brain. So it probably helps but as with most everything, no guarantees. My grandfather was an athlete his entire life (handball and later tennis) and it didn't prevent him from getting it. My mom kept a very good figure, swam laps with me, always kept up with the latest science on nutrition, kept her mind active, continued working, did everything she was supposed to that was known at the time, didn't prevent her from getting it either. Though I think all she did kept her very lucid throughout most of it, but even that's double edged because then she was that much more aware of what was happening to her. That was brutal to watch.
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    Feb 13, 2013 4:54 AM GMT
    msuNtx saidSad. I'm currently watching my Grandmother go through this and when someone you've loved your whole life ask who are you are, it is literally a knife through your heart. I can't imagine going through that.


    I'm sorry to hear this msuNtx. Be patient with her and cherish every moment.
  • toastvenom

    Posts: 1020

    Feb 13, 2013 4:54 AM GMT
    well it's a good thing ill forget about that unfortunate statistic in a couple of decades. old age, u suck
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    Feb 13, 2013 4:56 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidI've watched a few family members slowly deteriorate till death with Alzheimer's. In the early stages, it seems their mind comes and goes...having periods of clear thinking in between longer periods of dementia. During their clear moments, they know they have Alzheimer's.

    If this ever happens to me, I will kill myself during one of my clear moments. After seeing the effects of it, I think that until a cure is developed, this would be a very legitimate case for assisted suicide. That is no way to live out your last days.


    I'm certain I would dot the same.
    It's not brain dysfunction, where you can hope cure to be found, it's brain gradual destruction. Even if you wait for miracle cure, the best you can hope is for the progression to stop. I could enjoy life with many physical handicap, but not without my mind.



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    Feb 13, 2013 5:02 AM GMT
    Trollileo saidThis is merely basic human geography. More people are consuming and exposed to harmful chemicals linked to the onset of alzheimer's in developed and post-developed countries. These people will also live longer due to medical advancements. So obviously the deterioration of the brain is much more likely in any general population based on the average life span.


    As far as I know the current thinking is that advanced age is the most major risk factor for Alzheimer's Disease. I don't know if science has confirmed any link with harmful chemicals.
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    Feb 13, 2013 5:09 AM GMT
    minox said
    paulflexes saidI've watched a few family members slowly deteriorate till death with Alzheimer's. In the early stages, it seems their mind comes and goes...having periods of clear thinking in between longer periods of dementia. During their clear moments, they know they have Alzheimer's.

    If this ever happens to me, I will kill myself during one of my clear moments. After seeing the effects of it, I think that until a cure is developed, this would be a very legitimate case for assisted suicide. That is no way to live out your last days.


    I'm certain I would dot the same.
    It's not brain dysfunction, where you can hope cure to be found, it's brain gradual destruction. Even if you wait for miracle cure, the best you can hope is for the progression to stop. I could enjoy life with many physical handicap, but not without my mind.


    I tend to agree and I hope that I have it in me to end my suffering should I see it happening but I must note that even with the destruction of the brain, I was stunned to see how well my mother maintained herself up until her death. We didn't autopsy but I wouldn 't be surprised if half or more of her brain had been destroyed. But it seriously seemed as if---and I know this is gonna sound weird--it seemed as if she could move herself to the parts of her brain which had not yet been destroyed. She kept her personality that well intact throughout the whole fucking thing.
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    Feb 13, 2013 5:17 AM GMT
    Breeman saidMy father seems to have some signs of it lately. I spend a lot more time with him now. I try to keep him active mentally and physically as much as possible.


    You're a good son. Don't hestitate to contact your local Alzheimer's Association branch for more ideas on how to manage this. I was caregiver and then guardian for my mom for many years. Feel free to ask any questions or email if you want to bounce off any ideas.