Question for Non-US citizens who have spent a significant amount of time (months or years) in the US...

  • WhoDey

    Posts: 561

    Feb 08, 2013 4:55 PM GMT
    Did you find it easy or hard to make friends with US citizens who's families have been in the country for generations? Did you find yourself being friends with mostly non-citizens and recent immigrants?
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    Feb 08, 2013 6:12 PM GMT
    It depends on the age of reference. I was 8 yo when we moved to the States and as a kid, I adapted easily to American life. So I didn't have problems making friends and almost all of my friends growing up were Americans.
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    Feb 08, 2013 7:25 PM GMT
    Well, I'm a US citizen, but I came here from Spain when I was 6-7 years old. I think being that young, it was pretty easy to adapt to a new environment. I remember making friends without a problem in school.

    By pure coincidence, however, my neighbors across the street were also from Spain who had been living in the US just over a year. The family's daughter was my childhood best friend and the only person I ever really spoke Spanish with (Spanglish really). I don't recall too many immigrant families in my town at the time, although there certainly are plenty now.
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    Feb 08, 2013 11:11 PM GMT
    It was easy for me, nearly easier than in my own country.
    I would not like to live in US, but I like many things about the people and the culture.
  • gooddude1583

    Posts: 100

    Feb 08, 2013 11:30 PM GMT
    I've been in the US for more than 2 years now. Maybe part of it is my nature and the lab I work in, but I mostly made foreign friends. I think it really depends on your age and state of mind. Either way, I'd be happy to make more gay friends, American or foreign.
  • Sportsfan1

    Posts: 479

    Feb 08, 2013 11:39 PM GMT
    I was about 3 years old when we(family) came to the United States. This is the only home I have ever known. I was 17 when I became a citizen of the United States. Fortunately I am fully bilingual (Spanish/English). I have friends that are native born and immigrant. I do not have a discernible accent in either language and that helps.
  • WhoDey

    Posts: 561

    Feb 08, 2013 11:47 PM GMT
    I'm just asking because lately I've been talking to people (in their 20s) who feel a little disappointed because when they were here, they didn't meet too many American friends, and the ones they met and became close to were all from different countries
  • thatirishbast...

    Posts: 3523

    Feb 08, 2013 11:58 PM GMT
    Am I qualified to answer? I was born a dual Irish and American citizen, but I grew up in Ireland until I was 15 and then immigrated to the states. Going to high school here forced me to make friends among the Americans, there was no other community to be a part of. I also came to a small farming and lumber town, so there wasn't any other immigrant community to be a part of.

    Now that I live in Chicago, I find that many of my friends are among the immigrant and ex-pat community. It keeps the homesickness at bay, and I sometimes need the culture fix. Not just music and dance and food, but people who understand my cultural references, have watched the same programmes and been to the same places. There is a strong Irish-American community as well, but I avoid them because they irritate me. But many of my friends are also Americans, whose families have been here many years.
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    Feb 09, 2013 12:14 AM GMT
    I have been here like 1 year and a half.
    I made a few friends with my neighbors, who are citizens.
    But not many.
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    Feb 09, 2013 12:21 AM GMT
    Language barriers usually present the biggest problem for newly arrived immigrants. Obviously those from other Anglophone countries have a much easier time adapting to life in the US speaking the same language. For them it's just a matter of learning unfamiliar American words and expressions over time. But those who don't have English as a native language might have various degrees of success in making American friends right away. However, I've seen plenty of people who can barely communicate with each other somehow make a lasting relationship.