Vitamin C- a miracle in a tablet!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 09, 2013 5:24 AM GMT
    I tried something new and have had amazing results:

    I have been taking 2 g of vitamin C every morning since November. During this past flu season, I came into contact with all sorts of shit, including a parental sleepover with both of them sick as dogs with flu. That was 3 weeks ago, and I have not missed a step since then.

    I did get poison oak last weekend and I am seriously allergic to it. I took 8- 10 g of Vit. C every day during my outbreak (I also had to go to the ER and get a cortisone steroid shot) and already 1 week later I am almost over it. Three years ago I had the same poison oak outbreak (including shot) and it took at least 2 weeks to recover from that.

    A huge thing of 1000mg Vit. C at Trader Joe's is less than $8. I still have about 2 months supply left of mine.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Feb 09, 2013 2:29 PM GMT
    glad you think that... but the science is that your body can only handle so much vitamin c, and then you just piss the rest out.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 09, 2013 2:31 PM GMT
    Strawberries have 3 times the vitamin C as oranges. Keep the berries coming!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 09, 2013 2:33 PM GMT
    I had the same thing with poison ivy.... taking 2mg every 2 hours to stop the itch... it worked and kept me from dying .... had it over 70% of my body until i got the predisone. That was before i discovered limes... no more predisone or inflammation. They contain a very high dose of bioflavanoid Vitamin C. The lime juice works as an anti inflammatory... and I never have to worry about asthma, arthritis, poison ivy, bruising or a myraid of other things. It's not hard on my stomach and i only take it when i need it. i found the pills to be really harsh after awhile.

    Take 2 limes squeeze the juice out of them and add water to fill the glass ... down it right away. Vitamin C degrades very quickly don't make up a jug and keep it in the fridge... do the fresh thing. You'll find a lot of other benefits that i'm not going to tell you about....lol.... this is one of the best sources of Vitamin C that's why the English had it on their ships for the past 300 years..
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Feb 09, 2013 8:59 PM GMT
    calibro saidglad you think that... but the science is that your body can only handle so much vitamin c, and then you just piss the rest out.


    I've heard conflicting reports on that. Personally I notice a huge difference when I load up on vitamin C--and it's not just that I feel better. My skin, hair, nails, gums, all seem healthier! I used to take other supplements, like green tea extract, but they gave me heartburn. Vitamin C doesn't cause heartburn for me. The brand I take also has rose hips in it. So that might be part of it.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Feb 09, 2013 9:01 PM GMT
    calguy456 saidStrawberries have 3 times the vitamin C as oranges. Keep the berries coming!


    Red peppers have the highest Vitamin C of all. Dr. Oz called red peppers nature's botox.
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    Feb 09, 2013 9:15 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    calibro saidglad you think that... but the science is that your body can only handle so much vitamin c, and then you just piss the rest out.


    I've heard conflicting reports on that. Personally I notice a huge difference when I load up on vitamin C--and it's not just that I feel better. My skin, hair, nails, gums, all seem healthier! I used to take other supplements, like green tea extract, but they gave me heartburn. Vitamin C doesn't cause heartburn for me. The brand I take also has rose hips in it. So that might be part of it.

    1+
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 10, 2013 6:10 PM GMT
    "Studies of the use of prophylactic vitamin C have yielded inconsistent results. A randomized five-year trial performed in Japan found that vitamin C supplementation at a dose of 500 mg daily, compared to 50 mg daily, significantly reduced the frequency of colds (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.12-0.97), but these supplements had no apparent effect on the duration or severity of the common cold. In contrast, a meta-analysis involving 29 studies in which 11,000 participants were randomly assigned to take prophylactic vitamin C (minimum dose 200 mg) or placebo found no statistically significant benefit for vitamin C in the prevention of upper respiratory infection (pooled RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.92- 1.00). There was a 50 percent decrease in the incidence of colds in a subset of patients exposed to vigorous activity, especially in extreme cold conditions (marathon runners, skiers, and soldiers in sub-arctic exercises). We conclude that, at best, vitamin C has a small and minor role in preventing the common cold. Its preventive effect may be greater for persons involved in high-intensity physical activity in arctic conditions."

    So, in summary, it may have some small benefit in preventing the onset of a viral illness, but has no value in decreasing the symptoms once they're there. Interesting.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Feb 10, 2013 6:13 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    calibro saidglad you think that... but the science is that your body can only handle so much vitamin c, and then you just piss the rest out.


    I've heard conflicting reports on that. Personally I notice a huge difference when I load up on vitamin C--and it's not just that I feel better. My skin, hair, nails, gums, all seem healthier! I used to take other supplements, like green tea extract, but they gave me heartburn. Vitamin C doesn't cause heartburn for me. The brand I take also has rose hips in it. So that might be part of it.


    I read a study in which several individuals consumed megadoses of vitamin c, then had their urine analyzed over the next four hours. 95% of their consumed vitamin c was literally pissed down the drain.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Feb 10, 2013 6:16 PM GMT
    oozyrat said"Studies of the use of prophylactic vitamin C have yielded inconsistent results. A randomized five-year trial performed in Japan found that vitamin C supplementation at a dose of 500 mg daily, compared to 50 mg daily, significantly reduced the frequency of colds (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.12-0.97), but these supplements had no apparent effect on the duration or severity of the common cold. In contrast, a meta-analysis involving 29 studies in which 11,000 participants were randomly assigned to take prophylactic vitamin C (minimum dose 200 mg) or placebo found no statistically significant benefit for vitamin C in the prevention of upper respiratory infection (pooled RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.92- 1.00). There was a 50 percent decrease in the incidence of colds in a subset of patients exposed to vigorous activity, especially in extreme cold conditions (marathon runners, skiers, and soldiers in sub-arctic exercises). We conclude that, at best, vitamin C has a small and minor role in preventing the common cold. Its preventive effect may be greater for persons involved in high-intensity physical activity in arctic conditions."

    So, in summary, it may have some small benefit in preventing the onset of a viral illness, but has no value in decreasing the symptoms once they're there. Interesting.


    That idea is based in myth from a while back. The guys name slips my mind, but he was a very prominent biochemist. He suggested, based on conceptual understanding, that megadoses of vitamin c wold have an immune support function and toxicological effect on infections. However, it was purely conceptual with no studies done. He even wrote a book on the subject. I amazed, based on how unsupported it was, how widespread the assertion became.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 11, 2013 11:40 PM GMT
    calibro saidglad you think that... but the science is that your body can only handle so much vitamin c, and then you just piss the rest out.


    Wrong.

  • Zinc

    Posts: 197

    Feb 12, 2013 12:01 AM GMT
    Medjai said
    HottJoe said
    calibro saidglad you think that... but the science is that your body can only handle so much vitamin c, and then you just piss the rest out.


    I've heard conflicting reports on that. Personally I notice a huge difference when I load up on vitamin C--and it's not just that I feel better. My skin, hair, nails, gums, all seem healthier! I used to take other supplements, like green tea extract, but they gave me heartburn. Vitamin C doesn't cause heartburn for me. The brand I take also has rose hips in it. So that might be part of it.


    I read a study in which several individuals consumed megadoses of vitamin c, then had their urine analyzed over the next four hours. 95% of their consumed vitamin c was literally pissed down the drain.


    High doses of vitamin C do increase serum concentrations and more importantly, over time your cells increase their concentrations too. You also pee 95% of the water you drink, but does that mean you can't accumulate water? Of course not.

    Most drugs you take also get peed out, btw.
  • Zinc

    Posts: 197

    Feb 12, 2013 12:04 AM GMT
    Vitamin C remains an important anti-oxidant, a cofactor in the production of collagen, and it can even work as an anti-histamine. Taking a gram or two a day isn't going to hurt and potentially benefits us.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 12, 2013 1:00 AM GMT
    Placebo effect, anyone?
  • HottJoe

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    Feb 12, 2013 1:10 AM GMT
    credo saidPlacebo effect, anyone?


    Vitamin C isn't a placebo. You'll get scurvy without it.icon_eek.gif
  • jim_sf

    Posts: 2094

    Feb 12, 2013 1:14 AM GMT
    HottJoe saidMy skin, hair, nails, gums, all seem healthier!


    ...dude. Did you have scurvy?

    On the antiscorbutic front, though: the English Royal Navy didn't stock fresh limes for their journeys, because citrus doesn't keep long enough for a sail-powered vessel to cross an ocean. Instead, they used lemon juice, and later lime juice, though there was still plenty of debate about just what caused scurvy until the 1930s.
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    Feb 12, 2013 1:20 AM GMT
    HottJoe said
    credo saidPlacebo effect, anyone?


    Vitamin C isn't a placebo. You'll get scurvy without it.icon_eek.gif


    This isn't about scurvy, it's about vitamin C being a miracle in a tablet. Vitamin C is beneficial, but it doesn't stop you from getting a cold or the flu.

    Eat a decent amount of fruits and veggies a day, drink plenty of water and get a good amount of sleep, and you'll realize more health benefits than popping a vitamin C tablet.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Feb 12, 2013 1:23 AM GMT
    Challenge: for those convinced its a miracle, find a peer reviewed study to back it up. I have never heard of one. Everything I've read suggests that dosing vitamin c beyond daily need is just a waste.

    Also a challenge, define antioxidant and immune booster. They are generic meaningless terms that sound important but don't really mean anything biologically. Free radicals are highly necessary to life, and very, very rarely outside of their control mechanisms.
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    Feb 12, 2013 1:37 AM GMT
    Zinc saidVitamin C remains an important anti-oxidant, a cofactor in the production of collagen, and it can even work as an anti-histamine. Taking a gram or two a day isn't going to hurt and potentially benefits us.


    from http://www.pnas.org/content/93/8/3704.full.pdf

    plasma concentrations were near saturation at 400mg daily, and there may be adverse consequences at doses >1000 mg

    Not an expert on the subject, but the half life is 30mn, and the bio availability decrease as dose increase.
    It means that the higher dose doesn't change proportionally plasma concentration during the day.

    Actually, it's so hard to reach high plasma levels of vitamin C that studying it's in-vivo role against cancer should require intravascular administration instead oral doses.

    I'm all for cheap and very safe health enhancer, yet, personally, I won't play the guinea pig with doses outside levels where the health benefit is demonstrated.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 12, 2013 1:46 AM GMT
    Medjai saidChallenge: for those convinced its a miracle, find a peer reviewed study to back it up. I have never heard of one. Everything I've read suggests that dosing vitamin c beyond daily need is just a waste.

    Also a challenge, define antioxidant and immune booster. They are generic meaningless terms that sound important but don't really mean anything biologically. Free radicals are highly necessary to life, and very, very rarely outside of their control mechanisms.


    About anti oxidant benefit, did you read the stuff about C. Elegans apparently living longer when one of his anti oxidant expression is neutralised ?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free-radical_theory_of_aging

    I agree with you that extrapolating knowledge, in biology, need to be backed up by objective testing, in vivo.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Feb 12, 2013 1:51 AM GMT
    Jim_stl ...dude. Did you have scurvy?


    Shhh, no one on here knows I used to be a pirate.

    (and no, Rad, I'm not talking about being an ass pirate.) icon_razz.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 12, 2013 1:55 AM GMT
    HottJoe said
    Jim_stl ...dude. Did you have scurvy?


    Shhh, no one on here knows I used to be a pirate.

    (and no, Rad, I'm not talking about being an ass pirate.) icon_razz.gif


    Better be a dick pirate, I heard there is some vitamins in sperm ;)
  • Zinc

    Posts: 197

    Feb 12, 2013 2:02 AM GMT
    Medjai said
    Also a challenge, define antioxidant and immune booster. They are generic meaningless terms that sound important but don't really mean anything biologically. Free radicals are highly necessary to life, and very, very rarely outside of their control mechanisms.



    That must be why there's a consensus that free-radical damage is at the center of aging, cancer, and other chronic diseases. icon_rolleyes.gif

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22868792
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Feb 12, 2013 2:05 AM GMT
    I drank orange juice and took ColdFX and still got sick all of the time. I don't remember why now, but I started eating one of those gigantic oranges every morning for breakfast (with a protein shake. Dude it's realjock right?)

    I have not had a cold since starting that, but it wasn't intentional. It was 2 years later that I realized I was still healthy when all of my co-workers were sick with a cold or influenza.
  • Zinc

    Posts: 197

    Feb 12, 2013 2:08 AM GMT
    minox said
    Medjai saidChallenge: for those convinced its a miracle, find a peer reviewed study to back it up. I have never heard of one. Everything I've read suggests that dosing vitamin c beyond daily need is just a waste.

    Also a challenge, define antioxidant and immune booster. They are generic meaningless terms that sound important but don't really mean anything biologically. Free radicals are highly necessary to life, and very, very rarely outside of their control mechanisms.


    About anti oxidant benefit, did you read the stuff about C. Elegans apparently living longer when one of his anti oxidant expression is neutralised ?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free-radical_theory_of_aging

    I agree with you that extrapolating knowledge, in biology, need to be backed up by objective testing, in vivo.


    From the Abstract:
    1. "Examination of gene expression in these mutants reveals mild compensatory up-regulation of other sod genes."

    -So delete one SOD gene, and that up regulates others. The organism is compensating.

    2. " Combined with the mitochondrial localization of SOD-2 and the fact that sod-2 mutant worms exhibit phenotypes that are characteristic of long-lived mitochondrial mutants-including slow development, low brood size, and slow defecation-this suggests that deletion of sod-2 extends lifespan through a similar mechanism. This conclusion is supported by our demonstration of decreased oxygen consumption in sod-2 mutant worms."

    The gene deletion seems to slow the overall metabolism and growth of the worm, possibly another symptom of reacting to oxidative stress. This actually goes in support of the free radical aging hypothesis since the organism is trying to reduce it in the face of a genetic handicap.