Types of lifting...

  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Feb 13, 2013 6:48 PM GMT
    So this may be an oversimplification, but bare with me:

    What kind of lifting do you do (single muscle, single muscle group, compound muscle group)? Why? What are the pros and cons?

    For example, for quads, there's the leg extensions that get just that spot, the leg press that gets the whole leg, and thrusters, which is legs and shoulders.

    I'm starting to enjoy compound lifts more, and wondering if that's the best way to be working out. I do put functional strength over appearance, so it makes sense to m. Looking for input and suggestions.
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    Feb 13, 2013 7:04 PM GMT
    Not really sure if this is what you are talking about, but most of my workout is about muscle isolation and form focus. With that being said, I will say that it is important to mix things up in regards to how you attack a muscle or group. If you only did one exercise for a certain body part, that muscle will become limited to the range of motion that it allows. I like to hit muscles from every angle a couple times a workout, makes for a well rounded muscle.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Feb 13, 2013 7:10 PM GMT
    dudewithabeard saidNot really sure if this is what you are talking about, but most of my workout is about muscle isolation and form focus. With that being said, I will say that it is important to mix things up in regards to how you attack a muscle or group. If you only did one exercise for a certain body part, that muscle will become limited to the range of motion that it allows. I like to hit muscles from every angle a couple times a workout, makes for a well rounded muscle.


    I'm meaning is it better to do isolation (each of the three triceps as individually as possible), as a group (push-ups), or combined with other groups (bench press). My examples may not be great. I'm kind of fumbling as to how to word this...
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    Feb 13, 2013 7:17 PM GMT
    Medjai said
    dudewithabeard saidNot really sure if this is what you are talking about, but most of my workout is about muscle isolation and form focus. With that being said, I will say that it is important to mix things up in regards to how you attack a muscle or group. If you only did one exercise for a certain body part, that muscle will become limited to the range of motion that it allows. I like to hit muscles from every angle a couple times a workout, makes for a well rounded muscle.


    I'm meaning is it better to do isolation (each of the three triceps as individually as possible), as a group (push-ups), or combined with other groups (bench press). My examples may not be great. I'm kind of fumbling as to how to word this...


    I think breaking it down that much, ie. the 3 triceps, might be over-thinking it. I am not going to say that I have never done that, but it would be just by chance. I would imagine that detailed of a workout would take a long time and I am already in there more than a good minute. I am definitely going to have to say I am more of a group kind of lifter.
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    Feb 13, 2013 7:27 PM GMT
    I'm not quite sure what you're on about here. If I get the drift...

    Most of the time, my workouts focus on a muscle group (e.g. leg day, chest day, etc.) and are a combination of single muscle, group and compound exercises. This seems to be good for hypertrophy, but maybe neglects supporting muscles and "functional strength".

    But around the first of the year, I switched to one of these RJ 12-week programs, which is pretty much all compound whole-body moves, with hardly any focused exercises, and (so far) no really heavy lifting. Still not sure about the results, but it has definitely "discovered" a lot of supporting muscles that have been neglected. Sometimes it feels like my major muscles are "deflating" a bit, but in fact, I've gained a few pounds.

    I'm thinking maybe I'll go back to focused, heavy lifting for a few weeks after this, then maybe do it again. But I suppose that one could do heavy lifting for a few days a week and whole-body stuff on weekends. Or maybe that would lead to over-training? Maybe it depends on what sport (if any) you are doing in a particular season.
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    Feb 13, 2013 10:03 PM GMT
    The norm in bodybuilding seems to be about isolation.
    As a former athlete, I always worked on muscular chain, and don't feel good, physically, working on isolation.

    For example, squats needs you to coordinate contraction intensity on hamstring, quadriceps, ischio, gluts, abs, lower abs/oblics, and all the spine muscular support.

    Doing like that, you are limited by your weak point. it's a strong incentive to get harmonious muscular development.

    The pleasure I take in training is in part linked to what I can with my body.
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    Feb 13, 2013 10:11 PM GMT
    I don't think all one of the other is the best option. Compound lifts are the foundation of both weightlifting and bodybuilding. They cause your body to release the hormones that build muscle. For that reason I like to make sure I have one or 2 in at least every workout.

    Then for other muscles like biceps, isolation is really hard to avoid. You're going to have to do curls for example one way or another. Another reason you might want to isolate is if you feel you're lacking somewhere and want it to catch up. When I started doing deadlifts I found my grip was limiting my weights so I started doing isolation exercises for my forearms which helped a lot.
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    Feb 13, 2013 10:14 PM GMT
    Medjai saidSo this may be an oversimplification, but bare with me:

    What kind of lifting do you do (single muscle, single muscle group, compound muscle group)?
    Shop.
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    Feb 13, 2013 11:28 PM GMT
    Trying to do sone of themall -- compound, isolations, total body, functional. Split routine is still for lifting, but incorporating functional and total body. Today was one of the latter -- anaconda ropes, sled push, sledgehammer swings, KB deadlifts and speed bag. Tomorrow is a rest day, Friday back to traditional weight moves for arms and shoulders.
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    Feb 13, 2013 11:52 PM GMT
    Medjai saidSo this may be an oversimplification, but bare with me:

    What kind of lifting do you do (single muscle, single muscle group, compound muscle group)? Why? What are the pros and cons?

    For example, for quads, there's the leg extensions that get just that spot, the leg press that gets the whole leg, and thrusters, which is legs and shoulders.

    I'm starting to enjoy compound lifts more, and wondering if that's the best way to be working out. I do put functional strength over appearance, so it makes sense to m. Looking for input and suggestions.


    I think this is all contingent too your goals. Clearly there are advantages to either way.

    As I've gotten older, it's gotten more difficult to do compound movement and I just don't do power-lifting stuff any more. I do, however, do compound movements, but, I also do isolation stuff (at high volume, too). I think both have their place. The deep dumbbell exercises, where I used to flip the 130's up and to incline press, are over for me, my joints, ligaments, and tendons, just won't take it anymore. I end up doing some stuff on the smith machine. I work hard to do agonist / antagonist for balance, but, I still end up tweaking a shoulder, etc.

    I can't over emphasis the importance of stretching, post workout, and while working out. Never before. A full range of motion is essential. I see so many folks at the gym doing half reps, or even 1/4 rep, or shoulder presses on the anterior side, etc. Dumb.

    I think for that bodybuilder look you not only need to stretch, do isolation movements, but also get into high rep ranges, like 15 to 20's to get that vascular look and flush stuff out.