Building Chest Muscle

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 17, 2013 9:08 PM GMT
    Hey guys- a few weeks ago I started regularly lifting for the first time, with the main goal of building more chest muscle. I've been keeping up with it, but notice that after workouts I'm feeling it more in my arm muscles than in my chest. Since I'm really just starting to lift weights for the first time, I've been doing the bench press and chest fly's (as well as some other ones for non-chest muscles).

    Guess I'm just wondering if this is to be expected, especially since I started just fairly recently, or if it's an indication that I may be doing the lifts wrong? Thanks!
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    Feb 17, 2013 9:57 PM GMT
    When I first started my tricep,biceps, and shoulders weren't developed and got super sore on bench presses and such. It's common for a new lifter that's why I would try one of the beginner lifting programs to build a base to prevent this

    And please work out other parts also just not chest lol
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    Feb 17, 2013 10:25 PM GMT
    If your triceps get tired before your chest does, try gripping the bar a little wider when bench pressing. You'll feel the difference.
    A word of advice, people in your gym may be encouraging you to go deep during a bench (touch the chest!). Be very careful with that. Moving your elbows too far back can easily cause a shoulder injury that'll haunt you for years. I'm speaking from experience. Nowadays I only go as deep as i can without my elbows going over 90 degrees from my body.
  • spacemagic

    Posts: 520

    Feb 17, 2013 11:06 PM GMT
    Buppi saidWhen I first started my tricep,biceps, and shoulders weren't developed and got super sore on bench presses and such. It's common for a new lifter that's why I would try one of the beginner lifting programs to build a base to prevent this

    And please work out other parts also just not chest lol


    This.

    1. You need to develop ALL your muscles, not just one body part. Everything works together, not separately.

    2. If your tri's are wearing out before your chest, you may need to spend a little more time building strength in those muscles. Dips are great for your tri's, and work your outer and upper pec muscles too.

    3. There are tons of chest exercises to round out your workout. Try some variations on the bench press--do incline bench presses, decline bench presses, wide grip, narrow grip, and reverse grip. I just discovered dumbbell pullovers ( http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/PectoralSternal/DBPullover.html ). Pushups are great too. Vary your arm/hand placement to impact different areas.
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    Feb 17, 2013 11:19 PM GMT
    spacemagic said
    Buppi said
    1. You need to develop ALL your muscles, not just one body part. Everything works together, not separately.
    .


    perfectly said, theres a guy in my gym who will only work chest and nothing else. but also try switching up the exercises you do so your muscles stay confused, do dumbbell presses(incline and decline), pullovers, medicine ball push ups, change the weight, switch up the tempo and rest periods
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4433

    Feb 18, 2013 12:22 AM GMT
    If your gym has them, try doing the Hammer Strength incline, flat and decline presses. They'll teach you what good form feels like. You can also sit sideways doing one arm exercises (both directions) on these three machines to increase isolation. But at least add an arm day and a shoulder day. You'll need to add a back day at some point because your body need a strong back to continue to grow the chest. Literally. Don't be afraid to go up in weight pretty fast on these machines but when you do, you should also add dumbbell incline, flat and decline to exercise the stabilizer muscles. Remember, your muscles grow after the workout so drink a protein drink immediately after and don't do the chest again for a couple of days to give it time to heal. THAT is when the muscles get bigger. Use those days to do arms and shoulders. And drink the protein every day.
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    Feb 18, 2013 12:47 AM GMT
    Destinharbor saidYou'll need to add a back day at some point because your body need a strong back to continue to grow the chest.
    Word.
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    Feb 18, 2013 12:49 AM GMT


    Interesting....
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    Feb 18, 2013 1:14 AM GMT
    irishman104 saidHey guys- a few weeks ago I started regularly lifting for the first time, with the main goal of building more chest muscle. I've been keeping up with it, but notice that after workouts I'm feeling it more in my arm muscles than in my chest. Since I'm really just starting to lift weights for the first time, I've been doing the bench press and chest fly's (as well as some other ones for non-chest muscles).

    Guess I'm just wondering if this is to be expected, especially since I started just fairly recently, or if it's an indication that I may be doing the lifts wrong? Thanks!


    You really need to build up all of your muscles, not just the chest. If your pecs develop faster than your back and shoulders, you'll develop "hunched over shoulders." That will cause difficulty growing other muscle groups later on and put you at risk for labrum and rotator cuff injuries as well.

    Plus, without a strong back, you'll eventually get to a point where you can't push more weight and grow larger pecs. This won't be because your body has reached it's Peter Principle, it's because your frame is disproportionate muscle wise.
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    Feb 18, 2013 1:21 AM GMT
    David_NL saidIf your triceps get tired before your chest does, try gripping the bar a little wider when bench pressing. You'll feel the difference.
    A word of advice, people in your gym may be encouraging you to go deep during a bench (touch the chest!). Be very careful with that. Moving your elbows too far back can easily cause a shoulder injury that'll haunt you for years. I'm speaking from experience. Nowadays I only go as deep as i can without my elbows going over 90 degrees from my body.


    Good tip. That's what I do. I stop lowering the weights bar once my upper arms (part of arm between the shoulder and the elbow) are parallel to the ground.
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    Feb 18, 2013 1:41 AM GMT
    Thanks everyone who's responded- your replies have definitely been helpful!

    And no worries- I'm definitely working on my shoulders, back, arms as well; it was just the chest that I was wondering about in particular. Thanks!
  • spacemagic

    Posts: 520

    Feb 18, 2013 2:34 AM GMT
    irishman104 saidThanks everyone who's responded- your replies have definitely been helpful!

    And no worries- I'm definitely working on my shoulders, back, arms as well; it was just the chest that I was wondering about in particular. Thanks!


    PLEASE don't forget about your legs!
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    Feb 18, 2013 4:15 PM GMT
    Appears as though you have all bases covered. It just seems like your chest has grown accustomed to a particular exercise. I would say it's time to move on from that one for a while. Whatever associated benefits you receive from it will most definitely be hit at other parts of your routine.


    ps. welcome to the lifting family and don't forget the progress pics icon_wink.gif