Higgs Boson and the end of the universe. Part I.

  • Zinc

    Posts: 197

    Feb 19, 2013 9:39 PM GMT
    Apparently, if the CERN scientists are correct, the discovery that the Higgs Boson has the mass of 126 protons means that our universe is inherently unstable and is prone to "disappear at the speed of light" some time in the next 10 billion years. Bummer.

    Anyone want to check their math? icon_razz.gif

    http://news.discovery.com/space/higgs-boson-discovery-universe-end-130219.htm

    higgs-boson-universe-end-full-670x440.jp
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    Feb 19, 2013 10:53 PM GMT
    God gifith and God taketh awayith icon_neutral.gif
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    Feb 19, 2013 11:37 PM GMT
    told them 2 let me know when they find the shadow Higgs Boson. only then will we get accurate figures.
  • Zinc

    Posts: 197

    Feb 20, 2013 2:47 AM GMT
    RadRTT saidGod gifith and God taketh awayith icon_neutral.gif


    Curiouser and curiouser.
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    Feb 20, 2013 2:57 AM GMT
    Zinc said
    RadRTT saidGod gifith and God taketh awayith icon_neutral.gif


    Curiouser and curiouser.
    I meant it as the Higgs nickname is the God Particle.
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    Feb 20, 2013 2:57 AM GMT
    RadRTT saidGod gifith and God taketh awayith icon_neutral.gif
    Since when did God post gifs?
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    Feb 20, 2013 2:59 AM GMT
    Zinc saidApparently, if the CERN scientists are correct, the discovery that the Higgs Boson has the mass of 126 protons means that our universe is inherently unstable and is prone to "disappear at the speed of light" some time in the next 10 billion years.


    But the article says: "tens of billions of years from now, the universe will disappear"

    So is it within the next 10 billion years or in 10s of billions of years from now because I need to know whether or not to cancel these reservations.
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    Feb 20, 2013 3:14 AM GMT
    theantijock said
    Zinc saidApparently, if the CERN scientists are correct, the discovery that the Higgs Boson has the mass of 126 protons means that our universe is inherently unstable and is prone to "disappear at the speed of light" some time in the next 10 billion years.


    But the article says: "tens of billions of years from now, the universe will disappear"

    So is it within the next 10 billion years or in 10s of billions of years from now because I need to know whether or not to cancel these reservations.
    If it's only 10 billion years, that means the images from Hubble are already obsolete since it shows 13.5 billion years back in time. Those far off galaxies have already disappeared and it's headed our way. icon_eek.gif

    This also has HUGE implications to deter the quest for traveling faster than the speed of light. It would suck to beam off to another galaxy, just to find out it's not there anymore. icon_lol.gif
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    Feb 20, 2013 3:28 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    theantijock said
    Zinc saidApparently, if the CERN scientists are correct, the discovery that the Higgs Boson has the mass of 126 protons means that our universe is inherently unstable and is prone to "disappear at the speed of light" some time in the next 10 billion years.


    But the article says: "tens of billions of years from now, the universe will disappear"

    So is it within the next 10 billion years or in 10s of billions of years from now because I need to know whether or not to cancel these reservations.
    If it's only 10 billion years, that means the images from Hubble are already obsolete since it shows 13.5 billion years back in time. Those far off galaxies have already disappeared and it's headed our way. icon_eek.gif

    This also has HUGE implications to deter the quest for traveling faster than the speed of light. It would suck to beam off to another galaxy, just to find out it's not there anymore. icon_lol.gif


    Well then I can't believe I bothered to do the dishes earlier. I better have unexpected company drop in within the next nanosecond to have made it worth my while.

    Holy crap, there's someone at the door.

    It's the Universe.
  • Lukehiker

    Posts: 161

    Feb 20, 2013 6:17 AM GMT
    It's actually quite a bit more complicated than the article makes it out to be.

    There is a factor, called "false-vacuum state," which to equate this, is similar to the sudden low pressure created by an explosion; the explosion expands, while the center will eventually implode.

    Now, if the false-vacuum is correct, then, yes, the Universe will suddenly, and dramatically, implode on day; however if its not correct, the implosion will never occur. The magic number to all this is in the mass of 126 B Electron volts(supposed weight of the HBP); which can be distributed to estimate the energy potential of the universe.

    What this means is:
    In a False-vacuum universe, the energy is insufficient to continue to expansion and will one day be wholly eclipsed by the imploding pressure;
    Or, in a non-false-vacuum universe, the energy is simply a constituent of the overall force, with no counter-force gradually overcoming it.

    Honestly I am in the camp of the HBP being just another part of the particle zoo; important to a degree, sure, but not completely game changing. I subscribe to the evolution of the science and out understanding; not the defeatist/absolutist approach of many of the HBP crowd.
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    Feb 20, 2013 6:18 AM GMT
    theantijock said
    Zinc saidApparently, if the CERN scientists are correct, the discovery that the Higgs Boson has the mass of 126 protons means that our universe is inherently unstable and is prone to "disappear at the speed of light" some time in the next 10 billion years.


    But the article says: "tens of billions of years from now, the universe will disappear"

    So is it within the next 10 billion years or in 10s of billions of years from now because I need to know whether or not to cancel these reservations.


    They were just trying to make you feel better. It could happen at any second. In fact, it might have already happened and the event horizon is only just now ge
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    Feb 20, 2013 9:05 AM GMT
    mindgarden said
    theantijock said
    Zinc saidApparently, if the CERN scientists are correct, the discovery that the Higgs Boson has the mass of 126 protons means that our universe is inherently unstable and is prone to "disappear at the speed of light" some time in the next 10 billion years.


    But the article says: "tens of billions of years from now, the universe will disappear"

    So is it within the next 10 billion years or in 10s of billions of years from now because I need to know whether or not to cancel these reservations.


    They were just trying to make you feel better. It could happen at any second. In fact, it might have already happened and the event horizon is only just now ge


    I don't know what ge is, google earth? So I googled event horizon. You're right. It's already in Fort Myers.

    eventhorizon_zps67e75aa1.jpg

    And just as I have plans to go boating with friends in Sarasota. I'm gonna be headed right into it. Hopefully there will be a lot of dolphins playing with us. They will save us. They're very helpful. So long and thanx for the fish.
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    Feb 20, 2013 9:05 AM GMT
    Shawnathan saidHave my table with a view reserved already.


    The+Restaurant+at+the+End+of+The+Univers
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    Feb 21, 2013 5:35 AM GMT
    Would you like to meet the meat?
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    Feb 25, 2013 2:18 AM GMT
    notadumbjock saidtold them 2 let me know when they find the shadow Higgs Boson. only then will we get accurate figures.


    Didn't they accidentally trip over this one when they found the first one? I think the data was inconsistent but fairly strong to suggest it's existence...
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    Feb 25, 2013 2:23 AM GMT
    Lukehiker saidIt's actually quite a bit more complicated than the article makes it out to be.

    There is a factor, called "false-vacuum state," which to equate this, is similar to the sudden low pressure created by an explosion; the explosion expands, while the center will eventually implode.

    Now, if the false-vacuum is correct, then, yes, the Universe will suddenly, and dramatically, implode on day; however if its not correct, the implosion will never occur. The magic number to all this is in the mass of 126 B Electron volts(supposed weight of the HBP); which can be distributed to estimate the energy potential of the universe.

    What this means is:
    In a False-vacuum universe, the energy is insufficient to continue to expansion and will one day be wholly eclipsed by the imploding pressure;
    Or, in a non-false-vacuum universe, the energy is simply a constituent of the overall force, with no counter-force gradually overcoming it.

    Honestly I am in the camp of the HBP being just another part of the particle zoo; important to a degree, sure, but not completely game changing. I subscribe to the evolution of the science and out understanding; not the defeatist/absolutist approach of many of the HBP crowd.
    .


    So, it is possible that the Multiverse will collapse in on itself by implosion...then it will explode again in an event we should call, oh, I don't know, how about The Big Bang?

    Doesn't Buddhism say, "this has all happened before and it will again"?

    At least I know Battlestar Galactica does...
  • Lukehiker

    Posts: 161

    Feb 25, 2013 5:27 AM GMT
    shockandAWD said
    Lukehiker saidIt's actually quite a bit more complicated than the article makes it out to be.

    There is a factor, called "false-vacuum state," which to equate this, is similar to the sudden low pressure created by an explosion; the explosion expands, while the center will eventually implode.

    Now, if the false-vacuum is correct, then, yes, the Universe will suddenly, and dramatically, implode on day; however if its not correct, the implosion will never occur. The magic number to all this is in the mass of 126 B Electron volts(supposed weight of the HBP); which can be distributed to estimate the energy potential of the universe.

    What this means is:
    In a False-vacuum universe, the energy is insufficient to continue to expansion and will one day be wholly eclipsed by the imploding pressure;
    Or, in a non-false-vacuum universe, the energy is simply a constituent of the overall force, with no counter-force gradually overcoming it.

    Honestly I am in the camp of the HBP being just another part of the particle zoo; important to a degree, sure, but not completely game changing. I subscribe to the evolution of the science and out understanding; not the defeatist/absolutist approach of many of the HBP crowd.
    .


    So, it is possible that the Multiverse will collapse in on itself by implosion...then it will explode again in an event we should call, oh, I don't know, how about The Big Bang?

    Doesn't Buddhism say, "this has all happened before and it will again"?

    At least I know Battlestar Galactica does...


    Possible; but all evidence suggests its unlikely.

    And be careful how you use the Multiverse term; current theoretical physics suggests there may be two incarnations thereof: one is geometric, and hence there may be trillions of other universes just outside the edge of ours; the other is overlapping universes, each created by every possibility and action(this is the one where anything can happen).
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    Feb 25, 2013 5:39 AM GMT
    so is this getting me out of work tomorrow or what?
  • Lukehiker

    Posts: 161

    Feb 25, 2013 6:04 AM GMT
    Ariodante saidso is this getting me out of work tomorrow or what?


    Sure, I can get you a black hole to the alternate universe of your choice:
    Evil Twin universe or Apes in charge universe?

    Just press the black Easy Button.
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    Feb 25, 2013 7:32 AM GMT
    I just hope that when the edge of the collapsing universe arrives, it throws back it's fierce-ass hair and says, "Hey gurl."

    Before it kills us all.

    Obvi the universe is a feisty gay man. Duh.
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    Feb 25, 2013 7:44 AM GMT
    mindgarden said
    theantijock said
    Zinc saidApparently, if the CERN scientists are correct, the discovery that the Higgs Boson has the mass of 126 protons means that our universe is inherently unstable and is prone to "disappear at the speed of light" some time in the next 10 billion years.


    But the article says: "tens of billions of years from now, the universe will disappear"

    So is it within the next 10 billion years or in 10s of billions of years from now because I need to know whether or not to cancel these reservations.


    They were just trying to make you feel better. It could happen at any second. In fact, it might have already happened and the event horizon is only just now ge


    Lol! Very clever. Best post on RJ in a while. and good ni
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    Feb 25, 2013 7:47 AM GMT
    Lukehiker said
    Ariodante saidso is this getting me out of work tomorrow or what?


    Sure, I can get you a black hole to the alternate universe of your choice:
    Evil Twin universe or Apes in charge universe?

    Just press the black Easy Button.


    I want that one in Sliders where there were these giant bunny rabbits but they had razor sharp teeth.
  • Lukehiker

    Posts: 161

    Feb 25, 2013 8:43 PM GMT
    Ariodante said
    Lukehiker said
    Ariodante saidso is this getting me out of work tomorrow or what?


    Sure, I can get you a black hole to the alternate universe of your choice:
    Evil Twin universe or Apes in charge universe?

    Just press the black Easy Button.


    I want that one in Sliders where there were these giant bunny rabbits but they had razor sharp teeth.


    You sure you wouldn't prefer the Everyone Must be Happy universe? You know, where everyone is drugged until they are happy as can be?
  • Zinc

    Posts: 197

    Feb 25, 2013 8:44 PM GMT
    Lukehiker said
    Ariodante said
    Lukehiker said
    Ariodante saidso is this getting me out of work tomorrow or what?


    Sure, I can get you a black hole to the alternate universe of your choice:
    Evil Twin universe or Apes in charge universe?

    Just press the black Easy Button.


    I want that one in Sliders where there were these giant bunny rabbits but they had razor sharp teeth.


    You sure you wouldn't prefer the Everyone Must be Happy universe? You know, where everyone is drugged until they are happy as can be?


    Which circle of hell is that again?
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    Feb 25, 2013 8:55 PM GMT
    theantijock said
    Shawnathan saidHave my table with a view reserved already.


    The+Restaurant+at+the+End+of+The+Univers


    The Higgs Boson really is the Deep Thought computer from Hitchhiker's Guide, right?