When pop culture refferences clash with academic ones

  • Delivis

    Posts: 2332

    Oct 06, 2008 11:05 AM GMT
    Is it just me or...

    is anyone else not able to read "<3" as "heart" or "love". I always first read it as "less than three". Surely the mathemeticians out there can relate!

    You know that song "No Air"? They pronounce air like "ayer", i keep thinking of te philosopher A.J. Ayer every time the chorus comes up. Kind of makes the song more meaningful actually.

    Or anyone one of the many words that people use like "peeps" without knowing it is an actual word. It has nothing to do with 'friends' or 'people', either. Not knocking its new use really, just saying my brain always thinks of the old use first...icon_smile.gif

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/peep


    Anyone else have their own examples of things they reactively/instinctively read one particular when that thing, in colloquial speach, is meant as something totally different?


    P.S. made a typo in the title and i can't edit to correct it, bleh!
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    Oct 06, 2008 1:15 PM GMT
    Your first general exposure to a word or pronunciation is likely to be the common accepted use for it.
    The more formalized, rigorous, or thorough your education is, the more likely you are to use the correct form, and also understand colloquial uses as well.

    I too, read <3 as less than three the first time I saw it, but having recognized that there are lots of txt msg [re: text message] acronyms and symbols like the emoticons, I quickly made the assessment based on context what it was. It's annoying at times that these kinds of message methods lead to brief meassages. The major drawback is that they are highly prone to interpretation due to the seeming lack of ability to clarify a point, or make a succinct statement. Of course, I still maintain the adage: "Nothing is so simple that it cannot be misunderstood."

    A old joke by a friend of mine, who's a comic:
    Upon arriving at work, the boss' secretary says to me, "You know it's 8:35"
    "Yes"
    "Well, we start here at 8:30"
    "So your saying I'm fat?!"
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    Oct 06, 2008 1:41 PM GMT
    Delivis saidYou know that song "No Air"? They pronounce air like "ayer", i keep thinking of te philosopher A.J. Ayer every time the chorus comes up. Kind of makes the song more meaningful actually.
    !


    If you were a Spanish speaker you would read No Ayer as No Yesterday and immediately a time warp would come to mind.
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    Oct 06, 2008 1:42 PM GMT
    bgcat57 said

    A old joke by a friend of mine, who's a comic:
    Upon arriving at work, the boss' secretary says to me, "You know it's 8:35"
    "Yes"
    "Well, we start here at 8:30"
    "So your saying I'm fat?!"


    I don't get it.
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    Oct 06, 2008 2:03 PM GMT
    This happens to people who work with a specialized professional vocabulary, apart from the everyday vocabulary used in common speech. Academicians aren't the only ones who experience this.

    This also applies to the iconography you cite, and in both cases it's usually a matter of context. Reading something involving mathematics I see <3 as "less than 3." Reading a non-mathematical online blog I see "love" (or an ice cream cone if I'm hungry).

    On a sillier level, a couple of weeks ago I MC'ed a performance by a gay chorus to which I belong. They were joined onstage by a local band consisting of gay musicians, about whom my script had me saying to the audience:

    "Our chorus has been playing with their members for many years."

    Now the audience was going to be largely GLBT, and I didn't want to take the chance that at least some of them would hear those words as a sexually-focused gay man might, and laugh. The script's author was the choral conductor, and he'd been focused on the musical meaning of those words alone, oblivious to any sexual overtones.

    I had some latitude in the script, so I changed it to something less ambiguous: "We've been performing with them for many years," which also read a lot smoother from the stage.
  • Delivis

    Posts: 2332

    Oct 06, 2008 4:25 PM GMT
    alexander7 said
    Delivis saidYou know that song "No Air"? They pronounce air like "ayer", i keep thinking of te philosopher A.J. Ayer every time the chorus comes up. Kind of makes the song more meaningful actually.
    !


    If you were a Spanish speaker you would read No Ayer as No Yesterday and immediately a time warp would come to mind.


    Oh don't even get me started on situations where i am thinking in other languages, hehe.
  • Delivis

    Posts: 2332

    Oct 06, 2008 4:33 PM GMT
    Oh i just remembered another example.

    An english teacher in my first year was making a point about colloquializations and wrote on the board:

    L8R and asked "who doesnt know what this means?" (implying that everyone does, which was part of some grander point which i dont remember)

    I was the only one who did not know (i really did know, i was just thinking in a differnt mode). I was thinking entirely in terms of an equation - L multiplied by 8 multiplied by R. I did not recognize the formula from physics, from chemistry, from anywhere! I slapped myself on the forehead (though not loudly) when i found out what she meant.
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    Oct 06, 2008 5:03 PM GMT
    When people say 'yo, peeps!' I always look around in confusion, expecting to see Sammy Pepys. Then I remember I'm not in London, and it's not the seventeenth century.

    And maybe its just indicative of my general frame of mind, but I always see the <3 thing as a scrotum.
  • 2theTEE

    Posts: 637

    Oct 06, 2008 5:12 PM GMT
    }8=====D ~~~~

    ^^^

    That is a wildebeest drooling but it is always mistaken for something else; I have no idea why.
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    Oct 06, 2008 5:15 PM GMT
    I don't think I ever thought <3 in text just meant less than 3 seeing as how that wouldn't always fit but for a while I wasn't sure and kept wondering why the fuck people were saying I " side ways ice cream cone" you.

    I suppose this clash is generational no matter what generation. There was a time when Gay for most meant something completely different. It would be a kick to have that generation walking around now constantly hearing people talk about the gays and them wondering... "Why so much anger over happy people?" icon_smile.gif
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    Oct 06, 2008 6:36 PM GMT
    zdrew saidWhen people say 'yo, peeps!' I always look around in confusion, expecting to see Sammy Pepys. Then I remember I'm not in London, and it's not the seventeenth century.

    And maybe its just indicative of my general frame of mind, but I always see the <3 thing as a scrotum.


    Samuel Pepys! Now there's a scholarly reference I can admire! But then I often spend much of my time in the Seventeenth Century.

    I still see <3 as an ice cream cone. Although the parallels with a scrotum are undeniable: roundish things you lick with your tongue? Tempty things you might drip a tasty topping on? Velvety things you swirl around in your mouth? STOP! STOP!
  • Musclebucket

    Posts: 157

    Oct 06, 2008 6:42 PM GMT
    Everybody knows <3 is a pair of buttocks speeding leftward
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    Oct 06, 2008 6:46 PM GMT
    JuhJuhJEFF said}8=====D ~~~~

    ^^^

    That is a wildebeest drooling but it is always mistaken for something else; I have no idea why.


    No, you're right, it does look like a wild beast drooling to me, too! And my job is to tame it, after a long & hard struggle! LOL!!!
  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    Oct 06, 2008 6:53 PM GMT
    Delivis,

    Where have you been hiding? Enjoying your posts. And your new pics. Keep it up.

    Eric
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    Oct 06, 2008 6:59 PM GMT
    Language is not an absolute. the use of language is very dynamic and in constant change. the "rules" of the language (like grammar) are really just descriptive tools that reflect how the language is at a certain point in time. but language is not easily contained in boxes like that and new generations will always find new and creative ways to express themselves.
    Older people have always criticized younger peoples' language for not being proper or correct, but "correct" language 100 years ago wasn't correct 500 years ago. I mean it's quite common that younger people want to distance themselves from older generations, and a different use of language, like slang, can be used to emphasize your belonging to a certain group (age, ethnicity, social). So if a new expression or new use of an existing word is popular enough (to exceed mere slang) it will eventually be assimilated as a part of "correct" language use, like gay meaning homosexual (and the original meaning sometimes even disappearing).
    Slang is mostly what worries the old conservatives, that the language is falling apart, but it's usually only the most clever or fitting expressions that live on, the rest will fade out eventually... like, no one uses slang from the 60's or 70's much today except Austin Powers.

    Of course I'm not for total anarchy, because we need some common ground to understand each other. I don't always understand new slang or txt abbr. but I'm fascinated by the creativity.
    Being an old person icon_lol.gif (31) who's interested in language though, I do sometimes feel sad about some unconventional use of words or expressions icon_evil.gif especially if they are born out of total ignorance.... Oh, and I really don't like that song..." No Ayer" icon_razz.gif
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    Oct 06, 2008 9:07 PM GMT
    judoguy said no one uses slang from the 60's or 70's much today except Austin Powers.


    But '30s slang is still the cat's pajamas.

    I get fairly annoyed by the "=" being used so much. Can't we just use the word "is"? To say "chips and salsa = awesome" as an example just rubs me the wrong way. I don't know, it's personal preference, mind=blown.

  • Hagan_F

    Posts: 210

    Oct 06, 2008 9:11 PM GMT
    I can't help but think of yellow, chick-shaped marshmellow treats whenever I hear someone using the word "peeps".
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    Oct 06, 2008 9:13 PM GMT
    Hagan_F saidI can't help but think of yellow, chick-shaped marshmellow treats whenever I hear someone using the word "peeps".

    I want it to be Easter, now.
  • 2theTEE

    Posts: 637

    Oct 06, 2008 9:20 PM GMT
    Red_Vespa said
    JuhJuhJEFF said}8=====D ~~~~

    ^^^

    That is a wildebeest drooling but it is always mistaken for something else; I have no idea why.


    No, you're right, it does look like a wild beast drooling to me, too! And my job is to tame it, after a long & hard struggle! LOL!!!


    Photobucket

    A wildebeest, aka gnu. They can put up a pretty good fight.
  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    Oct 06, 2008 9:26 PM GMT
    I gnu you were funny Jeff!
  • Musclebucket

    Posts: 157

    Oct 06, 2008 9:31 PM GMT
    Pinny where have you been? Under a rock? They make Peeps for Halloween now. Orange pumpkins and white ghosts; also black cats and bats I think.
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    Oct 06, 2008 9:39 PM GMT
    JuhJuhJEFF said
    Red_Vespa said
    JuhJuhJEFF said}8=====D ~~~~

    ^^^

    That is a wildebeest drooling but it is always mistaken for something else; I have no idea why.


    No, you're right, it does look like a wild beast drooling to me, too! And my job is to tame it, after a long & hard struggle! LOL!!!


    Photobucket

    A wildebeest, aka gnu. They can put up a pretty good fight.


    So can the other wild beast I was thinking of! But once you get 'em around the throat and make 'em cough up, it takes the fight right out of 'em.
  • Delivis

    Posts: 2332

    Oct 07, 2008 1:01 AM GMT
    EricLA saidDelivis,

    Where have you been hiding? Enjoying your posts. And your new pics. Keep it up.

    Eric


    Thanks. I could make many great meaningful threads, but that would require me not procrastinating. I'll get around to it eventually..icon_smile.gif
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    Oct 07, 2008 1:44 AM GMT
    Teen much?
    --------------------------------------

    Michael Adams: Slayer Slang

    But the show [Buffy the Vampire Slayer] does more than merely capture current teen slang; rather, it is endlessly, if unevenly, inventive. Thus Buffy, only tentatively supporting the romance budding between Xander and Cordelia, assures them, "I’m glad that you guys are getting along, almost really." Vampires, apparently cast into fashion Limbo on the day they become undead, are often marked by their unstylish wardrobes. "Look at his jacket," says Buffy of one them. "It’s dated?" asks Giles, to which Buffy responds, "It’s carbon-dated." When Cordelia dumps him, Xander asks a young, not awfully proficient witch to cast a love spell on Cordelia; when it backfires and affects everyone BUT Cordelia, he muses to Giles, "Every woman in Sunnydale wants to make me her cuddle-monkey."

    Most of us are lucky if we’re carefree, but the Slayer thinks in grander terms: "I don’t have a destiny," she retorts, when reminded of her cosmic role, "I’m destiny-free." When bitten by his infant nephew, Oz is shocked to learn that he belongs to a family of werewolves: "It’s not every day you find out you’re a werewolf," he explains, "That’s fairly freaksome." In spite of the lunar cycle, Oz’s popularity, his social position, is intact, but not everyone in high school is so lucky, as Cordelia, ever alert on such matters, points out: "Doesn’t Owen realize he’s hitting a major backspace by hanging out with that loser?" Teens map their own linguistic territory, as opposed to their parents’, with slang, and sometimes "improve" earlier slang to stake their own generation’s claim. Cordelia complains to a petulant Buffy, "Whatever is causing the Joan Collins ’tude, deal with it. Embrace the pain, spank your inner moppet, whatever, but get over it." Cordelia’s coinage puts her divorced parents’ pop-psychological jargon in its place.

    Evidence already quoted proves that the English language often occupies the writers’ minds, and thus it often occupies the characters’ minds, as well. Buffy the Vampire Slayer is an especially language-conscious television show. The characters are backhanded definers ("Man, that’s like, I don’t know, that’s moxie, or something."); bemused grammarians (in one episode, Willow struggles to determine whether one should say "slayed" or "slew"), amateur etymologists (""The whole nine yards"–what does it mean? This is going to bother me all day."); or self-conscious stylists ("Again, so many words. Couldn’t we just say, "We be in trouble? . . . Gone." Notice the economy of phrasing: "Gone." Simple, direct."), whatever the situation demands. "Apparently Buffy has decided that what’s wrong with the English language is all those pesky words," Xander remarks in one episode.

    But the problem may not be the absolute number of words so much as the plethora of inadequately expressive ones.
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    Oct 07, 2008 1:46 AM GMT
    The above is where pop culture language stylists and academia meet.

    Loves it.