This Sweetener Is Far Worse Than High Fructose Corn Syrup

  • metta

    Posts: 39144

    Feb 23, 2013 2:38 AM GMT
    This Sweetener Is Far Worse Than High Fructose Corn Syrup

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-mercola/agave-this-sweetener-is-f_b_537936.html


    The "Is Agave Bad For You" Fallacy

    http://www.braintoniq.com/is-agave-bad-for-you-fallacy.php

    You Ask, I Answer: Agave Is The New Enemy?
    http://www.wellsphere.com/healthy-eating-article/you-ask-i-answer-agave-is-the-new-enemy/1082273


    Why I Use Agave Nectar: An Examination of Agave Facts and Fiction http://betterworldcookies.blogspot.com/2010/06/why-i-use-agave-nectar-examination-of.html
  • metta

    Posts: 39144

    Feb 23, 2013 2:39 AM GMT
    as per Ridler's request, I have moved this to food. icon_smile.gif

    The alternative, Stevia tastes is horrible to me.

    I think that I will try and stick with honey, maple syrup, and fruit juices as sweeteners. icon_smile.gif

    I do have some foods with ghee as well when I have Indian food.
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    Feb 23, 2013 4:08 AM GMT
    Umm... I hope you realize that this guy is a complete and utter crackpot. Reposting his garbage un-ironically could really be harmful.
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    Feb 23, 2013 4:11 AM GMT
    This is a man who says HIV and AIDS are not related in any way. He believes AIDS is a psychological condition. He is a laughing stock of the medical community, and takes advantage of scared and confused people. Please research what he believes in, he is a quack, who should have lost his license years ago.
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    Feb 23, 2013 4:20 AM GMT
    How can there be a healthier sugary syrup alternative to sugary syrup?

    Our brains are designed to crave it, but our bodies are probably not able to process it in the quantities we consume.

    Which of the artificial sweeteners are safe?

    Is it not possible that they could disturb and confuse digestion by mimicking the taste of sugar?

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    Feb 23, 2013 4:27 AM GMT
    Fortis saidHow can there be a healthier sugary syrup alternative to sugary syrup?

    Our brains are designed to crave it, but our bodies are probably not able to process it in the quantities we consume.

    Which of the artificial sweeteners are safe?

    Is it not possible that they could disturb and confuse digestion by mimicking the taste of sugar?



    There are different kinds of artificial sweeteners. Most of them work because they are hundreds or thousands of times sweeter than sugars. So you only have to use a tiny amount for the same effect. There are no calories, and there is basically no effect on metabolism, because there's hardly anything there.

    However, it's probably better just to not sweeten things that don't need to be sweet.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Feb 23, 2013 4:27 AM GMT
    Fortis saidHow can there be a healthier sugary syrup alternative to sugary syrup?

    Our brains are designed to crave it, but our bodies are probably not able to process it in the quantities we consume.

    Which of the artificial sweeteners are safe?

    Is it not possible that they could disturb and confuse digestion by mimicking the taste of sugar?



    Yes. Artificial sweeteners confuse the appetite response. They prepare the body for a carb intake that never comes, and can wreak havoc on blood sugar. It's why it isn't recommended for non-diabetics to use artificial sweeteners, at least not consistently.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Feb 23, 2013 4:28 AM GMT
    So what is the point? That x sweetener is worse is some way than y sweetener, that Mercola is a crackpot, or something else?

    Can't speak to Mercola, other than that I think such articles speak for themselves.

    As to agave nectar, or stevia, or sugar, or HFCS or honey, or sorghum, or whatever, carbs is carbs. There is just no getting around it.

    Here endeth the screeding.
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    Feb 23, 2013 4:28 AM GMT
    Stevia took getting used to but I'm ok with it now. The good thing about it is no, it doesn't taste AWESOME, so I get into situations of meh, I'd rather just get used to this not being as sweet to begin with.
  • Zinc

    Posts: 197

    Feb 23, 2013 4:33 AM GMT
    Can we ruin maple syrup now too? make it a two for one thread.
  • mybud

    Posts: 11837

    Feb 23, 2013 4:42 AM GMT
    All of this is a crock of shit...I'll continue with my splenda...
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    Feb 23, 2013 4:46 AM GMT
    Bee vomit works just fine for me.
  • Lukehiker

    Posts: 161

    Feb 23, 2013 5:47 AM GMT
    I'm an organic honey person myself.

    HFC's and fake stuff like Splenda have shown the possibility to create digestive issues.

    My family has a history of over sensitivity to certain sugars and proteins; mine is to Soy, and I have an uncle that will have serious problems with Fructose. Back in 95' he didn't know about the allergy, spent a day with his wife and son at a Kings Island, eating candy and drinking soda all over the place; next morning my aunt woke up to him turning blue. That one day killed nearly ten feet of his small intestine. I'm lucky I just get hives.

    The human body evolved to handle certain proteins and sugars that are commonly found naturally. Anything outside that range can cause problems.
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    Feb 23, 2013 6:00 AM GMT
    Lukehiker saidI'm an organic honey person myself.

    HFC's and fake stuff like Splenda have shown the possibility to create digestive issues.

    My family has a history of over sensitivity to certain sugars and proteins; mine is to Soy, and I have an uncle that will have serious problems with Fructose. Back in 95' he didn't know about the allergy, spent a day with his wife and son at a Kings Island, eating candy and drinking soda all over the place; next morning my aunt woke up to him turning blue. That one day killed nearly ten feet of his small intestine. I'm lucky I just get hives.

    The human body evolved to handle certain proteins and sugars that are commonly found naturally. Anything outside that range can cause problems.


    Don't know why I bother, but that's nonsense. HFC has exactly the same sweeteners that honey does. "Organic Honey" is full of all kinds of stuff... MOSTLY it's fructose and wax, but also contains every poison in the countryside, from poison oak toxin to digitalis.

    So, your Uncle had never eaten any fruit or juice, ever, before this one binge day?
  • Lukehiker

    Posts: 161

    Feb 23, 2013 6:09 AM GMT
    mindgarden said
    Lukehiker saidI'm an organic honey person myself.

    HFC's and fake stuff like Splenda have shown the possibility to create digestive issues.

    My family has a history of over sensitivity to certain sugars and proteins; mine is to Soy, and I have an uncle that will have serious problems with Fructose. Back in 95' he didn't know about the allergy, spent a day with his wife and son at a Kings Island, eating candy and drinking soda all over the place; next morning my aunt woke up to him turning blue. That one day killed nearly ten feet of his small intestine. I'm lucky I just get hives.

    The human body evolved to handle certain proteins and sugars that are commonly found naturally. Anything outside that range can cause problems.


    Don't know why I bother, but that's nonsense. HFC has exactly the same sweeteners that honey does. "Organic Honey" is full of all kinds of stuff... MOSTLY it's fructose and wax, but also contains every poison in the countryside, from poison oak toxin to digitalis.

    So, your Uncle had never eaten any fruit or juice, ever, before this one binge day?


    I think you misunderstood. It's the amount that does it; not merely being present. He had eaten all kinds of sugary stuff in his life, but a day of eating items that contained large amounts of HFC, and little else, resulted in a severe imbalance, and hence the damage to his intestines.

    I know my allergy better than his, but they are essentially the same:
    I can eat an energy bar with soy in it fine; but if I try a tofu dog, or a glass of soy milk, the protein floods my bloodstream and causes a severe histamine reaction: Hives. I have it approximated to about an ounce is enough to trigger my allergy.

    In my uncle's case, it may be an ounce that does it, or 10 ounces, but the reaction is the same as a overdose on the substance; with us, we are simply hyper sensitive to it.
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    Feb 23, 2013 6:16 AM GMT
    Medjai said
    Fortis saidHow can there be a healthier sugary syrup alternative to sugary syrup?

    Our brains are designed to crave it, but our bodies are probably not able to process it in the quantities we consume.

    Which of the artificial sweeteners are safe?

    Is it not possible that they could disturb and confuse digestion by mimicking the taste of sugar?



    Yes. Artificial sweeteners confuse the appetite response. They prepare the body for a carb intake that never comes, and can wreak havoc on blood sugar. It's why it isn't recommended for non-diabetics to use artificial sweeteners, at least not consistently.



    Please explain, this is the opposite of what I've read. icon_question.gif
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Feb 23, 2013 6:23 AM GMT
    uoft23 saidPlease explain, this is the opposite of what I've read. icon_question.gif


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9884024
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18556090

    The only artificial sweetener not shown to result in an insulin spike is, oddly, aspartame.
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    Feb 23, 2013 6:28 AM GMT
    I looked at the source materials that are unrelated to Mercola. I'm investigating coconut palm sugar, which tastes a little like light brown sugar, and there are some new artificial sweeteners coming down the pike, too. I for one LOVE sweets, so I need some way to curb / satiate that need regularly. Splenda is pretty good, but some people are uncomfortable with the chlorine used in processing. I use so little of it that I don't have a problem with that aspect of it.

    Thanks to the OP!
  • Lukehiker

    Posts: 161

    Feb 23, 2013 6:33 AM GMT
    JeffSGV saidI looked at the source materials that are unrelated to Mercola. I'm investigating coconut palm sugar, which tastes a little like light brown sugar, and there are some new artificial sweeteners coming down the pike, too. I for one LOVE sweets, so I need some way to curb / satiate that need regularly. Splenda is pretty good, but some people are uncomfortable with the chlorine used in processing. I use so little of it that I don't have a problem with that aspect of it.

    Thanks to the OP!


    I do homemade honey roasted peanuts.

    4 cups unsalted, unroasted peanuts
    1/2 cup honey

    Mix peanuts and honey, roast at 350 for 20 min.
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    Feb 23, 2013 6:34 AM GMT
    Medjai said
    uoft23 saidPlease explain, this is the opposite of what I've read. icon_question.gif


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9884024
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18556090

    The only artificial sweetener not shown to result in an insulin spike is, oddly, aspartame.


    Thats interesting. I need to read more about that. I just recently gave up artificial sweeteners but for a different reason.

    Most of the studies I had read when I started using them indicated little significant change in insulin response but that 2nd one you linked reports a "significant" increase. That's a little disturbing.
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    Feb 23, 2013 6:52 AM GMT
    You can't read much into phrases from PubMed abstracts. (And for that matter, you can't take PubMed abstracts at face value. They are just advertisements to get you to read the paper.) "Significant" could mean anything from "statistically significant at the P= .05 level" to, "the author thinks it's neat!" And "statistically significant" does not mean "practically significant." There could be a statistically significant 0.1% difference that doesn't mean squat in the real world.

    I have no idea about these particular papers. I'm just remembering a recent post about "bro science" and the nonsense that gets bantered around on bb.c

    And the OP is complete nonsense. icon_razz.gif
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    Feb 23, 2013 6:58 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidYou can't read much into phrases from PubMed abstracts. (And for that matter, you can't take PubMed abstracts at face value. They are just advertisements to get you to read the paper.) "Significant" could mean anything from "statistically significant at the P= .05 level" to, "the author thinks it's neat!" And "statistically significant" does not mean "practically significant." There could be a statistically significant 0.1% difference that doesn't mean squat in the real world.

    I have no idea about these particular papers. I'm just remembering a recent post about "bro science" and the nonsense that gets bantered around on bb.c

    And the OP is complete nonsense. icon_razz.gif


    Ya, I'm not saying I'm ready to believe it 100%, but the tagging of saccharin along with actual sucrose and "signficant" insulin increases is definitely worth reading about even if it only turns out to be misleading.
  • ThatSwimmerGu...

    Posts: 3755

    Feb 23, 2013 7:02 AM GMT
    Reminds me I need to do my 10 page essay over the harmful effects of artificial sweeteners.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Feb 23, 2013 7:50 AM GMT
    uoft23 said
    mindgarden saidYou can't read much into phrases from PubMed abstracts. (And for that matter, you can't take PubMed abstracts at face value. They are just advertisements to get you to read the paper.) "Significant" could mean anything from "statistically significant at the P= .05 level" to, "the author thinks it's neat!" And "statistically significant" does not mean "practically significant." There could be a statistically significant 0.1% difference that doesn't mean squat in the real world.

    I have no idea about these particular papers. I'm just remembering a recent post about "bro science" and the nonsense that gets bantered around on bb.c

    And the OP is complete nonsense. icon_razz.gif


    Ya, I'm not saying I'm ready to believe it 100%, but the tagging of saccharin along with actual sucrose and "signficant" insulin increases is definitely worth reading about even if it only turns out to be misleading.


    One of the benefits of being a student s that I can access the full article for free.

    The artificial sweeteners actually elicited a higher insulin response than sucrose. Artificial sweeteners increased serum insulin by 12% on average, whereas sucrose increased it by 10%. This is based on taste alone, with no consumption occurring.
  • wild_sky360

    Posts: 1492

    Feb 23, 2013 7:56 AM GMT
    Medjai said
    uoft23 saidPlease explain, this is the opposite of what I've read. icon_question.gif


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9884024
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18556090

    The only artificial sweetener not shown to result in an insulin spike is, oddly, aspartame.


    Well that's good to know because I'm currently addicted. I know how awful it's supposed to be but I like the feeling in the morning. I've kicked it a few times by titrating down phenalalynine, which was only partially helpful.

    Do you think there is another component, or compound action that makes it addictive?