Would you take Fitness advice from a Fat Ass?

  • sportsjockla

    Posts: 498

    Feb 25, 2013 6:35 PM GMT
    I'm a Personal Trainer and one of my clients massage therapist who doesn't work out started giving my client REALLY bad fitness advice that would've caused him injury. The massage therapist had a Midwest woman's body. Thin upper body, HUGE ASS! Doesn't work out. They guy was one of those people like a used car salesmen. He can sell you anything. To me, it's like taking driving safety course from a drunk driver! Would you listen to somebody like this?
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    Feb 26, 2013 1:09 AM GMT
    I've heard good advice given by out-of-shape trainers, and horrible advice given by super-fit ones. Plus, someone told me this story about not judging books by their cover, and it resonated.
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    Feb 26, 2013 1:13 AM GMT
    At the 24 Hr. Fitness I worked out the trainer used to smoke outside the door and you could smell when he or one of the onther personal trainer would smuggle hamburgers and french fries in.
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    Feb 26, 2013 1:14 AM GMT
    Aristoshark saidWhy would anyone go to a personal trainer who referred to the less physically fit as "fat ass"?

    QFT^ Ouch, This.
  • nic_m3

    Posts: 123

    Feb 26, 2013 1:14 AM GMT
    I can see your point but I would base my decision solely on the fact of their weight, But I do agree that It's probably not good for business. If the therapist had a proven track record from other clients or maybe she herself used to be even bigger than before, I might take the advice.

    Look at it this way, I'm small 170 6'2" so you might not take hardgain advice from me but maybe if you knew that oct 25th I was 139lbs you might decide to listen after-all.
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Feb 26, 2013 1:18 AM GMT
    Aristoshark saidWhy would anyone go to a personal trainer who referred to the less physically fit as "fat ass"?


    My thoughts exactly.

    Not much professionalism there.
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    Feb 26, 2013 1:35 AM GMT
    themachine saidI've heard good advice given by out-of-shape trainers, and horrible advice given by super-fit ones. Plus, someone told me this story about not judging books by their cover, and it resonated.


    Lol. +1 on this.


    And mean name-calling aside, it really depends on what area of advice they were seeking from this other person too. If she is a Massage Therapist, wouldn't she have insights into maintaining the well-being of the body that you would not?
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    Feb 26, 2013 2:46 AM GMT
    Aristoshark saidWhy would anyone go to a personal trainer who referred to the less physically fit as "fat ass"?


    +1
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    Feb 26, 2013 2:47 AM GMT
    Aristoshark saidWhy would anyone go to a personal trainer who referred to the less physically fit as "fat ass"?
    ditto that
  • jeggey

    Posts: 50

    Feb 26, 2013 2:49 AM GMT
    i'm a trainer and one of the smartest trainer we have is chubby.
  • sportsjockla

    Posts: 498

    Feb 26, 2013 2:51 AM GMT
    themachine saidI've heard good advice given by out-of-shape trainers, and horrible advice given by super-fit ones. Plus, someone told me this story about not judging books by their cover, and it resonated.


    It wasn't just the fact that he was out of shape, he was uninformed and giving dangerous advice. He told another one of my clients by just massaging him, and my client was a doctor, that he had a dislocated shoulder and he shouldn' be working out. My client had Arthritis. A dislocated shoulder he would be crying in pain! HUGE difference.
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    Feb 26, 2013 2:53 AM GMT
    TBH - I might tend to believe the fat ass over the OP. Attitude makes a difference. How you deliver the advice also makes a difference. If I were truly concerned, I would pull the client to the side and explain what that motion would do to his/her body and compare it to alternative moves and what your suggestions might be.

    That way you are being professional and not damaging the credibility of your coworkers at the gym.
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    Feb 26, 2013 3:02 AM GMT
    Yes yes, scold the OP for calling the therapist a fatass... But the basic point is true.

    As a fitness professional, your body is your brand. If you can't take care of you, you'll not be very convincing taking care of someone else.
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    Feb 26, 2013 3:08 AM GMT
    Larkin saidYes yes, scold the OP for calling the therapist a fatass... But the basic point is true.

    As a fitness professional, your body is your brand. If you can't take care of you, you'll not be very convincing taking care of someone else.


    I completely agree with you, but as a business person who wants to take care of your brand, professionalism is still important. That's the point I was making.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Feb 26, 2013 3:12 AM GMT
    I'd take it with a grain of salt, but great advice can come from the strangest of places...

    It's better than the YouTube trainer that my room mate seems to worship.
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    Feb 26, 2013 3:17 AM GMT
    Larkin saidYes yes, scold the OP for calling the therapist a fatass... But the basic point is true.

    As a fitness professional, your body is your brand. If you can't take care of you, you'll not be very convincing taking care of someone else.


    True.. buuuuut all the trainers at my gym are physically fit and promote poor form, which WILL injure their clients..
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    Feb 26, 2013 3:22 AM GMT
    southern89 said
    Larkin saidYes yes, scold the OP for calling the therapist a fatass... But the basic point is true.

    As a fitness professional, your body is your brand. If you can't take care of you, you'll not be very convincing taking care of someone else.


    True.. buuuuut all the trainers at my gym are physically fit and promote poor form, which WILL injure their clients..


    Not saying an unfit trainer is wrong... Just that he will be unconvincing.

    There are plenty of fit idiots as well
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    Feb 26, 2013 3:31 AM GMT
    A lard butt is a lard butt is a lard butt - nothin wrong with the OP callin' it as he sees it... its not like he called him fatass to his face - that wudda been unprofessional
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    Feb 26, 2013 3:32 AM GMT
    On this site I wouldnt expect anything less than douche-nozzles like the OP referring to someone as a fat ass, but I wonder how he would feel if someone asked 'who would take advice from an old ass'....
  • ThatSwimmerGu...

    Posts: 3755

    Feb 26, 2013 3:45 AM GMT
    I know a guy who lost 80lbs so it really depends. He's pretty good looking now.
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    Feb 26, 2013 3:47 AM GMT
    Aristoshark saidWhy would anyone go to a personal trainer who referred to the less physically fit as "fat ass"?


    z220125614.gif
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    Feb 26, 2013 4:07 AM GMT
    sportsjockla saidWould you listen to somebody like this?

    I would listen to someone who has a proven track record of making other people better. Where the person is today isn't nearly as important as how far they've come. And when you look at training and coaching, the ability of the person in question to motivate, inspire, and guide is paramount.

    Bad advice? Bad form? Bad examples? Kick 'em to the curb.

    Sound advice. Excellent form. Steady progress. Encouragement all the way? Think twice before dropping them.

    And to the others, I doubt the OP would have called the guy a fat ass to his face. There is a professional decorum which is seldom observed (even by the finger pointers in this thread) in other threads. Let's cut him some slack and hope that the client(s) receive sound advice and learn good form.
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    Feb 26, 2013 4:10 AM GMT
    So there's Physically Fit and Fat Ass.
    And no in between.
    Ok.
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    Feb 26, 2013 4:19 AM GMT
    Nope. I actually laugh at fat people - in their face - when they try to give fitness advice...unless they can show pictures of when they were in shape.
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    Feb 26, 2013 4:25 AM GMT
    So, regardless of the health and fitness credibility aspects, some of you are saying making fun of people is okay? They just have to be wrong, and you can be the bullies?