Advice on Gaining Weight , Muscle

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    Mar 06, 2013 11:17 AM GMT
    I'm 5"6 139 lbs , and I have a hard time gaining weight fast do you have any advice on what foods to eat what to do workout thank you soo much
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    Mar 06, 2013 5:55 PM GMT
    I used to be exactly like you. 5'7", 130 lbs, 19 years old. It was bad.

    Here's what I would have you do if you were my client:

    Compound movements that involve a lot of musculature (squats, deadlifts, pull ups, standing press, etc.). Don't waste your time with isolation BS like tricep extensions, biceps curls, etc.

    Have a good coach teach you the compound movements I wrote above. Do them right and they will work exactly the way you want. Do them wrong and you'll get injured. CrossFit gyms can be good for this. They can be expensive though, and staffed by idiots, so read up on the coach/owner and make sure he/she has at least 5 years experience.

    Rest 80-90 seconds between sets of 5-8 reps using fairly heavy weights (65-75% of your 1RM).

    Each day, eat at least 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight. For example, I'm 150 lbs, to gain weight I should eat 150 grams of protein per day. Ideally this protein should come from good quality meat--not protein shakes and protein bars (at least at the start of your training, things change as you progress). There's about 7 grams of protein per ounce of meat...so in this example I'd need to eat 21 oz of meat a day (about a pound and a half).

    Don't be a wuss when you're in the gym. Go there to work hard and really work hard. If it takes you two hours, you're probably not doing it right.

    Good luck!

    -Joey

    Source: Exercise Science Undergrad, personal training studio co-owner.
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    Mar 06, 2013 9:49 PM GMT
    It doesn't matter what you say to AC2394, he doesn't listen, he just likes to create troll posts. You will learn. It's started once again.

    Here's his gym experiences

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    Mar 06, 2013 10:23 PM GMT
    __JoeyD___ saidI used to be exactly like you. 5'7", 130 lbs, 19 years old. It was bad.

    Here's what I would have you do if you were my client:

    Compound movements that involve a lot of musculature (squats, deadlifts, pull ups, standing press, etc.). Don't waste your time with isolation BS like tricep extensions, biceps curls, etc.

    Have a good coach teach you the compound movements I wrote above. Do them right and they will work exactly the way you want. Do them wrong and you'll get injured. CrossFit gyms can be good for this. They can be expensive though, and staffed by idiots, so read up on the coach/owner and make sure he/she has at least 5 years experience.

    Rest 80-90 seconds between sets of 5-8 reps using fairly heavy weights (65-75% of your 1RM).

    Each day, eat at least 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight. For example, I'm 150 lbs, to gain weight I should eat 150 grams of protein per day. Ideally this protein should come from good quality meat--not protein shakes and protein bars (at least at the start of your training, things change as you progress). There's about 7 grams of protein per ounce of meat...so in this example I'd need to eat 21 oz of meat a day (about a pound and a half).

    Don't be a wuss when you're in the gym. Go there to work hard and really work hard. If it takes you two hours, you're probably not doing it right.

    Good luck!

    -Joey

    Source: Exercise Science Undergrad, personal training studio co-owner.


    Thanks for the tips, Joey.
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    Mar 07, 2013 12:52 AM GMT
    __JoeyD___ saidI used to be exactly like you. 5'7", 130 lbs, 19 years old. It was bad.

    Here's what I would have you do if you were my client:

    Compound movements that involve a lot of musculature (squats, deadlifts, pull ups, standing press, etc.). Don't waste your time with isolation BS like tricep extensions, biceps curls, etc.

    Have a good coach teach you the compound movements I wrote above. Do them right and they will work exactly the way you want. Do them wrong and you'll get injured. CrossFit gyms can be good for this. They can be expensive though, and staffed by idiots, so read up on the coach/owner and make sure he/she has at least 5 years experience.

    Rest 80-90 seconds between sets of 5-8 reps using fairly heavy weights (65-75% of your 1RM).

    Each day, eat at least 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight. For example, I'm 150 lbs, to gain weight I should eat 150 grams of protein per day. Ideally this protein should come from good quality meat--not protein shakes and protein bars (at least at the start of your training, things change as you progress). There's about 7 grams of protein per ounce of meat...so in this example I'd need to eat 21 oz of meat a day (about a pound and a half).

    Don't be a wuss when you're in the gym. Go there to work hard and really work hard. If it takes you two hours, you're probably not doing it right.

    Good luck!

    -Joey

    Source: Exercise Science Undergrad, personal training studio co-owner.


    Let science help you train smarter:

    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/lifting-2-0-the-new-biology-of-bigger-mucles.html?mcid=facetraining

    Most current science indicates the lower rep ranges are all wrong, especially if you're just learning motor control.

    Study up on whatever your goal is with regard to hypertrophy (I.e., study hypertrophy.)

    If you consume more calories than you expend, you'll gain weight. In particular, complex carbs will be protein sparing, reload, and give you energy to train. Chances are you need more carbs in your diet, or, maybe...more fat. Most folks get enough protein, even if they are lifters, unless they are starving gay guys.....(the advice above about protein is solid).

    Cardio is ESSENTIAL to ANY good wellness plan. Study up on HIIT, and DO IT.

    Many folks with years of "experience" are clueless with regard to the science. You need to research this on your own.

    EAT. If you eat enough, you'll gain. If you can't get the calories in, use weight gainers.

    When I'm training hard, I'll eat 10 meals and over 5500 calories per day, or even more. I'm not training hard, hard, I'll do less, of course. Learn how to count your calories. Download the USDA SRS Food Calculator, and learn how to use it.

    Depending on your cardiovascular fitness, you can circuit train / HIIT train with weights (or interval train) About 96%-98% of your muscle recovery happens in just 45 seconds. I.e., to improve your cardiac threshold, as well as fat burn, and metabolic activation, get through the gym, and onto chow hall, you can circuit train for sarcoplasmic hypertrophy in 45 second intervals. (That's likely the look you're after, anyway, and the fitness you're after.) Note that you have to perform interval training or circuit training at high intensity and at short intervals to also improve your cardiac threshold. Otherwise, do HIIT separately, but, MAKE SURE YOU DO CARDIO in some fashion. HIIT is best, overall, for a long list of reasons that you can research further.