Loyal pals: Blind Labrador retriever helped by tiny terrier - this is very touching

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    Mar 08, 2013 3:32 AM GMT
    http://www.today.com/pets/loyal-pals-blind-labrador-retriever-helped-tiny-terrier-1C8760002

    1C6350895-tdy-130306-guide-dog-blind-01.
  • nic_m3

    Posts: 123

    Mar 08, 2013 8:02 AM GMT
    That's damn cute.
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    Mar 08, 2013 8:10 AM GMT
    so adorable icon_cry.gif
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    Mar 08, 2013 8:20 AM GMT
    Oh my goodness!!!!
    That is sooo adorable I got a little teary.
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    Mar 08, 2013 8:29 AM GMT
    Adorable!
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    Mar 08, 2013 8:46 AM GMT
    Undoubtedly the greatest post I've come across on this site, ever.

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    Mar 08, 2013 8:51 AM GMT
    Awwwww icon_sad.gif
    Such a sad story yet so beautiful..
  • ASHDOD

    Posts: 1057

    Mar 08, 2013 10:43 AM GMT
    this is sweet icon_idea.gif
  • Sportsfan1

    Posts: 479

    Mar 08, 2013 11:49 AM GMT
    This story is truly very touching and inspirational. Dogs have the best qualities of us only completely innocent.
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    Mar 08, 2013 12:54 PM GMT
    Baker-Stedham said Milo assumed his caregiving role without any prompting or special training.

    “Milo really cares for Eddie, he always licks his face, they sleep in the same room and spend all their time together,” she said. “Milo even wears bells on his collar so that Eddie can follow him around. If Eddie wanders off, Milo will go and look for him and bring him back to me.


    Taking some of the magic off this, animal behaviorists might propose that this is pack and herd behavior seen among some species. Caring for an injured or sick member of the group might benefit the entire group in a communal way, for the same reasons these species form herds in the first place.

    Mutual assistance can be a survival strategy that becomes instinctive, regardless of the condition, until the individual becomes too great a burden on the group and a detriment. And although these dogs are different breeds, dogs retain common genes, and much of their instincts & behaviors are shared.

    But even if this isn't altruistic behavior but instinctive, it nevertheless offers an example of mutual cooperation & support that humans should emulate. After all, if a dog can help another dog, how should humans treat other humans? We are social animals, too, and many of the same rules of community assistance apply, or should.
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    Mar 08, 2013 12:56 PM GMT
    too early for such cuteness.icon_lol.gif
  • mybud

    Posts: 11836

    Mar 08, 2013 2:36 PM GMT
    This is my weakness....My tough heart melts like butter.....
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    Mar 08, 2013 9:10 PM GMT
    ART_DECO saidBaker-Stedham said Milo assumed his caregiving role without any prompting or special training.

    “Milo really cares for Eddie, he always licks his face, they sleep in the same room and spend all their time together,” she said. “Milo even wears bells on his collar so that Eddie can follow him around. If Eddie wanders off, Milo will go and look for him and bring him back to me.


    Taking some of the magic off this, animal behaviorists might propose that this is pack and herd behavior seen among some species. Caring for an injured or sick member of the group might benefit the entire group in a communal way, for the same reasons these species form herds in the first place.

    Mutual assistance can be a survival strategy that becomes instinctive, regardless of the condition, until the individual becomes too great a burden on the group and a detriment. And although these dogs are different breeds, dogs retain common genes, and much of their instincts & behaviors are shared.

    But even if this isn't altruistic behavior but instinctive, it nevertheless offers an example of mutual cooperation & support that humans should emulate. After all, if a dog can help another dog, how should humans treat other humans? We are social animals, too, and many of the same rules of community assistance apply, or should.


    What do you mean by "community assistance"? I hope you mean the voluntary help given by individuals to others in need, it happens all the time in life. I'm not one who thinks the world is full of rats out to get you. There are many good people out there.
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    Mar 08, 2013 9:16 PM GMT
    awww shem, really a beautiful, touching article. Love dogs*