Breaking: Queen Elizabeth II To Make Historic Pledge Tomorrow Promoting Gay Rights and ‘Gender Equality’

  • MiamiRealJock

    Posts: 78

    Mar 10, 2013 1:58 AM GMT

    Queen Elizabeth II will make a live television broadcast tomorrow, in which the Daily Mail is reporting she will make a historic pledge promoting gay rights and ‘gender equality’ in one of the most controversial acts of her reign.

    She is expected to sign a new Commonwealth charter designed to stop discrimination against homosexual people and promote the ‘empowerment’ of women. Part of the charter, dubbed a ‘21st Century Commonwealth Magna Carta,’ will read: ‘We are implacably opposed to all forms of discrimination, whether rooted in gender, race, colour, creed, political belief or other grounds’. The Daily Mail points out that the ‘other grounds’ was intended to refer to sexuality, "but specific reference to ‘gays and lesbians’ was omitted in deference to Commonwealth countries with draconian anti-gay laws."

    (This is historic because she has never addressed these issues in 61 years)
    Read More Below:

    http://thegailygrind.com/2013/03/09/queen-elizabeth-ii-to-make-historic-pledge-tomorrow-promoting-gay-rights-and-gender-equality/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 10, 2013 2:15 AM GMT
    I think we should withhold judgment until we see what actually happens. The Daily Mail reporting this does not instill confidence.
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    Mar 10, 2013 2:35 AM GMT
    The charter HM Queen Elizabeth II, is going to sign, is not specifically for us homosexuals, as it's a charter which aims to tackle all discrimination; go for it Mother England. How sad it is that America once a leader, is now being left behind on so many levels.
  • FitAquarian

    Posts: 78

    Mar 10, 2013 2:53 AM GMT
    England has been more culturally progressive than Americans on this issue for many years now. There seemed to be this huge cultural shift in the 80's over there. America has been making strides though.
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    Mar 10, 2013 11:22 AM GMT
    Without gay people she would be missing half her staff. The speech is a welcome development, but is unlikely to change the attitude of some Commonwealth nations (particularly in Africa) toward gay people. They need to be hit where it hurts: No more development cash until they de-criminalize homosexuality.
  • FitGwynedd

    Posts: 1468

    Mar 10, 2013 12:18 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidWithout gay people she would be missing half her staff. The speech is a welcome development, but is unlikely to change the attitude of some Commonwealth nations (particularly in Africa) toward gay people. They need to be hit where it hurts: No more development cash until they de-criminalize homosexuality.


    Finally, you say something intelligent. Took you long enough.
  • FitGwynedd

    Posts: 1468

    Mar 10, 2013 12:19 PM GMT
    FitAquarian saidEngland has been more culturally progressive than Americans on this issue for many years now. There seemed to be this huge cultural shift in the 80's over there. America has been making strides though.


    Please cite how it was specifically 'England' and not Wales, Scotland, Cornwall and Northern Ireland that is culturally progressive.
  • carew28

    Posts: 661

    Mar 10, 2013 10:12 PM GMT
    Here in the U.S.A. most national progressive civil rights legislation took place in the 1960s and 1970s. Since then, most civil rights legislation has been enacted at the State level, where things happen much more slowly. Some states are very culturally progressive in the line of civil-rights, others are more backwards and slow to accept any sort of change. And some of the recent legislation has actually been anti-gay. Even some of the national legislation, such as DOMA, has actually been anti-civil-rights. There are exceptions to this though, such as the recent legislation giving gays full rights in military service (repealling "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"). Although when it was first put in place maybe 15 years ago or so, "Don't Ask,Don't Tell" was meant to be supportive of gays, repealling the old military code of conduct that made being gay a dischargeable offense.

    Just guessing, but maybe in the U.K. legislation probably comes from the top down, in other words from the national level down to the local level, so it's maybe more progressive at the current time.
  • FitAquarian

    Posts: 78

    Mar 11, 2013 10:32 PM GMT
    carew28 said Here in the U.S.A. most national progressive civil rights legislation took place in the 1960s and 1970s. Since then, most civil rights legislation has been enacted at the State level, where things happen much more slowly. Some states are very culturally progressive in the line of civil-rights, others are more backwards and slow to accept any sort of change. And some of the recent legislation has actually been anti-gay. Even some of the national legislation, such as DOMA, has actually been anti-civil-rights. There are exceptions to this though, such as the recent legislation giving gays full rights in military service (repealling "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"). Although when it was first put in place maybe 15 years ago or so, "Don't Ask,Don't Tell" was meant to be supportive of gays, repealling the old military code of conduct that made being gay a dischargeable offense.

    Just guessing, but maybe in the U.K. legislation probably comes from the top down, in other words from the national level down to the local level, so it's maybe more progressive at the current time.


    I agree that there are many parts of the U.S.A. that are culturally different. However, even though there are very liberal parts of the country, media representations of gay people have not always been complementary. As much as Hollywood supports the cause for equality, their primary interest has always been money and appealing to the majority.

    I believe that social change always precedes any meaningful legislation. There are many turning points in our recent history such as the AIDS epidemic which helped put a spotlight on us. However, this also brought on the bigots in full force who used it to declare it gods punishment. For all the good we have done, there are still many Americans who feel that coming out would hurt their career or relationship prospects.

    I really feel that in order for the culture to change, we will need a lot more straight allies to fight for our cause and for their to be more realistic and positive representations of gay people in the mainstream media. I was shocked how so many English musical artists (most of who are straight) play up to their gay fanbase when so much of that wouldn't fly over here.
  • FitAquarian

    Posts: 78

    Mar 11, 2013 10:43 PM GMT
    FitGwynedd said
    FitAquarian saidEngland has been more culturally progressive than Americans on this issue for many years now. There seemed to be this huge cultural shift in the 80's over there. America has been making strides though.


    Please cite how it was specifically 'England' and not Wales, Scotland, Cornwall and Northern Ireland that is culturally progressive.


    I've never been to other parts of the U.K. but would be interested in hearing your perspective if you care to share.