Astrobiologists Find Ancient Fossils in Fireball Fragments

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 11, 2013 2:27 PM GMT
    http://www.technologyreview.com/view/512381/astrobiologists-find-ancient-fossils-in-fireball-fragments/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 11, 2013 4:01 PM GMT
    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRo9cWhcIWB8wdvzfmGsWm
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 11, 2013 4:16 PM GMT
    StudlyScrewRite saidimages?q=tbn:ANd9GcRo9cWhcIWB8wdvzfmGsWm

    LOL!

    At this point, as good an explanation is that these fragments are from Earth itself, when an earlier cosmic impact ejected material into space, outside Earth's gravity. Millions of years later one of them crossed Earth's orbit and reentered the atmosphere. This is the same process by which alleged Martian rocks have been found on Earth.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 12, 2013 5:38 AM GMT
    Yawnz. Some people just never learn. In case you didn't know, people have been publishing papers like this for a hundred years. It's all just wishful thinking. These particular guys (who are not biologists) have done so several times. I once got sucked into being a co-author on one of them - rather embarrassing. (i.e., they used some of my data but grossly misinterpreted it.)

    Bottom line: yes, there is some carbon in carbonaceous chondrites. Not particularly surprising. Notice how it fails to make headlines... you only get to "cry wolf" so many times...
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Mar 12, 2013 5:42 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidYawnz. Some people just never learn. In case you didn't know, people have been publishing papers like this for a hundred years. It's all just wishful thinking. These particular guys (who are not biologists) have done so several times. I once got sucked into being a co-author on one of them - rather embarrassing. (i.e., they used some of my data but grossly misinterpreted it.)

    Bottom line: yes, there is some carbon in carbonaceous chondrites. Not particularly surprising. Notice how it fails to make headlines... you only get to "cry wolf" so many times...


    What?! People fake credentials and findings for fame?!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 12, 2013 5:53 AM GMT
    Oh, no, their "credentials" are sorta real, but have nothing to do with biology. Just sort of overly enthusiastic, slightly stupid fanboys. The addresses keep changing because they keep getting kicked out of their departments, when people realize how loopy they are.

    Notice how last month,, they tried claiming that the meteorite rained living algae down on the earth.

    Damn. I'm gonna have to start publishing shit in "journal of cosmology" and drive up my publication count.