Exercises suggestions after herniated disc

  • roadahead

    Posts: 3

    Mar 11, 2013 9:54 PM GMT
    Hi all,
    I need some suggestions on what routines I should do (avoid) after I have herniated disc (still recovering, it's been a month and half). Thanks.
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    Mar 12, 2013 1:05 AM GMT
    roadahead saidHi all,
    I need some suggestions on what routines I should do (avoid) after I have herniated disc (still recovering, it's been a month and half). Thanks.

    If you're willing to provide more details on your condition (i.e. level of disc herniation, absence/presence of neural symptoms, previous physical activity history, etc.), we might all be able to provide you with some answers in turn. icon_wink.gif
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    Mar 12, 2013 1:34 AM GMT
    Front and side planks, no-weight squats, hamstring stretches, and an inversion table.

    <-- herniated L4 & 5 three years ago, almost needed surgery, and now participates in adrenaline sports.
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    Mar 12, 2013 1:50 AM GMT
    Unless your disk problem is real intense (note what the poster's above wrote), a lot of times ice and rest can be the best thing to get it calmed down. Next, do see a DOCTOR of Physical Therapy...not chiropractor. The D.Pt. understands body mechanics, and, can work with (even using manipulation if need me) to CORRECT the issue(s) that have caused your problem.

    If you don't own a foam roll, you should. I constantly tweak my back up, and the foam roll, and ice, can be my best friends.

    Stretching can be important, but, most important you need to fix whatever you did to mess your up, and any imbalances. Most times, these things will fix themselves if you avoid the chiropractor and work on rehab.

    I know that it might silly, but, if something causes your back to flair...well...don't do that. Pain can be your guide better than most folks here.

    Getting, and staying, strong, and flexible, will keep it from happening again, but, D. Pt. can see if you have any imbalances that are causing the issue, or making it worse.
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    Mar 12, 2013 1:52 AM GMT
    chuckystud saidUnless your disk problem is real intense (note what the poster's above wrote), a lot of times ice and rest can be the best thing to get it calmed down. Next, do see a DOCTOR of Physical Therapy...not chiropractor. ...
    I saw a DPT. He referred me to a neurologist. He had me get an MRI. Then he told me there's nothing he can do, and referred me to a chiropractor.
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    Mar 12, 2013 1:54 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    chuckystud saidUnless your disk problem is real intense (note what the poster's above wrote), a lot of times ice and rest can be the best thing to get it calmed down. Next, do see a DOCTOR of Physical Therapy...not chiropractor. ...
    I saw a DPT. He referred me to a neurologist. He had me get an MRI. Then he told me there's nothing he can do, and referred me to a chiropractor.


    Get yourself some gels pacs...freeze 'em, and see if it'll calm down. If you want to manipulate it, it's better having someone who has the knowledge of a P.T. vs a chiro.
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    Mar 12, 2013 1:57 AM GMT
    chuckystud said
    paulflexes said
    chuckystud saidUnless your disk problem is real intense (note what the poster's above wrote), a lot of times ice and rest can be the best thing to get it calmed down. Next, do see a DOCTOR of Physical Therapy...not chiropractor. ...
    I saw a DPT. He referred me to a neurologist. He had me get an MRI. Then he told me there's nothing he can do, and referred me to a chiropractor.


    Get yourself some gels pacs...freeze 'em, and see if it'll calm down. If you want to manipulate it, it's better having someone who has the knowledge of a P.T. vs a chiro.
    Fortunately, my chiro is also a practicing P.T. and specializes in sports medicine.
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    Mar 12, 2013 2:14 AM GMT
    DC versus DPT?

    I guess every case is different. My injuries haven't recurred with any greater or lesser regularity using either, but I've recovered much faster from every slipped disc, spasm and ligament tear with my chiropractor, who's an active release therapy (A.R.T.) specialist, than my physical therapist. Though he's also an NPC master's champion who was flown to England to work on Dorian Yates during the Olympia so perhaps he's exceptional.
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    Mar 12, 2013 2:22 AM GMT
    eagermuscle saidDC versus DPT?

    I guess every case is different. My injuries haven't recurred with any greater or lesser regularity using either, but I've recovered much faster from every slipped disc, spasm and ligament tear with my chiropractor, who's an active release therapy (A.R.T.) specialist, than my physical therapist. Though he's also an NPC master's champion who was flown to England to work on Dorian Yates during the Olympia so perhaps he's exceptional.
    My injuries haven't recurred...period.

    I blame it on the inversion table, since it keeps my spine decompressed. After all, disk compression is the most common cause of herniation. icon_wink.gif

    Oh, and I fall down...A LOT! Just comes with the territory of mountain biking.
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    Mar 12, 2013 2:24 AM GMT
    I blew out a disc when I was 34 and was unable to exercise for 6 months, other than going to PT. Since then, by regular exercise and proper form, it's been under good control. I'd recommend becoming religious about stretch exercises as part of your daily routine. For me, I had to avoid all heavy lifting, especially leg stuff for those 6 months, then, returned slowly to my routine. Good luck.
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    Mar 12, 2013 2:31 AM GMT
    Paul, aside from one recent freak injury when I torqued the wrong way while bending to pick up something off the floor, my injuries, reaggravated and otherwise, happen when I have to do things like swing a pick digging ditches in solid coral rock to appease my 80 year old father, run through an airport through no fault of my own, or fall down the stairs. I don't blame my chiropractor or physical therapist for my own bad judgment. Maybe you're even more active, but your lack of recurrences could largely be due to your own physical makeup and the type and extent of your initial injury, not the relative skill of your medical team. (I also use an inversion table, nightly.) Everybody's different.
  • roadahead

    Posts: 3

    Mar 12, 2013 8:47 PM GMT
    I am not feeling pain in general but after walking for more than 15 minutes I feel sore and the next day some pain. The orthopedic doc recommended having epidural injection. I just need ways to strengthen it so I can get back to normal routines like just doing simple shopping.